Noodle Weekly Round-Up: Online Courses

Not only are online courses being offered to enrolled students, but now top schools like Harvard, Stanford and MIT offer MOOCs that are open to everyone. We've found some of the best articles highlighting trends and exciting news in the world of online learning.

Skepticism toward online courses is totally understandable. After all, most of us have grown up thinking that learning takes place inside a classroom, with a teacher who can engage with us face to face. But just as technology has evolved and changed the way we all communicate on a day-to-day basis, so has education technology. Not only are online coursesnow being offered to enrolled students all over the country, but now top schools like Harvard, Stanford and MITare offering MOOCs (aka Massive Open Online Courses) that are open to anyone interested in expanding their learning.

So for this week's round up, we've found some of the best articles highlighting trends and exciting news in the world of online learning:

Though online courses were just for school? Think again. According toThe Wall Street Journal, big companies like AT&T and Google are now helping to fund MOOCs to help students develop important skills that can help them advance in the job market.

Some online courses charge a fee, but others are totally free! Check out Business Insider's list of 15 Free Online Courses That Are Actually Worth Your Time. From introductory classes onstatistics and microeconomics to learning how to build a start up, these classes will help you expand your mind, free of charge!

If you're a fan of_The Walking Dead_, then you're in luck! Wired reports that AMC is joining forces with educational tech company Instructure, and the University of California, Irvine to create a free MOOC called "Society, Science, Survival: Lessons from AMCs The Walking Dead." This class will usethe seires as a basis to, "explore principles of science, physics, math, and health sciences."

So why would a teacher be interested in teaching an online course?Good question. Inside Higher Ed breaks down some of the key benefits for why a teacher should consider teaching a course online.

MOOCs aren't just gaining popularity in the U.S.The New York Times reports that many European universities are now taking part in the trend, and offering online courses to their students. The article explains that these foreign universities are turning to online courses as a way to save on teaching costs and expand their student audience.

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