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University of Maryland-University College

"University of Maryland-University College serves adult, part-time students at classroom sites throughout Maryland, the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area, and at hundreds of locations overseas. In fact, students can "attend class" from anywhere on the planet that can be connected electronically, so "the sun never sets on the University of Maryland."

23
Selectivity
78
Outcomes
77
Environment
Master's University, Open Admissions, Focus on Undergraduate Arts and Science, Focus on Undergraduate Professions

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University of Maryland-University College's Full Profile

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Overview

Overview

Noodle Says

"University of Maryland-University College serves adult, part-time students at classroom sites throughout Maryland, the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area, and at hundreds of locations overseas. In fact, students can "attend class" from anywhere on the planet that can be connected electronically, so "the sun never sets on the University of Maryland."

People are saying

University of Maryland-University College says

Founded in 1947, UMUC is one of 11 accredited, degree-granting institutions in the University System of Maryland (USM). Offering a broad range of cutting-edge classes, UMUC has earned a global reputation for excellence as a comprehensive virtual university and for focusing on the unique educational and professional development needs of adult students. Headquartered in Adelphi, Maryland, UMUC has classroom locations in the Washington, D.C., metropolitan area, Europe and Asia, and provides award-winning online classes to students worldwide. A UMUC education offers many advantages not found at other institutions. Offering maximum convenience, flexibility, and a wide array of course selections, it's no wonder UMUC is the educational choice for adult students worldwide.

A Wide Selection of Academic Programs: As a globally-focused university serving more than 90,000 students worldwide, UMUC offers an unparalleled breadth of programs, each tailored to meet the needs of the marketplace. Whatever your field of interest, you're sure to find the program that will equip you with the knowledge and skills to advance your career.

Convenience: Choose to enroll in an online program and you can attend class when and where you want, without interrupting your job or personal life. No hassles with commuting or crowded classrooms. Simply log in to your online classroom to start learning.

Flexibility: Prefer a classroom experience? Many of UMUC's courses are also taught in convenient locations throughout Maryland and the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area. Some course offerings even have a hybrid format, which allow students to alternate between online and on-site class meetings.

State-of-the-Art Education: UMUC's programs are designed to provide you with in-demand skills and expertise. The curriculum is continually updated to reflect the latest information, concepts, and practices in a variety of fields. So you'll be armed with the education and skills you need to advance.

Experienced Instructors: UMUC courses are taught by experienced professionals. Aside from impressive academic and professional credentials, many UMUC faculty members hold high-level positions within the fields they teach. Their first-hand knowledge and experience can be immediately applied to your career success.

Financial Options: An array of financial programs are available, including grants, loans, and scholarships. UMUC's highly trained and helpful financial aid specialists can help you find the option that's right for you.

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Student Life

Student Life

People are saying

Student Body

Total Undergraduates 26,740
Gender 51% Male / 49% Female
Enrollment Breakdown 23% Full Time / 77% Part Time
Geography 56% In State / 44% Out of State / 1% International
Socio-Economic Diversity 60% of students received Pell Grants, which are provided by the U.S. government to students from middle and lower income families. It gives you an idea of a school’s socio-economic diversity.
Ethnic Diversity
Percentage
White 41%
Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander 0%
Multi-racial 3%
International 1%
Hispanic/Latino 9%
Ethnicity Unknown 11%
Black or African American 30%
Asian 4%
American Indian or Alaska Native 1%

Student Services

  • Academic Support Services: tutoring writing center
  • Computer Services: computer center, libraries wireless network available
  • Counseling Services: career counseling adult (re-entering) student services/programs veteran's counselor financial aid counseling
  • Facilities
  • Special Needs Services: services and/or facilities for hearing impaired partial services for students with learning disabilities services and/or facilities for visually impaired wheelchair accessibility services and/or facilities for speech or communications disorders
  • Specialty Programs (ROTC, Accelerated Programs, Professional Development, etc.): accelerated program cooperative education cross-registration dual enrollment of high school students external degree program double major teacher certification independent study internships
  • Transfer In Services
  • Transfer Out Services

Academics

Academics

Popular Majors

Business Administration and Management (22%), Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, Other (10%), Information Science/Studies (9%), Psychology (7%), Accounting (6%), Computer and Information Sciences (6%)

Majors Offered

Bachelor's

A program that focuses on the history, society, politics, culture, and economics of one or more of the peoples of the Asian Continent, including the study of the Asian diasporas overseas.

Job Opportunities:

Area, Ethnic, and Cultural Studies Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses pertaining to the culture and development of an area, an ethnic group, or any other group, such as Latin American studies, women's studies, or urban affairs. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.

A general program that focuses on the English language, including its history, structure and related communications skills; and the literature and culture of English-speaking peoples.

Job Opportunities:

English Language and Literature Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in English language and literature, including linguistics and comparative literature. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.
Secondary School Teachers, Except Special and Career/Technical Education
Teach students in one or more subjects, such as English, mathematics, or social studies at the secondary level in public or private schools. May be designated according to subject matter specialty.

A program that focuses on the general study and interpretation of the past, including the gathering, recording, synthesizing and criticizing of evidence and theories about past events. Includes instruction in historiography; historical research methods; studies of specific periods, issues and cultures; and applications to areas such as historic preservation, public policy, and records administration.

Job Opportunities:

Managers, All Other
All managers not listed separately.
Historians
Research, analyze, record, and interpret the past as recorded in sources, such as government and institutional records, newspapers and other periodicals, photographs, interviews, films, electronic media, and unpublished manuscripts, such as personal diaries and letters.
History Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in human history and historiography. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.
Secondary School Teachers, Except Special and Career/Technical Education
Teach students in one or more subjects, such as English, mathematics, or social studies at the secondary level in public or private schools. May be designated according to subject matter specialty.

Any single instructional program in liberal arts and sciences, general studies and humanities not listed above.

Associates

Any single instructional program in liberal arts and sciences, general studies and humanities not listed above.

Bachelor's

A program that prepares individuals to practice the profession of accounting and to perform related business functions. Includes instruction in accounting principles and theory, financial accounting, managerial accounting, cost accounting, budget control, tax accounting, legal aspects of accounting, auditing, reporting procedures, statement analysis, planning and consulting, business information systems, accounting research methods, professional standards and ethics, and applications to specific for-profit, public, and non-profit organizations.

Job Opportunities:

Accountants and Auditors
Examine, analyze, and interpret accounting records to prepare financial statements, give advice, or audit and evaluate statements prepared by others. Install or advise on systems of recording costs or other financial and budgetary data.
Budget Analysts
Examine budget estimates for completeness, accuracy, and conformance with procedures and regulations. Analyze budgeting and accounting reports.
Credit Analysts
Analyze credit data and financial statements of individuals or firms to determine the degree of risk involved in extending credit or lending money. Prepare reports with credit information for use in decision making.
Financial Examiners
Enforce or ensure compliance with laws and regulations governing financial and securities institutions and financial and real estate transactions. May examine, verify, or authenticate records.
Tax Examiners and Collectors, and Revenue Agents
Determine tax liability or collect taxes from individuals or business firms according to prescribed laws and regulations.
Business Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in business administration and management, such as accounting, finance, human resources, labor and industrial relations, marketing, and operations research. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.

A program that generally prepares individuals to plan, organize, direct, and control the functions and processes of a firm or organization. Includes instruction in management theory, human resources management and behavior, accounting and other quantitative methods, purchasing and logistics, organization and production, marketing, and business decision-making.

Job Opportunities:

Chief Executives
Determine and formulate policies and provide overall direction of companies or private and public sector organizations within guidelines set up by a board of directors or similar governing body. Plan, direct, or coordinate operational activities at the highest level of management with the help of subordinate executives and staff managers.
General and Operations Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate the operations of public or private sector organizations. Duties and responsibilities include formulating policies, managing daily operations, and planning the use of materials and human resources, but are too diverse and general in nature to be classified in any one functional area of management or administration, such as personnel, purchasing, or administrative services.
Sales Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate the actual distribution or movement of a product or service to the customer. Coordinate sales distribution by establishing sales territories, quotas, and goals and establish training programs for sales representatives. Analyze sales statistics gathered by staff to determine sales potential and inventory requirements and monitor the preferences of customers.
Administrative Services Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate one or more administrative services of an organization, such as records and information management, mail distribution, facilities planning and maintenance, custodial operations, and other office support services.
Industrial Production Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate the work activities and resources necessary for manufacturing products in accordance with cost, quality, and quantity specifications.
Transportation, Storage, and Distribution Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate transportation, storage, or distribution activities in accordance with organizational policies and applicable government laws or regulations. Includes logistics managers.
Construction Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate, usually through subordinate supervisory personnel, activities concerned with the construction and maintenance of structures, facilities, and systems. Participate in the conceptual development of a construction project and oversee its organization, scheduling, budgeting, and implementation. Includes managers in specialized construction fields, such as carpentry or plumbing.
Social and Community Service Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate the activities of a social service program or community outreach organization. Oversee the program or organization's budget and policies regarding participant involvement, program requirements, and benefits. Work may involve directing social workers, counselors, or probation officers.
Managers, All Other
All managers not listed separately.
Cost Estimators
Prepare cost estimates for product manufacturing, construction projects, or services to aid management in bidding on or determining price of product or service. May specialize according to particular service performed or type of product manufactured.
Management Analysts
Conduct organizational studies and evaluations, design systems and procedures, conduct work simplification and measurement studies, and prepare operations and procedures manuals to assist management in operating more efficiently and effectively. Includes program analysts and management consultants.
Business Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in business administration and management, such as accounting, finance, human resources, labor and industrial relations, marketing, and operations research. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.

Any instructional program in business and administration not listed above.

A program that generally prepares individuals to plan, manage, and analyze the financial and monetary aspects and performance of business enterprises, banking institutions, or other organizations. Includes instruction in principles of accounting, financial instruments, capital planning, funds acquisition, asset and debt management, budgeting, financial analysis, and investments and portfolio management.

Job Opportunities:

Chief Executives
Determine and formulate policies and provide overall direction of companies or private and public sector organizations within guidelines set up by a board of directors or similar governing body. Plan, direct, or coordinate operational activities at the highest level of management with the help of subordinate executives and staff managers.
General and Operations Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate the operations of public or private sector organizations. Duties and responsibilities include formulating policies, managing daily operations, and planning the use of materials and human resources, but are too diverse and general in nature to be classified in any one functional area of management or administration, such as personnel, purchasing, or administrative services.
Financial Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate accounting, investing, banking, insurance, securities, and other financial activities of a branch, office, or department of an establishment.
Budget Analysts
Examine budget estimates for completeness, accuracy, and conformance with procedures and regulations. Analyze budgeting and accounting reports.
Credit Analysts
Analyze credit data and financial statements of individuals or firms to determine the degree of risk involved in extending credit or lending money. Prepare reports with credit information for use in decision making.
Financial Analysts
Conduct quantitative analyses of information affecting investment programs of public or private institutions.
Personal Financial Advisors
Advise clients on financial plans using knowledge of tax and investment strategies, securities, insurance, pension plans, and real estate. Duties include assessing clients' assets, liabilities, cash flow, insurance coverage, tax status, and financial objectives.
Loan Officers
Evaluate, authorize, or recommend approval of commercial, real estate, or credit loans. Advise borrowers on financial status and payment methods. Includes mortgage loan officers and agents, collection analysts, loan servicing officers, and loan underwriters.
Financial Specialists, All Other
All financial specialists not listed separately.
Business Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in business administration and management, such as accounting, finance, human resources, labor and industrial relations, marketing, and operations research. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.

A program that generally prepares individuals to manage the development of human capital in organizations, and to provide related services to individuals and groups. Includes instruction in personnel and organization policy, human resource dynamics and flows, labor relations, sex roles, civil rights, human resources law and regulations, motivation and compensation systems, work systems, career management, employee testing and assessment, recruitment and selection, managing employee and job training programs, and the management of human resources programs and operations.

Job Opportunities:

Compensation and Benefits Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate compensation and benefits activities of an organization.
Human Resources Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate human resources activities and staff of an organization.
Training and Development Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate the training and development activities and staff of an organization.
Human Resources Specialists
Perform activities in the human resource area. Includes employment specialists who screen, recruit, interview, and place workers.
Labor Relations Specialists
Resolve disputes between workers and managers, negotiate collective bargaining agreements, or coordinate grievance procedures to handle employee complaints.
Compensation, Benefits, and Job Analysis Specialists
Conduct programs of compensation and benefits and job analysis for employer. May specialize in specific areas, such as position classification and pension programs.
Training and Development Specialists
Design and conduct training and development programs to improve individual and organizational performance. May analyze training needs.
Business Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in business administration and management, such as accounting, finance, human resources, labor and industrial relations, marketing, and operations research. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.

A program that prepares individuals to manage international businesses and/or business operations. Includes instruction in the principles and processes of export sales, trade controls, foreign operations and related problems, monetary issues, international business policy, and applications to doing business in specific countries and markets.

Job Opportunities:

Chief Executives
Determine and formulate policies and provide overall direction of companies or private and public sector organizations within guidelines set up by a board of directors or similar governing body. Plan, direct, or coordinate operational activities at the highest level of management with the help of subordinate executives and staff managers.
General and Operations Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate the operations of public or private sector organizations. Duties and responsibilities include formulating policies, managing daily operations, and planning the use of materials and human resources, but are too diverse and general in nature to be classified in any one functional area of management or administration, such as personnel, purchasing, or administrative services.
Business Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in business administration and management, such as accounting, finance, human resources, labor and industrial relations, marketing, and operations research. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.

A program that generally prepares individuals to undertake and manage the process of developing consumer audiences and moving products from producers to consumers. Includes instruction in buyer behavior and dynamics, principle of marketing research, demand analysis, cost-volume and profit relationships, pricing theory, marketing campaign and strategic planning, market segments, advertising methods, sales operations and management, consumer relations, retailing, and applications to specific products and markets.

Job Opportunities:

Advertising and Promotions Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate advertising policies and programs or produce collateral materials, such as posters, contests, coupons, or give-aways, to create extra interest in the purchase of a product or service for a department, an entire organization, or on an account basis.
Marketing Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate marketing policies and programs, such as determining the demand for products and services offered by a firm and its competitors, and identify potential customers. Develop pricing strategies with the goal of maximizing the firm's profits or share of the market while ensuring the firm's customers are satisfied. Oversee product development or monitor trends that indicate the need for new products and services.
Sales Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate the actual distribution or movement of a product or service to the customer. Coordinate sales distribution by establishing sales territories, quotas, and goals and establish training programs for sales representatives. Analyze sales statistics gathered by staff to determine sales potential and inventory requirements and monitor the preferences of customers.
Market Research Analysts and Marketing Specialists
Research market conditions in local, regional, or national areas, or gather information to determine potential sales of a product or service, or create a marketing campaign. May gather information on competitors, prices, sales, and methods of marketing and distribution.
Business Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in business administration and management, such as accounting, finance, human resources, labor and industrial relations, marketing, and operations research. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.

Bachelor's

A program that focuses on the human aging process and aged human populations, using the knowledge and methodologies of the social sciences, psychology and the biological and health sciences.

Job Opportunities:

Medical Scientists, Except Epidemiologists
Conduct research dealing with the understanding of human diseases and the improvement of human health. Engage in clinical investigation, research and development, or other related activities. Includes physicians, dentists, public health specialists, pharmacologists, and medical pathologists who primarily conduct research.
Social Scientists and Related Workers, All Other
All social scientists and related workers not listed separately.

Any instructional program in multi/interdisciplinary studies not listed above.

Bachelor's

A program that focuses on the criminal justice system, its organizational components and processes, and its legal and public policy contexts. Includes instruction in criminal law and policy, police and correctional systems organization, the administration of justice and the judiciary, and public attitudes regarding criminal justice issues.

Job Opportunities:

Criminal Justice and Law Enforcement Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in criminal justice, corrections, and law enforcement administration. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.
First-Line Supervisors of Correctional Officers
Directly supervise and coordinate activities of correctional officers and jailers.
First-Line Supervisors of Police and Detectives
Directly supervise and coordinate activities of members of police force.

A program focusing on the principles, theory, and practices associated with the management of fire operations, firefighting services, and community fire issues. Includes instruction in fire protection history and theory, incident command leadership, administration of public fire organizations, labor relations, emergency medical services management, fire emergency response strategies and mitigation, legal and regulatory responsibilities, budgeting, public relations, and organizational leadership.

Job Opportunities:

Managers, All Other
All managers not listed separately.
First-Line Supervisors of Fire Fighting and Prevention Workers
Directly supervise and coordinate activities of workers engaged in fire fighting and fire prevention and control.

A program that focuses on the application of the physical, biomedical, and social sciences to the analysis and evaluation of physical evidence, human testimony and criminal suspects. Includes instruction in forensic medicine, forensic dentistry, anthropology, psychology, entomology, pathology, forensic laboratory technology and autopsy procedures, DNA and blood pattern analysis, crime scene analysis, crime scene photography, fingerprint technology, document analysis, witness and suspect examination procedures, applicable law and regulations, and professional standards and ethics.

Job Opportunities:

Forensic Science Technicians
Collect, identify, classify, and analyze physical evidence related to criminal investigations. Perform tests on weapons or substances, such as fiber, hair, and tissue to determine significance to investigation. May testify as expert witnesses on evidence or crime laboratory techniques. May serve as specialists in area of expertise, such as ballistics, fingerprinting, handwriting, or biochemistry.
Criminal Justice and Law Enforcement Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in criminal justice, corrections, and law enforcement administration. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.

Any instructional program in public administration and services not listed above.

Bachelor's

Any instructional program in the biological and biomedical sciences not listed above.

Job Opportunities:

Natural Sciences Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate activities in such fields as life sciences, physical sciences, mathematics, statistics, and research and development in these fields.
Biological Scientists, All Other
All biological scientists not listed separately.
Life Scientists, All Other
All life scientists not listed separately.
Biological Science Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in biological sciences. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.

A general program that focuses on computing, computer science, and information science and systems. Such programs are undifferentiated as to title and content and are not to be confused with specific programs in computer science, information science, or related support services.

Job Opportunities:

Computer and Information Systems Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate activities in such fields as electronic data processing, information systems, systems analysis, and computer programming.
Computer and Information Research Scientists
Conduct research into fundamental computer and information science as theorists, designers, or inventors. Develop solutions to problems in the field of computer hardware and software.
Computer Systems Analysts
Analyze science, engineering, business, and other data processing problems to implement and improve computer systems. Analyze user requirements, procedures, and problems to automate or improve existing systems and review computer system capabilities, workflow, and scheduling limitations. May analyze or recommend commercially available software.
Database Administrators
Administer, test, and implement computer databases, applying knowledge of database management systems. Coordinate changes to computer databases. May plan, coordinate, and implement security measures to safeguard computer databases.
Network and Computer Systems Administrators
Install, configure, and support an organization's local area network (LAN), wide area network (WAN), and Internet systems or a segment of a network system. Monitor network to ensure network availability to all system users and may perform necessary maintenance to support network availability. May monitor and test Web site performance to ensure Web sites operate correctly and without interruption. May assist in network modeling, analysis, planning, and coordination between network and data communications hardware and software. May supervise computer user support specialists and computer network support specialists. May administer network security measures.
Computer Network Architects
Design and implement computer and information networks, such as local area networks (LAN), wide area networks (WAN), intranets, extranets, and other data communications networks. Perform network modeling, analysis, and planning. May also design network and computer security measures. May research and recommend network and data communications hardware and software.
Computer Occupations, All Other
All computer occupations not listed separately.
Computer Science Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in computer science. May specialize in a field of computer science, such as the design and function of computers or operations and research analysis. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.

A program that prepares individuals to assess the security needs of computer and network systems, recommend safeguard solutions, and manage the implementation and maintenance of security devices, systems, and procedures. Includes instruction in computer architecture, programming, and systems analysis; networking; telecommunications; cryptography; security system design; applicable law and regulations; risk assessment and policy analysis; contingency planning; user access issues; investigation techniques; and troubleshooting.

Job Opportunities:

Computer and Information Systems Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate activities in such fields as electronic data processing, information systems, systems analysis, and computer programming.
Information Security Analysts
Plan, implement, upgrade, or monitor security measures for the protection of computer networks and information. May ensure appropriate security controls are in place that will safeguard digital files and vital electronic infrastructure. May respond to computer security breaches and viruses.
Database Administrators
Administer, test, and implement computer databases, applying knowledge of database management systems. Coordinate changes to computer databases. May plan, coordinate, and implement security measures to safeguard computer databases.
Network and Computer Systems Administrators
Install, configure, and support an organization's local area network (LAN), wide area network (WAN), and Internet systems or a segment of a network system. Monitor network to ensure network availability to all system users and may perform necessary maintenance to support network availability. May monitor and test Web site performance to ensure Web sites operate correctly and without interruption. May assist in network modeling, analysis, planning, and coordination between network and data communications hardware and software. May supervise computer user support specialists and computer network support specialists. May administer network security measures.
Computer Network Architects
Design and implement computer and information networks, such as local area networks (LAN), wide area networks (WAN), intranets, extranets, and other data communications networks. Perform network modeling, analysis, and planning. May also design network and computer security measures. May research and recommend network and data communications hardware and software.
Computer Network Support Specialists
Analyze, test, troubleshoot, and evaluate existing network systems, such as local area network (LAN), wide area network (WAN), and Internet systems or a segment of a network system. Perform network maintenance to ensure networks operate correctly with minimal interruption.

A program that focuses on the theory, organization, and process of information collection, transmission, and utilization in traditional and electronic forms. Includes instruction in information classification and organization; information storage and processing; transmission, transfer, and signaling; communications and networking; systems planning and design; human interfacing and use analysis; database development; information policy analysis; and related aspects of hardware, software, economics, social factors, and capacity.

Job Opportunities:

Computer and Information Systems Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate activities in such fields as electronic data processing, information systems, systems analysis, and computer programming.
Computer and Information Research Scientists
Conduct research into fundamental computer and information science as theorists, designers, or inventors. Develop solutions to problems in the field of computer hardware and software.
Software Developers, Systems Software
Research, design, develop, and test operating systems-level software, compilers, and network distribution software for medical, industrial, military, communications, aerospace, business, scientific, and general computing applications. Set operational specifications and formulate and analyze software requirements. May design embedded systems software. Apply principles and techniques of computer science, engineering, and mathematical analysis.
Computer Occupations, All Other
All computer occupations not listed separately.
Computer Science Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in computer science. May specialize in a field of computer science, such as the design and function of computers or operations and research analysis. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.

A general program that focuses on the studies and activities relating to the natural environment and its conservation, use, and improvement. Includes instruction in subjects such as climate, air, soil, water, land, fish and wildlife, and plant resources; in the basic principles of environmental science and natural resources management; and the recreational and economic uses of renewable and nonrenewable natural resources.

Job Opportunities:

Conservation Scientists
Manage, improve, and protect natural resources to maximize their use without damaging the environment. May conduct soil surveys and develop plans to eliminate soil erosion or to protect rangelands. May instruct farmers, agricultural production managers, or ranchers in best ways to use crop rotation, contour plowing, or terracing to conserve soil and water; in the number and kind of livestock and forage plants best suited to particular ranges; and in range and farm improvements, such as fencing and reservoirs for stock watering.
Foresters
Manage public and private forested lands for economic, recreational, and conservation purposes. May inventory the type, amount, and location of standing timber, appraise the timber's worth, negotiate the purchase, and draw up contracts for procurement. May determine how to conserve wildlife habitats, creek beds, water quality, and soil stability, and how best to comply with environmental regulations. May devise plans for planting and growing new trees, monitor trees for healthy growth, and determine optimal harvesting schedules.
Forestry and Conservation Science Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in forestry and conservation science. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.

Bachelor's

A program that generally prepares individuals to apply technical knowledge and skills in the manufacture and distribution or transmission of graphic communications products. Includes instruction in the prepress, press, and postpress phases of production operations and processes such as offset lithography, flexography, gravure, letterpress, screen printing, foil stamping, digital imaging, and other reproduction methods.

Job Opportunities:

Prepress Technicians and Workers
Format and proof text and images submitted by designers and clients into finished pages that can be printed. Includes digital and photo typesetting. May produce printing plates.

Bachelor's

A general program that focuses on the systematic study of political institutions and behavior. Includes instruction in political philosophy, political theory, comparative government and politics, political parties and interest groups, public opinion, political research methods, studies of the government and politics of specific countries, and studies of specific political institutions and processes.

Job Opportunities:

Managers, All Other
All managers not listed separately.
Political Scientists
Study the origin, development, and operation of political systems. May study topics, such as public opinion, political decision-making, and ideology. May analyze the structure and operation of governments, as well as various political entities. May conduct public opinion surveys, analyze election results, or analyze public documents.
Political Science Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in political science, international affairs, and international relations. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.

A general program that focuses on the scientific study of individual and collective behavior, the physical and environmental bases of behavior, and the analysis and treatment of behavior problems and disorders. Includes instruction in the principles of the various subfields of psychology, research methods, and psychological assessment and testing methods.

Job Opportunities:

Managers, All Other
All managers not listed separately.
Clinical, Counseling, and School Psychologists
Diagnose and treat mental disorders; learning disabilities; and cognitive, behavioral, and emotional problems, using individual, child, family, and group therapies. May design and implement behavior modification programs.
Industrial-Organizational Psychologists
Apply principles of psychology to human resources, administration, management, sales, and marketing problems. Activities may include policy planning; employee testing and selection, training and development; and organizational development and analysis. May work with management to organize the work setting to improve worker productivity.
Psychologists, All Other
All psychologists not listed separately.
Psychology Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in psychology, such as child, clinical, and developmental psychology, and psychological counseling. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.

A program that focuses on the general study of human social behavior and social institutions using any of the methodologies common to the social sciences and/or history, or an undifferentiated program of study in the social sciences.

Job Opportunities:

Managers, All Other
All managers not listed separately.
Social Scientists and Related Workers, All Other
All social scientists and related workers not listed separately.
Social Science Research Assistants
Assist social scientists in laboratory, survey, and other social science research. May help prepare findings for publication and assist in laboratory analysis, quality control, or data management.
Social Sciences Teachers, Postsecondary, All Other
All postsecondary social sciences teachers not listed separately.
Secondary School Teachers, Except Special and Career/Technical Education
Teach students in one or more subjects, such as English, mathematics, or social studies at the secondary level in public or private schools. May be designated according to subject matter specialty.

A program that focuses on the scientific, humanistic, and critical study of human communication in a variety of formats, media, and contexts. Includes instruction in the theory and practice of interpersonal, group, organizational, professional, and intercultural communication; speaking and listening; verbal and nonverbal interaction; rhetorical theory and criticism; performance studies; argumentation and persuasion; technologically mediated communication; popular culture; and various contextual applications.

Job Opportunities:

Communications Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in communications, such as organizational communications, public relations, radio/television broadcasting, and journalism. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.
Radio and Television Announcers
Speak or read from scripted materials, such as news reports or commercial messages, on radio or television. May announce artist or title of performance, identify station, or interview guests.
Public Address System and Other Announcers
Make announcements over public address system at sporting or other public events. May act as master of ceremonies or disc jockey at weddings, parties, clubs, or other gathering places.
Public Relations Specialists
Engage in promoting or creating an intended public image for individuals, groups, or organizations. May write or select material for release to various communications media.
Writers and Authors
Originate and prepare written material, such as scripts, stories, advertisements, and other material.

Administration & Faculty

President Javier Miyares
Accredited by Middle States Commission on Higher Education
Full-time Faculty 214
Student : Faculty Ratio 17 : 1
Faculty Gender (% Male : Female) 53 : 46
Percentage of Faculty Members
Non-Tenure Track Faculty 100
International Faculty 2

AP Test Credit Information

Test Name Minimum Score Equivalent Course (s) Credits
AP Art History 3.0 ARTH 100 3.0
AP Biology 4.0 BSCI 105 + LL Elective 8.0
AP Biology 5.0 BSCI 105 and 106 8.0
AP Calculus AB 4.0 MATH 140 4.0
AP Calculus BC 4.0 MATH 140 and 141 8.0
AP Chemistry 4.0 CHEM 131/132 4.0
AP Chemistry 5.0 CHEM 131/132 and 271 6.0
AP Comparative Government and Politics 3.0 GVPT 170 3.0
AP Computer Science A 3.0 N/A 4.0
AP English Language and Composition 3.0 LL Elective 3.0
AP English Language and Composition 4.0 ENGL 101 3.0
AP English Literature and Composition 3.0 LL Elective 3.0
AP English Literature and Composition 4.0 LL Elective and ENGL 240 6.0
AP Environmental Science 4.0 LL Elective 3.0
AP European History 4.0 HIST 112 or 113 3.0
AP European History 5.0 HIST 112 and 113 6.0
AP French Language and Culture 4.0 FREN 203 4.0
AP French Language and Culture 5.0 FREN 204 and 211 6.0
AP German Language and Culture 4.0 GERM 203 4.0
AP German Language and Culture 5.0 GERM 203 and 204 7.0
AP Human Geography 4.0 GEOG 202 3.0
AP Latin 4.0 LATN 201 4.0
AP Macroeconomics 4.0 ECON 201 3.0
AP Microeconomics 3.0 ECON 105 3.0
AP Microeconomics 4.0 ECON 200 3.0
AP Music Theory 4.0 MUSC 150 3.0
AP Physics B 4.0 PHYS 121 and 122 8.0
AP Psychology 4.0 PSYC 100 3.0
AP Spanish Language and Culture 4.0 SPAN 203 4.0
AP Spanish Language and Culture 5.0 SPAN 204 and 207 6.0
AP Statistics 4.0 STAT 200 3.0
AP United States Government and Politics 3.0 GVPT 280 3.0
AP United States History 4.0 HIST 156 or 157 3.0
AP United States History 5.0 IST 156 and 157 6.0
AP World History 4.0 HIST 219 3.0

Admissions

Admissions

Selectivity

Selectivity Score: 22/100
22
Selectivity

Admissions Websites

Finance

Finance

Average Net Tuition

The average student pays $9,489 for tuition, fees, and other expenses, after grants and scholarships.

Household Income Real Cost
$0-$30K $9,358

Sticker Price

Total stated tuition is $6,192, in-state and on-campus, before financial aid.

In-State

On-Campus Off-Campus
Stated Tuition $6,192 Same as On-Campus
Fees $360 Same as On-Campus
Housing N/A $17,820
Books $1,000 $1,000
Total (before financial aid) $7,552 $25,372

Out-of-State

On-Campus Off-Campus
Stated Tuition $11,976 Same as On-Campus
Fees $360 Same as On-Campus
Housing N/A $17,820
Books $1,000 $1,000
Total (before financial aid) $13,336 $31,156

Students Receiving Aid

67% of students receive some form of financial aid.

Undergrads Receiving Aid Average Aid Amount
Federal Loans 62% $7,155
Federal Scholarships/Grants 61% $3,197
Institutional Grants 11% $1,049
Other Federal Grants 4% $714
Other Loans 1% $2,386
Pell Grants 60% $3,179
State and Local Scholarships/Grants 14% $3,095
Student Loans 62% $7,179

Financial Aid Websites

Learn more about financial aid at http://www.umuc.edu/students/aid/index.cfm.

Estimate the net price for you at http://www.umuc.edu/students/aid/applyforaid/netpricecalc.cfm.

Alumni and Outcomes

Alumni and Outcomes

Graduation Rates

2% of students graduated in six years.

36% of full time students continued studying at this school after freshman year.

Salaries

The typical (median) early career salary of University of Maryland-University College graduates is $48,900, according to Payscale.

Rankings

Bloomberg

#39 Businessweek Undergraduate Business School Program

PayScale

#268 Starting Median Salary Rankings

Washington Monthly

#30 Master's Universities - Federal Work-Study Funds Spent on Service Rank
#310 Master's Universities - Service Staff, Courses, and Financial Aid Rank
#312 Master's Universities - Community Service Participation Rank
#346 Master's Universities - Research Expenditures Rank
#379 Master's Universities - ROTC Rank
#500 Master's Universities - Peace Corps Rank
#563 Master's Universities - Bachelor's to PhD Rank
#660 Master's Universities - Overall Rank
#671 Master's Universities - Graduation Rate Rank
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