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University of Phoenix-Milwaukee Campus

University of Phoenix-Milwaukee Campus is college with 256 students located in Brookfield, WI.

Business School, Open Admissions

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University of Phoenix-Milwaukee Campus's Full Profile

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Overview

Overview

University of Phoenix-Milwaukee Campus says

Brookfield, Wisconsin is home to the Milwaukee Campus of University of Phoenix. This campus offers a range of undergraduate and graduate degree programs in business and management, as well as other fields. Programs are designed for busy individuals just like yourself. Each class offered at the Milwaukee Campus features the flexibility and convenience that University of Phoenix in Wisconsin provides.

Students who enroll at the Milwaukee Campus can strike a balance between college and professional or personal commitments. Campus-based classes meet once per week, usually in the evening. Students also meet with their learning team, a small group of classmates, once a week to complete assignments while developing collaboration, problem-solving and communication skills. In addition to the on-campus bachelor's and master's degree programs, the Milwaukee Campus also offers a range of online degree programs. Online bachelor's programs are available through our Online Campus in areas such as business and management, criminal justice, human services, and nursing and health care.

Students who have already earned bachelor's degrees but want the flexibility of learning through an online format can pursue master's degrees in either business or technology. Online students can log in and learn at times and places convenient for them.

At both the undergraduate and graduate level, students take just one course at a time, enabling them to focus their learning while meeting their other commitments. Additionally, students learn from University of Phoenix faculty members who hold advanced degrees and have substantial experience in the fields they teach. Students often can earn their degrees sooner than they may think.

Student Life

Student Life

Student Body

Total Undergraduates 256
Gender 33% Male / 67% Female
Socio-Economic Diversity 75% of students received Pell Grants, which are provided by the U.S. government to students from middle and lower income families. It gives you an idea of a school’s socio-economic diversity.
Ethnic Diversity
Percentage
White 28%
Multi-racial 2%
Hispanic/Latino 2%
Ethnicity Unknown 30%
Black or African American 36%
Asian 1%
American Indian or Alaska Native 1%

Student Services

  • Career And Alumni Services
  • Libraries

Academics

Academics

Popular Majors

Business Administration and Management (80%), Computer Programming/Programmer (4%), Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration (4%), Public Administration (4%), Operations Management and Supervision (4%), Accounting and Business/Management (4%)

Majors Offered

Bachelor's

An integrated or combined program in accounting and business administration/management that prepares individuals to function as accountants and business managers.

Job Opportunities:

Financial Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate accounting, investing, banking, insurance, securities, and other financial activities of a branch, office, or department of an establishment.
Accountants and Auditors
Examine, analyze, and interpret accounting records to prepare financial statements, give advice, or audit and evaluate statements prepared by others. Install or advise on systems of recording costs or other financial and budgetary data.
Financial Analysts
Conduct quantitative analyses of information affecting investment programs of public or private institutions.

A program that generally prepares individuals to plan, organize, direct, and control the functions and processes of a firm or organization. Includes instruction in management theory, human resources management and behavior, accounting and other quantitative methods, purchasing and logistics, organization and production, marketing, and business decision-making.

Job Opportunities:

Chief Executives
Determine and formulate policies and provide overall direction of companies or private and public sector organizations within guidelines set up by a board of directors or similar governing body. Plan, direct, or coordinate operational activities at the highest level of management with the help of subordinate executives and staff managers.
General and Operations Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate the operations of public or private sector organizations. Duties and responsibilities include formulating policies, managing daily operations, and planning the use of materials and human resources, but are too diverse and general in nature to be classified in any one functional area of management or administration, such as personnel, purchasing, or administrative services.
Sales Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate the actual distribution or movement of a product or service to the customer. Coordinate sales distribution by establishing sales territories, quotas, and goals and establish training programs for sales representatives. Analyze sales statistics gathered by staff to determine sales potential and inventory requirements and monitor the preferences of customers.
Administrative Services Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate one or more administrative services of an organization, such as records and information management, mail distribution, facilities planning and maintenance, custodial operations, and other office support services.
Industrial Production Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate the work activities and resources necessary for manufacturing products in accordance with cost, quality, and quantity specifications.
Transportation, Storage, and Distribution Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate transportation, storage, or distribution activities in accordance with organizational policies and applicable government laws or regulations. Includes logistics managers.
Construction Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate, usually through subordinate supervisory personnel, activities concerned with the construction and maintenance of structures, facilities, and systems. Participate in the conceptual development of a construction project and oversee its organization, scheduling, budgeting, and implementation. Includes managers in specialized construction fields, such as carpentry or plumbing.
Social and Community Service Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate the activities of a social service program or community outreach organization. Oversee the program or organization's budget and policies regarding participant involvement, program requirements, and benefits. Work may involve directing social workers, counselors, or probation officers.
Managers, All Other
All managers not listed separately.
Cost Estimators
Prepare cost estimates for product manufacturing, construction projects, or services to aid management in bidding on or determining price of product or service. May specialize according to particular service performed or type of product manufactured.
Management Analysts
Conduct organizational studies and evaluations, design systems and procedures, conduct work simplification and measurement studies, and prepare operations and procedures manuals to assist management in operating more efficiently and effectively. Includes program analysts and management consultants.
Business Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in business administration and management, such as accounting, finance, human resources, labor and industrial relations, marketing, and operations research. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.

A program that prepares individuals to manage and direct the physical and/or technical functions of a firm or organization, particularly those relating to development, production, and manufacturing. Includes instruction in principles of general management, manufacturing and production systems, plant management, equipment maintenance management, production control, industrial labor relations and skilled trades supervision, strategic manufacturing policy, systems analysis, productivity analysis and cost control, and materials planning.

Job Opportunities:

Computer and Information Systems Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate activities in such fields as electronic data processing, information systems, systems analysis, and computer programming.
Industrial Production Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate the work activities and resources necessary for manufacturing products in accordance with cost, quality, and quantity specifications.
Construction Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate, usually through subordinate supervisory personnel, activities concerned with the construction and maintenance of structures, facilities, and systems. Participate in the conceptual development of a construction project and oversee its organization, scheduling, budgeting, and implementation. Includes managers in specialized construction fields, such as carpentry or plumbing.
Logisticians
Analyze and coordinate the logistical functions of a firm or organization. Responsible for the entire life cycle of a product, including acquisition, distribution, internal allocation, delivery, and final disposal of resources.
Business Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in business administration and management, such as accounting, finance, human resources, labor and industrial relations, marketing, and operations research. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.
First-Line Supervisors of Mechanics, Installers, and Repairers
Directly supervise and coordinate the activities of mechanics, installers, and repairers.
First-Line Supervisors of Production and Operating Workers
Directly supervise and coordinate the activities of production and operating workers, such as inspectors, precision workers, machine setters and operators, assemblers, fabricators, and plant and system operators.

Bachelor's

A program that prepares individuals to apply theories and practices of organization management and criminal justice to the administration of public law enforcement agencies and operations. Includes instruction in law enforcement history and theory, operational command leadership, administration of public police organizations, labor relations, incident response strategies, legal and regulatory responsibilities, budgeting, public relations, and organizational leadership.

Job Opportunities:

Managers, All Other
All managers not listed separately.
Criminal Justice and Law Enforcement Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in criminal justice, corrections, and law enforcement administration. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.
First-Line Supervisors of Police and Detectives
Directly supervise and coordinate activities of members of police force.

A program that prepares individuals to serve as managers in the executive arm of local, state, and federal government and that focuses on the systematic study of executive organization and management. Includes instruction in the roles, development, and principles of public administration; the management of public policy; executive-legislative relations; public budgetary processes and financial management; administrative law; public personnel management; professional ethics; and research methods.

Job Opportunities:

Chief Executives
Determine and formulate policies and provide overall direction of companies or private and public sector organizations within guidelines set up by a board of directors or similar governing body. Plan, direct, or coordinate operational activities at the highest level of management with the help of subordinate executives and staff managers.
General and Operations Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate the operations of public or private sector organizations. Duties and responsibilities include formulating policies, managing daily operations, and planning the use of materials and human resources, but are too diverse and general in nature to be classified in any one functional area of management or administration, such as personnel, purchasing, or administrative services.
Legislators
Develop, introduce or enact laws and statutes at the local, tribal, State, or Federal level. Includes only workers in elected positions.
Transportation, Storage, and Distribution Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate transportation, storage, or distribution activities in accordance with organizational policies and applicable government laws or regulations. Includes logistics managers.
Postmasters and Mail Superintendents
Plan, direct, or coordinate operational, administrative, management, and supportive services of a U.S. post office; or coordinate activities of workers engaged in postal and related work in assigned post office.
Social and Community Service Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate the activities of a social service program or community outreach organization. Oversee the program or organization's budget and policies regarding participant involvement, program requirements, and benefits. Work may involve directing social workers, counselors, or probation officers.
Managers, All Other
All managers not listed separately.

Bachelor's

A program that focuses on the general writing and implementation of generic and customized programs to drive operating systems and that generally prepares individuals to apply the methods and procedures of software design and programming to software installation and maintenance. Includes instruction in software design, low- and high-level languages and program writing; program customization and linking; prototype testing; troubleshooting; and related aspects of operating systems and networks.

Job Opportunities:

Computer Programmers
Create, modify, and test the code, forms, and script that allow computer applications to run. Work from specifications drawn up by software developers or other individuals. May assist software developers by analyzing user needs and designing software solutions. May develop and write computer programs to store, locate, and retrieve specific documents, data, and information.
Software Developers, Applications
Develop, create, and modify general computer applications software or specialized utility programs. Analyze user needs and develop software solutions. Design software or customize software for client use with the aim of optimizing operational efficiency. May analyze and design databases within an application area, working individually or coordinating database development as part of a team. May supervise computer programmers.
Software Developers, Systems Software
Research, design, develop, and test operating systems-level software, compilers, and network distribution software for medical, industrial, military, communications, aerospace, business, scientific, and general computing applications. Set operational specifications and formulate and analyze software requirements. May design embedded systems software. Apply principles and techniques of computer science, engineering, and mathematical analysis.
Web Developers
Design, create, and modify Web sites. Analyze user needs to implement Web site content, graphics, performance, and capacity. May integrate Web sites with other computer applications. May convert written, graphic, audio, and video components to compatible Web formats by using software designed to facilitate the creation of Web and multimedia content.
Computer Network Support Specialists
Analyze, test, troubleshoot, and evaluate existing network systems, such as local area network (LAN), wide area network (WAN), and Internet systems or a segment of a network system. Perform network maintenance to ensure networks operate correctly with minimal interruption.
Computer Science Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in computer science. May specialize in a field of computer science, such as the design and function of computers or operations and research analysis. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.

Administration & Faculty

President William Pepicello, PhD
Accredited by North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, The Higher Learning Commission
Full-time Faculty 7
Student : Faculty Ratio 7 : 1
Faculty Gender (% Male : Female) 42 : 57
Percentage of Faculty Members
Non-Tenure Track Faculty 100

Admissions

Admissions

Selectivity

Finance

Finance

Average Net Tuition

The average student pays $19,495 for tuition, fees, and other expenses, after grants and scholarships.

Household Income Real Cost
$0-$30K $19,734
$30K-$48K $20,232
$75K-$110K $24,282

Sticker Price

Total stated tuition is $10,560, in-state and on-campus, before financial aid.

On-Campus Off-Campus
Stated Tuition $10,907 Same as On-Campus
Fees $760 Same as On-Campus
Housing N/A $6,230
Books N/A N/A
Total (before financial aid) $11,667 $17,897

Students Receiving Aid

88% of students receive some form of financial aid.

Undergrads Receiving Aid Average Aid Amount
Federal Loans 93% $7,641
Federal Scholarships/Grants 75% $5,261
Institutional Grants 25% $846
Other Federal Grants 4% $500
Pell Grants 75% $5,238
Student Loans 93% $7,641

Financial Aid Websites

Learn more about financial aid at http://faw.phoenix.edu.

Estimate the net price for you at http://www.phoenix.edu/tuition_and_financial_options/tuition_and_fees.html.

Alumni and Outcomes

Alumni and Outcomes

Graduation Rates

18% of students graduated in six years.

39% of full time students continued studying at this school after freshman year.

Rankings

Washington Monthly

#76 National Universities - Federal Work-Study Funds Spent on Service Rank
#113 National Universities - Science & engineering PhD's awarded Rank
#142 National Universities - Peace Corps Rank
#147 National Universities - Research Expenditures Rank
#148 National Universities - Faculty National Academies Rank
#166 National Universities - Faculty Awards Rank
#172 National Universities - Community Service Participation Rank
#174 National Universities - Service Staff, Courses, and Financial Aid Rank
#191 National Universities - Graduation Rate Rank
#219 National Universities - Bachelor's to PhD Rank
#220 National Universities - ROTC Rank
#238 National Universities - Overall Rank
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