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At A Glance

Alaska Pacific University

Trees and lakes surround this scenic campus - located just ten minutes from downtown Anchorage - and moose occasionally drop by and hang out. If you visit APU and end up enrolling as a new student, the university will credit $2,000 of your plane ticket cost to your tuition. So, save your ticket stub, and may we also suggest that you fly first class.

46
Selectivity
58
Influence
Heavy Focus on Undergraduate Professions, Master's University, Religiously affiliated, Focus on Undergraduate Arts and Science

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Alaska Pacific University's Full Profile

Also Consider

Also Consider

Overview

Overview

Noodle Says

Trees and lakes surround this scenic campus - located just ten minutes from downtown Anchorage - and moose occasionally drop by and hang out. If you visit APU and end up enrolling as a new student, the university will credit $2,000 of your plane ticket cost to your tuition. So, save your ticket stub, and may we also suggest that you fly first class.

Alaska Pacific University says

Alaska Pacific University is an intentionally small, private, independent university devoted to innovative teaching and learning, where students receive personal attention in small classes and acquire leadership capabilities, moral character, and self-direction through active learning. To achieve these educational goals Alaska Pacific University:

Nurtures spiritual and moral values consistent with the university's Christian heritage while respecting the religious convictions of all. Emphasizes personal growth through student-centered, experiential education using Alaska, the Arctic, and the Pacific Rim as laboratories for learning; Develops leadership for active service to society by encouraging openness to positive change, environmental awareness, innovation, and individual initiative; Promotes international and multicultural education while welcoming learners of all ages: from Alaska, with a special commitment to Alaska Natives; from other states of the United States; and from the international community; Maintains academic excellence by combining the breadth, integrative understanding, and critical thinking of the liberal arts with practice and focused knowledge for professional careers.

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Student Life

Student Life

Student Body

Total Undergraduates 387
Gender 34% Male / 66% Female
Enrollment Breakdown 64% Full Time / 36% Part Time
Geography 75% In State / 25% Out of State / % International
Socio-Economic Diversity 42% of students received Pell Grants, which are provided by the U.S. government to students from middle and lower income families. It gives you an idea of a school’s socio-economic diversity.
Ethnic Diversity
Percentage
White 51%
Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander 1%
Multi-racial 11%
Hispanic/Latino 4%
Ethnicity Unknown 15%
Black or African American 3%
Asian 2%
American Indian or Alaska Native 12%

Housing

Campus housing is available for undergraduates. Housing deposit : $300.00. Housing deposit due : Apr 30. Freshman allowed to have car. No pets.

26% of students live on-campus.

95% of freshman live on-campus.

  • Coed Dorms
  • Housing Offered
  • Theme Housing

Activities

Student Publications: The Journal

  • Government or Political Activity
  • International Student Organization
  • Literary Magazine
  • Student Newspaper
  • Yearbook
  • Choral Groups
  • Music Ensembles
  • Drama/Theater
  • Campus Ministries

Student Services

  • Academic Support Services: learning center reduced course load remedial instruction study skills assistance tutoring writing center
  • Computer Services: computer center, dorms, libraries, student center dorms wired for high speed internet connections student web hosting available wireless network available
  • Counseling Services: chaplain/spiritual director career counseling employment services for undergraduates minority students services personal counseling financial aid counseling
  • Facilities: climbing wall, walking trails, lake for canoeing and kayaking, alaskan collection
  • Special Needs Services: partial services for students with learning disabilities wheelchair accessibility
  • Specialty Programs (ROTC, Accelerated Programs, Professional Development, etc.): accelerated program double major independent study internships student-designed major teacher certification visiting/exchange student program
  • Transfer In Services
  • Transfer Out Services

Academics

Academics

Popular Majors

Business Administration and Management (16%), Marine Biology and Biological Oceanography (13%), Parks, Recreation and Leisure Studies (11%), Environmental Science (9%), Liberal Arts and Sciences/Liberal Studies (9%), Counseling Psychology (7%)

Majors Offered

Bachelor's

A program that is a structured combination of the arts, biological and physical sciences, social sciences, and humanities, emphasizing breadth of study. Includes instruction in independently designed, individualized, or regular programs.

Job Opportunities:

Postsecondary Teachers, All Other
All postsecondary teachers not listed separately.

Bachelor's

A program that prepares individuals to practice the profession of accounting and to perform related business functions. Includes instruction in accounting principles and theory, financial accounting, managerial accounting, cost accounting, budget control, tax accounting, legal aspects of accounting, auditing, reporting procedures, statement analysis, planning and consulting, business information systems, accounting research methods, professional standards and ethics, and applications to specific for-profit, public, and non-profit organizations.

Job Opportunities:

Accountants and Auditors
Examine, analyze, and interpret accounting records to prepare financial statements, give advice, or audit and evaluate statements prepared by others. Install or advise on systems of recording costs or other financial and budgetary data.
Budget Analysts
Examine budget estimates for completeness, accuracy, and conformance with procedures and regulations. Analyze budgeting and accounting reports.
Credit Analysts
Analyze credit data and financial statements of individuals or firms to determine the degree of risk involved in extending credit or lending money. Prepare reports with credit information for use in decision making.
Financial Examiners
Enforce or ensure compliance with laws and regulations governing financial and securities institutions and financial and real estate transactions. May examine, verify, or authenticate records.
Tax Examiners and Collectors, and Revenue Agents
Determine tax liability or collect taxes from individuals or business firms according to prescribed laws and regulations.
Business Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in business administration and management, such as accounting, finance, human resources, labor and industrial relations, marketing, and operations research. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.

An integrated or combined program in accounting and business administration/management that prepares individuals to function as accountants and business managers.

Job Opportunities:

Financial Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate accounting, investing, banking, insurance, securities, and other financial activities of a branch, office, or department of an establishment.
Accountants and Auditors
Examine, analyze, and interpret accounting records to prepare financial statements, give advice, or audit and evaluate statements prepared by others. Install or advise on systems of recording costs or other financial and budgetary data.
Financial Analysts
Conduct quantitative analyses of information affecting investment programs of public or private institutions.

A program that generally prepares individuals to plan, organize, direct, and control the functions and processes of a firm or organization. Includes instruction in management theory, human resources management and behavior, accounting and other quantitative methods, purchasing and logistics, organization and production, marketing, and business decision-making.

Job Opportunities:

Chief Executives
Determine and formulate policies and provide overall direction of companies or private and public sector organizations within guidelines set up by a board of directors or similar governing body. Plan, direct, or coordinate operational activities at the highest level of management with the help of subordinate executives and staff managers.
General and Operations Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate the operations of public or private sector organizations. Duties and responsibilities include formulating policies, managing daily operations, and planning the use of materials and human resources, but are too diverse and general in nature to be classified in any one functional area of management or administration, such as personnel, purchasing, or administrative services.
Sales Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate the actual distribution or movement of a product or service to the customer. Coordinate sales distribution by establishing sales territories, quotas, and goals and establish training programs for sales representatives. Analyze sales statistics gathered by staff to determine sales potential and inventory requirements and monitor the preferences of customers.
Administrative Services Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate one or more administrative services of an organization, such as records and information management, mail distribution, facilities planning and maintenance, custodial operations, and other office support services.
Industrial Production Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate the work activities and resources necessary for manufacturing products in accordance with cost, quality, and quantity specifications.
Transportation, Storage, and Distribution Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate transportation, storage, or distribution activities in accordance with organizational policies and applicable government laws or regulations. Includes logistics managers.
Construction Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate, usually through subordinate supervisory personnel, activities concerned with the construction and maintenance of structures, facilities, and systems. Participate in the conceptual development of a construction project and oversee its organization, scheduling, budgeting, and implementation. Includes managers in specialized construction fields, such as carpentry or plumbing.
Social and Community Service Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate the activities of a social service program or community outreach organization. Oversee the program or organization's budget and policies regarding participant involvement, program requirements, and benefits. Work may involve directing social workers, counselors, or probation officers.
Managers, All Other
All managers not listed separately.
Cost Estimators
Prepare cost estimates for product manufacturing, construction projects, or services to aid management in bidding on or determining price of product or service. May specialize according to particular service performed or type of product manufactured.
Management Analysts
Conduct organizational studies and evaluations, design systems and procedures, conduct work simplification and measurement studies, and prepare operations and procedures manuals to assist management in operating more efficiently and effectively. Includes program analysts and management consultants.
Business Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in business administration and management, such as accounting, finance, human resources, labor and industrial relations, marketing, and operations research. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.

A program that prepares individuals to manage the business affairs of non-profit corporations, including foundations, educational institutions, associations, and other such organizations, and public agencies and governmental operations. Includes instruction in business management, principles of public administration, principles of accounting and financial management, human resources management, taxation of non-profit organizations, and business law as applied to non-profit organizations.

Job Opportunities:

Social and Community Service Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate the activities of a social service program or community outreach organization. Oversee the program or organization's budget and policies regarding participant involvement, program requirements, and benefits. Work may involve directing social workers, counselors, or probation officers.
Managers, All Other
All managers not listed separately.

Associates

A program that prepares individuals to practice the profession of accounting and to perform related business functions. Includes instruction in accounting principles and theory, financial accounting, managerial accounting, cost accounting, budget control, tax accounting, legal aspects of accounting, auditing, reporting procedures, statement analysis, planning and consulting, business information systems, accounting research methods, professional standards and ethics, and applications to specific for-profit, public, and non-profit organizations.

Job Opportunities:

Accountants and Auditors
Examine, analyze, and interpret accounting records to prepare financial statements, give advice, or audit and evaluate statements prepared by others. Install or advise on systems of recording costs or other financial and budgetary data.
Budget Analysts
Examine budget estimates for completeness, accuracy, and conformance with procedures and regulations. Analyze budgeting and accounting reports.
Credit Analysts
Analyze credit data and financial statements of individuals or firms to determine the degree of risk involved in extending credit or lending money. Prepare reports with credit information for use in decision making.
Financial Examiners
Enforce or ensure compliance with laws and regulations governing financial and securities institutions and financial and real estate transactions. May examine, verify, or authenticate records.
Tax Examiners and Collectors, and Revenue Agents
Determine tax liability or collect taxes from individuals or business firms according to prescribed laws and regulations.
Business Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in business administration and management, such as accounting, finance, human resources, labor and industrial relations, marketing, and operations research. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.

A program that generally prepares individuals to plan, organize, direct, and control the functions and processes of a firm or organization. Includes instruction in management theory, human resources management and behavior, accounting and other quantitative methods, purchasing and logistics, organization and production, marketing, and business decision-making.

Job Opportunities:

Chief Executives
Determine and formulate policies and provide overall direction of companies or private and public sector organizations within guidelines set up by a board of directors or similar governing body. Plan, direct, or coordinate operational activities at the highest level of management with the help of subordinate executives and staff managers.
General and Operations Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate the operations of public or private sector organizations. Duties and responsibilities include formulating policies, managing daily operations, and planning the use of materials and human resources, but are too diverse and general in nature to be classified in any one functional area of management or administration, such as personnel, purchasing, or administrative services.
Sales Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate the actual distribution or movement of a product or service to the customer. Coordinate sales distribution by establishing sales territories, quotas, and goals and establish training programs for sales representatives. Analyze sales statistics gathered by staff to determine sales potential and inventory requirements and monitor the preferences of customers.
Administrative Services Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate one or more administrative services of an organization, such as records and information management, mail distribution, facilities planning and maintenance, custodial operations, and other office support services.
Industrial Production Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate the work activities and resources necessary for manufacturing products in accordance with cost, quality, and quantity specifications.
Transportation, Storage, and Distribution Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate transportation, storage, or distribution activities in accordance with organizational policies and applicable government laws or regulations. Includes logistics managers.
Construction Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate, usually through subordinate supervisory personnel, activities concerned with the construction and maintenance of structures, facilities, and systems. Participate in the conceptual development of a construction project and oversee its organization, scheduling, budgeting, and implementation. Includes managers in specialized construction fields, such as carpentry or plumbing.
Social and Community Service Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate the activities of a social service program or community outreach organization. Oversee the program or organization's budget and policies regarding participant involvement, program requirements, and benefits. Work may involve directing social workers, counselors, or probation officers.
Managers, All Other
All managers not listed separately.
Cost Estimators
Prepare cost estimates for product manufacturing, construction projects, or services to aid management in bidding on or determining price of product or service. May specialize according to particular service performed or type of product manufactured.
Management Analysts
Conduct organizational studies and evaluations, design systems and procedures, conduct work simplification and measurement studies, and prepare operations and procedures manuals to assist management in operating more efficiently and effectively. Includes program analysts and management consultants.
Business Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in business administration and management, such as accounting, finance, human resources, labor and industrial relations, marketing, and operations research. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.

Bachelor's

A program that prepares individuals to teach students at more than one educational level, such as a combined program in elementary/secondary, early childhood/elementary, elementary/middle school, or junior high/high school teacher education.

Job Opportunities:

Elementary School Teachers, Except Special Education
Teach students basic academic, social, and other formative skills in public or private schools at the elementary level.
Secondary School Teachers, Except Special and Career/Technical Education
Teach students in one or more subjects, such as English, mathematics, or social studies at the secondary level in public or private schools. May be designated according to subject matter specialty.

Associates

A program that prepares individuals to teach students at more than one educational level, such as a combined program in elementary/secondary, early childhood/elementary, elementary/middle school, or junior high/high school teacher education.

Job Opportunities:

Elementary School Teachers, Except Special Education
Teach students basic academic, social, and other formative skills in public or private schools at the elementary level.
Secondary School Teachers, Except Special and Career/Technical Education
Teach students in one or more subjects, such as English, mathematics, or social studies at the secondary level in public or private schools. May be designated according to subject matter specialty.

A program that prepares individuals to teach technology education/industrial arts programs at various educational levels.

Job Opportunities:

Education Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses pertaining to education, such as counseling, curriculum, guidance, instruction, teacher education, and teaching English as a second language. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.
Vocational Education Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach or instruct vocational or occupational subjects at the postsecondary level (but at less than the baccalaureate) to students who have graduated or left high school. Includes correspondence school, industrial, and commercial instructors; and adult education teachers and instructors who prepare persons to operate industrial machinery and equipment and transportation and communications equipment. Teaching may take place in public or private schools whose primary business is education or in a school associated with an organization whose primary business is other than education.
Middle School Teachers, Except Special and Career/Technical Education
Teach students in one or more subjects in public or private schools at the middle, intermediate, or junior high level, which falls between elementary and senior high school as defined by applicable laws and regulations.
Career/Technical Education Teachers, Middle School
Teach occupational, career and technical, or vocational subjects in public or private schools at the middle, intermediate, or junior high level, which falls between elementary and senior high school as defined by applicable laws and regulations.
Secondary School Teachers, Except Special and Career/Technical Education
Teach students in one or more subjects, such as English, mathematics, or social studies at the secondary level in public or private schools. May be designated according to subject matter specialty.
Career/Technical Education Teachers, Secondary School
Teach occupational, career and technical, or vocational subjects at the secondary school level in public or private schools.

Bachelor's

A program that focuses on the application of policy analysis, public administration, business management, and communications to the planning and management of health services delivery systems in the public and private sectors, and prepares individuals to function as health services administrators and managers. Includes instruction in health systems planning, public health organization and management, pubic health policy formulation and analysis, finance, business and operations management, economics of health care, organizational and health communications, marketing, human resources management, and public health law and regulations.

Job Opportunities:

Medical and Health Services Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate medical and health services in hospitals, clinics, managed care organizations, public health agencies, or similar organizations.

Bachelor's

A program that focuses on the concept of sustainability from an interdisciplinary perspective. Includes instruction in sustainable development, environmental policies, ethics, ecology, landscape architecture, city and regional planning, economics, natural resources, sociology, and anthropology.

Job Opportunities:

Postsecondary Teachers, All Other
All postsecondary teachers not listed separately.

Bachelor's

A program that focuses on the general study and provision of human and social services to individuals and communities and prepares individuals to work in public and private human services agencies and organizations. Includes instruction in the social sciences, psychology, principles of social service, human services policy, planning and evaluation, social services law and administration, and applications to particular issues, services, localities, and populations.

Job Opportunities:

Social and Community Service Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate the activities of a social service program or community outreach organization. Oversee the program or organization's budget and policies regarding participant involvement, program requirements, and benefits. Work may involve directing social workers, counselors, or probation officers.
Social and Human Service Assistants
Assist in providing client services in a wide variety of fields, such as psychology, rehabilitation, or social work, including support for families. May assist clients in identifying and obtaining available benefits and social and community services. May assist social workers with developing, organizing, and conducting programs to prevent and resolve problems relevant to substance abuse, human relationships, rehabilitation, or dependent care.
Community and Social Service Specialists, All Other
All community and social service specialists not listed separately.

A program that focuses on the principles underlying recreational and leisure activities, and the practices involved in providing indoor and outdoor recreational facilities and services for the general public.

Job Opportunities:

Recreation and Fitness Studies Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses pertaining to recreation, leisure, and fitness studies, including exercise physiology and facilities management. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.

Associates

A program that focuses on the general study and provision of human and social services to individuals and communities and prepares individuals to work in public and private human services agencies and organizations. Includes instruction in the social sciences, psychology, principles of social service, human services policy, planning and evaluation, social services law and administration, and applications to particular issues, services, localities, and populations.

Job Opportunities:

Social and Community Service Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate the activities of a social service program or community outreach organization. Oversee the program or organization's budget and policies regarding participant involvement, program requirements, and benefits. Work may involve directing social workers, counselors, or probation officers.
Social and Human Service Assistants
Assist in providing client services in a wide variety of fields, such as psychology, rehabilitation, or social work, including support for families. May assist clients in identifying and obtaining available benefits and social and community services. May assist social workers with developing, organizing, and conducting programs to prevent and resolve problems relevant to substance abuse, human relationships, rehabilitation, or dependent care.
Community and Social Service Specialists, All Other
All community and social service specialists not listed separately.

Bachelor's

A program that focuses on the application of biological, chemical, and physical principles to the study of the physical environment and the solution of environmental problems, including subjects such as abating or controlling environmental pollution and degradation; the interaction between human society and the natural environment; and natural resources management. Includes instruction in biology, chemistry, physics, geosciences, climatology, statistics, and mathematical modeling.

Job Opportunities:

Environmental Scientists and Specialists, Including Health
Conduct research or perform investigation for the purpose of identifying, abating, or eliminating sources of pollutants or hazards that affect either the environment or the health of the population. Using knowledge of various scientific disciplines, may collect, synthesize, study, report, and recommend action based on data derived from measurements or observations of air, food, soil, water, and other sources.
Environmental Science Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in environmental science. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.

A program that focuses on environment-related issues using scientific, social scientific, or humanistic approaches or a combination. Includes instruction in the basic principles of ecology and environmental science and related subjects such as policy, politics, law, economics, social aspects, planning, pollution control, natural resources, and the interactions of human beings and nature.

Job Opportunities:

Environmental Scientists and Specialists, Including Health
Conduct research or perform investigation for the purpose of identifying, abating, or eliminating sources of pollutants or hazards that affect either the environment or the health of the population. Using knowledge of various scientific disciplines, may collect, synthesize, study, report, and recommend action based on data derived from measurements or observations of air, food, soil, water, and other sources.
Environmental Science Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in environmental science. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.

A program that focuses on the scientific study of the earth; the forces acting upon it; and the behavior of the solids, liquids and gases comprising it. Includes instruction in historical geology, geomorphology, and sedimentology, the chemistry of rocks and soils, stratigraphy, mineralogy, petrology, geostatistics, volcanology, glaciology, geophysical principles, and applications to research and industrial problems.

Job Opportunities:

Natural Sciences Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate activities in such fields as life sciences, physical sciences, mathematics, statistics, and research and development in these fields.
Geoscientists, Except Hydrologists and Geographers
Study the composition, structure, and other physical aspects of the Earth. May use geological, physics, and mathematics knowledge in exploration for oil, gas, minerals, or underground water; or in waste disposal, land reclamation, or other environmental problems. May study the Earth's internal composition, atmospheres, oceans, and its magnetic, electrical, and gravitational forces. Includes mineralogists, crystallographers, paleontologists, stratigraphers, geodesists, and seismologists.
Hydrologists
Research the distribution, circulation, and physical properties of underground and surface waters; and study the form and intensity of precipitation, its rate of infiltration into the soil, movement through the earth, and its return to the ocean and atmosphere.
Atmospheric, Earth, Marine, and Space Sciences Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in the physical sciences, except chemistry and physics. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching, and those who do a combination of teaching and research.

A program that focuses on the scientific study of the ecology and behavior of microbes, plants, and animals inhabiting oceans, coastal waters, and saltwater wetlands and their interactions with the physical environment. Includes instruction in chemical, physical, and geological oceanography; molecular, cellular, and biochemical studies; marine microbiology; marine botany; ichthyology; mammalogy; marine population dynamics and biodiversity; reproductive biology; studies of specific species, phyla, habitats, and ecosystems; marine paleocology and palentology; and applications to fields such as fisheries science and biotechnology.

Job Opportunities:

Natural Sciences Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate activities in such fields as life sciences, physical sciences, mathematics, statistics, and research and development in these fields.
Biological Scientists, All Other
All biological scientists not listed separately.
Biological Science Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in biological sciences. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.

A program that prepares individuals to plan, develop, manage, and evaluate programs to protect and regulate natural habitats and renewable natural resources. Includes instruction in the principles of wildlife and conservation biology, environmental science, animal population surveying, natural resource economics, management techniques for various habitats, applicable law and policy, administrative and communications skills, and public relations.

Job Opportunities:

Conservation Scientists
Manage, improve, and protect natural resources to maximize their use without damaging the environment. May conduct soil surveys and develop plans to eliminate soil erosion or to protect rangelands. May instruct farmers, agricultural production managers, or ranchers in best ways to use crop rotation, contour plowing, or terracing to conserve soil and water; in the number and kind of livestock and forage plants best suited to particular ranges; and in range and farm improvements, such as fencing and reservoirs for stock watering.
Foresters
Manage public and private forested lands for economic, recreational, and conservation purposes. May inventory the type, amount, and location of standing timber, appraise the timber's worth, negotiate the purchase, and draw up contracts for procurement. May determine how to conserve wildlife habitats, creek beds, water quality, and soil stability, and how best to comply with environmental regulations. May devise plans for planting and growing new trees, monitor trees for healthy growth, and determine optimal harvesting schedules.
Forestry and Conservation Science Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in forestry and conservation science. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.

Bachelor's

A program that prepares individuals for the independent professional practice of psychological counseling, involving the rendering of therapeutic services to individuals and groups experiencing psychological problems and exhibiting distress symptoms. Includes instruction in counseling theory, therapeutic intervention strategies, patient/counselor relationships, testing and assessment methods and procedures, group therapy, marital and family therapy, child and adolescent therapy, supervised counseling practice, ethical standards, and applicable regulations.

Job Opportunities:

Managers, All Other
All managers not listed separately.
Clinical, Counseling, and School Psychologists
Diagnose and treat mental disorders; learning disabilities; and cognitive, behavioral, and emotional problems, using individual, child, family, and group therapies. May design and implement behavior modification programs.
Psychology Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in psychology, such as child, clinical, and developmental psychology, and psychological counseling. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.

Administration & Faculty

President Don Bantz
Accredited by Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities
Full-time Faculty 47
Student : Faculty Ratio 8 : 1
Faculty Gender (% Male : Female) 48 : 51
Percentage of Faculty Members
Non-Tenure Track Faculty 100

Admissions

Admissions

Selectivity

Selectivity Score: 45/100
45
Selectivity

Acceptance Rate: 37.4% accepted of 494 applications

25th - 75th Percentile
ACTComposite20 - 24
English18 - 24
Math18 - 23
 
SATMath450 - 510
Reading465 - 575
Writing435 - 568

Admission Considerations

Very Important: Academic GPA, Rigor Of Secondary School Record, Application Essay

Important: Standardized Test Scores, Alumni Relation, Level Of Applicants Interest, Recommendations

Also Considered: Work Experience, Talent Ability, Character Personal Qualities, Extracurricular Activities, Volunteer Work

High School Curriculum (years of study):
Required Recommended
History 0 1
English 0 4
Math 0 3
Science 0 2
Science Lab 0 1
Social Studies 0 1
Foreign Language 0 2

Other Application Information: SAT or ACT

Admissions Websites

Finance

Finance

Average Net Tuition

The average student pays $32,131 for tuition, fees, and other expenses, after grants and scholarships.

Household Income Real Cost
$0-$30K $29,014
$30K-$48K $28,525
$48K-$75K $29,899
$75K-$110K $33,475
$110K+ $33,275

Sticker Price

Total stated tuition is $29,700, in-state and on-campus, before financial aid.

On-Campus Off-Campus
Stated Tuition $29,700 Same as On-Campus
Fees $110 Same as On-Campus
Housing $9,300 $14,200
Books $1,000 $1,000
Total (before financial aid) $40,110 $45,010

Students Receiving Aid

100% of students receive some form of financial aid.

Undergrads Receiving Aid Average Aid Amount
Federal Loans 58% $3,183
Federal Scholarships/Grants 42% $2,298
Institutional Grants 100% $8,922
Other Federal Grants 15% $400
Other Loans 4% $12,500
Pell Grants 42% $2,152
State and Local Scholarships/Grants 15% $1,932
Student Loans 58% $4,017

Financial Aid Websites

Learn more about financial aid at http://www.alaskapacific.edu/apply/financial-aid/.

Estimate the net price for you at http://my.alaskapacific.edu/uniquesigce3d1b55322415c149deda8964ead9cb/uniquesig0/secureinternalmyportalhomepage/.

Alumni and Outcomes

Alumni and Outcomes

Graduation Rates

24% of students graduated on time.

39% of students graduated in six years.

67% of full time students continued studying at this school after freshman year.

Rankings

U.S. News & World Report

#27 Regional Universities Overall Score
#75 Regional Universities West Rankings
#80 Regional Universities

WalletHub

#267 The Best and Worst College Cities and Towns in America

Washington Monthly

#3 Master's Universities - Peace Corps Rank
#52 Master's Universities - Federal Work-Study Funds Spent on Service Rank
#127 Master's Universities - Bachelor's to PhD Rank
#212 Master's Universities - Overall Rank
#265 Master's Universities - Research Expenditures Rank
#310 Master's Universities - Service Staff, Courses, and Financial Aid Rank
#312 Master's Universities - Community Service Participation Rank
#382 Best Bang for Buck Colleges - Overall Rank
#472 Master's Universities - ROTC Rank
#563 Master's Universities - Graduation Rate Rank
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