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Globe Institute of Technology

Globe Institute of Technology is college with 557 students located in New York, NY.

Business School, Open Admissions

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Globe Institute of Technology's Full Profile

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Also Consider

Overview

Overview

Globe Institute of Technology says

Globe Institute of Technology - Your Life, Your Dream, Your College

You know deep inside that you can be so much more. You just need to optimize your potential.

At Globe Institute of Technology, we see you as a complete person with real potential, with untapped talents that can be developed. Through the right Globe degree or certificate, we can help you attain your personal and career goals.

We want to be the training partner that helps you build the educational resources you need now to get the job you want and the earning security your family needs. We want to help keep you sharp and relevant in an ever-changing world.

Globe Institute of Technology features comprehensive and affordable certificate and degree programs in a wide variety of career fields, including:

Accounting Banking and Finance Business Management Healthcare Management Hospitality Management Information Technology Legal Office Management Management Information Systems Sports Science Management Computer Information Systems Computer Programming and Systems Design Please explore our site for more information about our course offerings and class schedules. If you're interested in earning your certificate or bachelor's degree in New York, our technology college could be right for you! We encourage you to visit us in our midtown Manhattan location, and speak with our faculty and staff. With Globe you can experience a small-college environment without sacrificing big-school resources. We would love to show it to you.

Welcome

Latest Tweet

Student Life

Student Life

Student Body

Total Undergraduates 557
Gender 64% Male / 36% Female
Enrollment Breakdown 96% Full Time / 4% Part Time
Geography 85% In State / 15% Out of State / 3% International
Socio-Economic Diversity 55% of students received Pell Grants, which are provided by the U.S. government to students from middle and lower income families. It gives you an idea of a school’s socio-economic diversity.
Ethnic Diversity
Percentage
White 12%
Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander 1%
International 4%
Hispanic/Latino 27%
Black or African American 50%
Asian 6%
American Indian or Alaska Native 0%

Housing

25% of students live on-campus.

  • Apartments for Single Students
  • Special Housing for International Students

Activities

  • Dance
  • Government or Political Activity
  • Yearbook
  • Choral Groups

Student Services

  • Academic Support Services: remedial instruction study skills assistance tutoring learning center pre-admission summer program reduced course load writing center
  • Computer Services: computer center, libraries, student center wireless network available dorms wired for high speed internet connections
  • Counseling Services: career counseling financial aid counseling placement services for graduates women's services economically disadvantaged students services employment services for undergraduates minority students services adult (re-entering) student services/programs
  • Facilities
  • Special Needs Services: partial services for students with learning disabilities wheelchair accessibility
  • Specialty Programs (ROTC, Accelerated Programs, Professional Development, etc.): english as a second language (esl) internships liberal arts/career combination independent study
  • Transfer In Services
  • Transfer Out Services

Academics

Academics

Popular Majors

Business, Management, Marketing, and Related Support Services, Other (42%), Business Administration and Management (15%), Computer Programming/Programmer (12%), Information Science/Studies (8%), Business Administration and Management (6%), Accounting (5%)

Majors Offered

Bachelor's

A program that prepares individuals to practice the profession of accounting and to perform related business functions. Includes instruction in accounting principles and theory, financial accounting, managerial accounting, cost accounting, budget control, tax accounting, legal aspects of accounting, auditing, reporting procedures, statement analysis, planning and consulting, business information systems, accounting research methods, professional standards and ethics, and applications to specific for-profit, public, and non-profit organizations.

Job Opportunities:

Accountants and Auditors
Examine, analyze, and interpret accounting records to prepare financial statements, give advice, or audit and evaluate statements prepared by others. Install or advise on systems of recording costs or other financial and budgetary data.
Budget Analysts
Examine budget estimates for completeness, accuracy, and conformance with procedures and regulations. Analyze budgeting and accounting reports.
Credit Analysts
Analyze credit data and financial statements of individuals or firms to determine the degree of risk involved in extending credit or lending money. Prepare reports with credit information for use in decision making.
Financial Examiners
Enforce or ensure compliance with laws and regulations governing financial and securities institutions and financial and real estate transactions. May examine, verify, or authenticate records.
Tax Examiners and Collectors, and Revenue Agents
Determine tax liability or collect taxes from individuals or business firms according to prescribed laws and regulations.
Business Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in business administration and management, such as accounting, finance, human resources, labor and industrial relations, marketing, and operations research. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.

A program that generally prepares individuals to plan, organize, direct, and control the functions and processes of a firm or organization. Includes instruction in management theory, human resources management and behavior, accounting and other quantitative methods, purchasing and logistics, organization and production, marketing, and business decision-making.

Job Opportunities:

Chief Executives
Determine and formulate policies and provide overall direction of companies or private and public sector organizations within guidelines set up by a board of directors or similar governing body. Plan, direct, or coordinate operational activities at the highest level of management with the help of subordinate executives and staff managers.
General and Operations Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate the operations of public or private sector organizations. Duties and responsibilities include formulating policies, managing daily operations, and planning the use of materials and human resources, but are too diverse and general in nature to be classified in any one functional area of management or administration, such as personnel, purchasing, or administrative services.
Sales Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate the actual distribution or movement of a product or service to the customer. Coordinate sales distribution by establishing sales territories, quotas, and goals and establish training programs for sales representatives. Analyze sales statistics gathered by staff to determine sales potential and inventory requirements and monitor the preferences of customers.
Administrative Services Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate one or more administrative services of an organization, such as records and information management, mail distribution, facilities planning and maintenance, custodial operations, and other office support services.
Industrial Production Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate the work activities and resources necessary for manufacturing products in accordance with cost, quality, and quantity specifications.
Transportation, Storage, and Distribution Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate transportation, storage, or distribution activities in accordance with organizational policies and applicable government laws or regulations. Includes logistics managers.
Construction Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate, usually through subordinate supervisory personnel, activities concerned with the construction and maintenance of structures, facilities, and systems. Participate in the conceptual development of a construction project and oversee its organization, scheduling, budgeting, and implementation. Includes managers in specialized construction fields, such as carpentry or plumbing.
Social and Community Service Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate the activities of a social service program or community outreach organization. Oversee the program or organization's budget and policies regarding participant involvement, program requirements, and benefits. Work may involve directing social workers, counselors, or probation officers.
Managers, All Other
All managers not listed separately.
Cost Estimators
Prepare cost estimates for product manufacturing, construction projects, or services to aid management in bidding on or determining price of product or service. May specialize according to particular service performed or type of product manufactured.
Management Analysts
Conduct organizational studies and evaluations, design systems and procedures, conduct work simplification and measurement studies, and prepare operations and procedures manuals to assist management in operating more efficiently and effectively. Includes program analysts and management consultants.
Business Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in business administration and management, such as accounting, finance, human resources, labor and industrial relations, marketing, and operations research. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.

A program that generally prepares individuals to plan, manage, and analyze the financial and monetary aspects and performance of business enterprises, banking institutions, or other organizations. Includes instruction in principles of accounting, financial instruments, capital planning, funds acquisition, asset and debt management, budgeting, financial analysis, and investments and portfolio management.

Job Opportunities:

Chief Executives
Determine and formulate policies and provide overall direction of companies or private and public sector organizations within guidelines set up by a board of directors or similar governing body. Plan, direct, or coordinate operational activities at the highest level of management with the help of subordinate executives and staff managers.
General and Operations Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate the operations of public or private sector organizations. Duties and responsibilities include formulating policies, managing daily operations, and planning the use of materials and human resources, but are too diverse and general in nature to be classified in any one functional area of management or administration, such as personnel, purchasing, or administrative services.
Financial Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate accounting, investing, banking, insurance, securities, and other financial activities of a branch, office, or department of an establishment.
Budget Analysts
Examine budget estimates for completeness, accuracy, and conformance with procedures and regulations. Analyze budgeting and accounting reports.
Credit Analysts
Analyze credit data and financial statements of individuals or firms to determine the degree of risk involved in extending credit or lending money. Prepare reports with credit information for use in decision making.
Financial Analysts
Conduct quantitative analyses of information affecting investment programs of public or private institutions.
Personal Financial Advisors
Advise clients on financial plans using knowledge of tax and investment strategies, securities, insurance, pension plans, and real estate. Duties include assessing clients' assets, liabilities, cash flow, insurance coverage, tax status, and financial objectives.
Loan Officers
Evaluate, authorize, or recommend approval of commercial, real estate, or credit loans. Advise borrowers on financial status and payment methods. Includes mortgage loan officers and agents, collection analysts, loan servicing officers, and loan underwriters.
Financial Specialists, All Other
All financial specialists not listed separately.
Business Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in business administration and management, such as accounting, finance, human resources, labor and industrial relations, marketing, and operations research. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.

Associates

A program that prepares individuals to perform a wide variety of customer services in banks, insurance agencies, savings and loan companies, and related enterprises. Includes instruction in communications and public relations skills, business equipment operation, and technical skills applicable to the methods and operations of specific financial or insurance services.

Job Opportunities:

Credit Counselors
Advise and educate individuals or organizations on acquiring and managing debt. May provide guidance in determining the best type of loan and explaining loan requirements or restrictions. May help develop debt management plans, advise on credit issues, or provide budget, mortgage, and bankruptcy counseling.
Bill and Account Collectors
Locate and notify customers of delinquent accounts by mail, telephone, or personal visit to solicit payment. Duties include receiving payment and posting amount to customer's account; preparing statements to credit department if customer fails to respond; initiating repossession proceedings or service disconnection; and keeping records of collection and status of accounts.
Tellers
Receive and pay out money. Keep records of money and negotiable instruments involved in a financial institution's various transactions.
Credit Authorizers, Checkers, and Clerks
Authorize credit charges against customers' accounts. Investigate history and credit standing of individuals or business establishments applying for credit. May interview applicants to obtain personal and financial data; determine credit worthiness; process applications; and notify customers of acceptance or rejection of credit.
Loan Interviewers and Clerks
Interview loan applicants to elicit information; investigate applicants' backgrounds and verify references; prepare loan request papers; and forward findings, reports, and documents to appraisal department. Review loan papers to ensure completeness, and complete transactions between loan establishment, borrowers, and sellers upon approval of loan.
New Accounts Clerks
Interview persons desiring to open accounts in financial institutions. Explain account services available to prospective customers and assist them in preparing applications.

A program that generally prepares individuals to plan, organize, direct, and control the functions and processes of a firm or organization. Includes instruction in management theory, human resources management and behavior, accounting and other quantitative methods, purchasing and logistics, organization and production, marketing, and business decision-making.

Job Opportunities:

Chief Executives
Determine and formulate policies and provide overall direction of companies or private and public sector organizations within guidelines set up by a board of directors or similar governing body. Plan, direct, or coordinate operational activities at the highest level of management with the help of subordinate executives and staff managers.
General and Operations Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate the operations of public or private sector organizations. Duties and responsibilities include formulating policies, managing daily operations, and planning the use of materials and human resources, but are too diverse and general in nature to be classified in any one functional area of management or administration, such as personnel, purchasing, or administrative services.
Sales Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate the actual distribution or movement of a product or service to the customer. Coordinate sales distribution by establishing sales territories, quotas, and goals and establish training programs for sales representatives. Analyze sales statistics gathered by staff to determine sales potential and inventory requirements and monitor the preferences of customers.
Administrative Services Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate one or more administrative services of an organization, such as records and information management, mail distribution, facilities planning and maintenance, custodial operations, and other office support services.
Industrial Production Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate the work activities and resources necessary for manufacturing products in accordance with cost, quality, and quantity specifications.
Transportation, Storage, and Distribution Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate transportation, storage, or distribution activities in accordance with organizational policies and applicable government laws or regulations. Includes logistics managers.
Construction Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate, usually through subordinate supervisory personnel, activities concerned with the construction and maintenance of structures, facilities, and systems. Participate in the conceptual development of a construction project and oversee its organization, scheduling, budgeting, and implementation. Includes managers in specialized construction fields, such as carpentry or plumbing.
Social and Community Service Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate the activities of a social service program or community outreach organization. Oversee the program or organization's budget and policies regarding participant involvement, program requirements, and benefits. Work may involve directing social workers, counselors, or probation officers.
Managers, All Other
All managers not listed separately.
Cost Estimators
Prepare cost estimates for product manufacturing, construction projects, or services to aid management in bidding on or determining price of product or service. May specialize according to particular service performed or type of product manufactured.
Management Analysts
Conduct organizational studies and evaluations, design systems and procedures, conduct work simplification and measurement studies, and prepare operations and procedures manuals to assist management in operating more efficiently and effectively. Includes program analysts and management consultants.
Business Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in business administration and management, such as accounting, finance, human resources, labor and industrial relations, marketing, and operations research. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.

Bachelor's

A program that focuses on the theory, organization, and process of information collection, transmission, and utilization in traditional and electronic forms. Includes instruction in information classification and organization; information storage and processing; transmission, transfer, and signaling; communications and networking; systems planning and design; human interfacing and use analysis; database development; information policy analysis; and related aspects of hardware, software, economics, social factors, and capacity.

Job Opportunities:

Computer and Information Systems Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate activities in such fields as electronic data processing, information systems, systems analysis, and computer programming.
Computer and Information Research Scientists
Conduct research into fundamental computer and information science as theorists, designers, or inventors. Develop solutions to problems in the field of computer hardware and software.
Software Developers, Systems Software
Research, design, develop, and test operating systems-level software, compilers, and network distribution software for medical, industrial, military, communications, aerospace, business, scientific, and general computing applications. Set operational specifications and formulate and analyze software requirements. May design embedded systems software. Apply principles and techniques of computer science, engineering, and mathematical analysis.
Computer Occupations, All Other
All computer occupations not listed separately.
Computer Science Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in computer science. May specialize in a field of computer science, such as the design and function of computers or operations and research analysis. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.

Associates

A program that focuses on the general writing and implementation of generic and customized programs to drive operating systems and that generally prepares individuals to apply the methods and procedures of software design and programming to software installation and maintenance. Includes instruction in software design, low- and high-level languages and program writing; program customization and linking; prototype testing; troubleshooting; and related aspects of operating systems and networks.

Job Opportunities:

Computer Programmers
Create, modify, and test the code, forms, and script that allow computer applications to run. Work from specifications drawn up by software developers or other individuals. May assist software developers by analyzing user needs and designing software solutions. May develop and write computer programs to store, locate, and retrieve specific documents, data, and information.
Software Developers, Applications
Develop, create, and modify general computer applications software or specialized utility programs. Analyze user needs and develop software solutions. Design software or customize software for client use with the aim of optimizing operational efficiency. May analyze and design databases within an application area, working individually or coordinating database development as part of a team. May supervise computer programmers.
Software Developers, Systems Software
Research, design, develop, and test operating systems-level software, compilers, and network distribution software for medical, industrial, military, communications, aerospace, business, scientific, and general computing applications. Set operational specifications and formulate and analyze software requirements. May design embedded systems software. Apply principles and techniques of computer science, engineering, and mathematical analysis.
Web Developers
Design, create, and modify Web sites. Analyze user needs to implement Web site content, graphics, performance, and capacity. May integrate Web sites with other computer applications. May convert written, graphic, audio, and video components to compatible Web formats by using software designed to facilitate the creation of Web and multimedia content.
Computer Network Support Specialists
Analyze, test, troubleshoot, and evaluate existing network systems, such as local area network (LAN), wide area network (WAN), and Internet systems or a segment of a network system. Perform network maintenance to ensure networks operate correctly with minimal interruption.
Computer Science Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in computer science. May specialize in a field of computer science, such as the design and function of computers or operations and research analysis. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.

Administration & Faculty

President Martin Oliner
Accredited by New York State Board of Regents, and the Commissioner of Education
Full-time Faculty 11
Student : Faculty Ratio 12 : 1
Faculty Gender (% Male : Female) 63 : 36
Percentage of Faculty Members
Non-Tenure Track Faculty 100

Admissions

Admissions

Selectivity

Admissions Websites

Finance

Finance

Average Net Tuition

The average student pays $18,107 for tuition, fees, and other expenses, after grants and scholarships.

Household Income Real Cost
$0-$30K $17,526
$30K-$48K $17,510
$48K-$75K $20,404
$75K-$110K $23,509
$110K+ $22,745

Sticker Price

Total stated tuition is $10,950, in-state and on-campus, before financial aid.

On-Campus Off-Campus
Stated Tuition $10,950 Same as On-Campus
Fees $170 Same as On-Campus
Housing N/A $18,174
Books $1,000 $1,000
Total (before financial aid) $12,120 $30,294

Students Receiving Aid

60% of students receive some form of financial aid.

Undergrads Receiving Aid Average Aid Amount
Federal Loans 26% $3,757
Federal Scholarships/Grants 55% $4,287
Institutional Grants 59% $1,857
Other Federal Grants 19% $167
Pell Grants 55% $4,231
State and Local Scholarships/Grants 33% $3,238
Student Loans 26% $3,757

Financial Aid Websites

Learn more about financial aid at http://www.globe.edu/financial_aid.asp.

Estimate the net price for you at http://www.globe.edu/net_price_calculator.asp.

Alumni and Outcomes

Alumni and Outcomes

Graduation Rates

1% of students graduated on time.

10% of students graduated in six years.

60% of full time students continued studying at this school after freshman year.

Rankings

WalletHub

#175 The Best and Worst College Cities and Towns in America

Washington Monthly

#6 National Universities - Faculty National Academies Rank
#11 National Universities - Overall Rank
#19 National Universities - Research Expenditures Rank
#20 National Universities - ROTC Rank
#43 National Universities - Faculty Awards Rank
#85 National Universities - Overall Score
#107 National Universities - Peace Corps Rank
#139 National Universities - Federal Work-Study Funds Spent on Service Rank
#155 National Universities - Community Service Participation Rank
#155 National Universities - Service Staff, Courses, and Financial Aid Rank
#219 National Universities - Graduation Rate Rank
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