Main Profile

At A Glance

University of Baltimore

The University of Baltimore is an upper-level institution that offers career-oriented and professional programs. The commuter campus enrolls about 4600 largely non-traditional students and is located in the mid-town section of Baltimore. Cultural opportunities include the Symphony and several art museums.

46
Selectivity
80
Influence
Heavy Focus on Undergraduate Professions, Master's University

Contact

University of Baltimore's Full Profile

Also Consider

Also Consider

Overview

Overview

Noodle Says

The University of Baltimore is an upper-level institution that offers career-oriented and professional programs. The commuter campus enrolls about 4600 largely non-traditional students and is located in the mid-town section of Baltimore. Cultural opportunities include the Symphony and several art museums.

People are saying

University of Baltimore says

The University of Baltimore was founded in 1925 as a private institution. Its founders were a group of Baltimore civic leaders who wanted to provide low-cost, part-time evening study in business and law for working adults. Its first site was at the southeast corner of St. Paul and Mt. Vernon Place with a class of 62 law students and 114 business students. UB became a state institution in 1975 and then part of the University of Maryland System (now known as the University System of Maryland) in 1988. The current campus includes numerous buildings (the former Baltimore Athletic Club is now Charles Hall, and the former home of Kelly Buick is now the Academic Center) in the Mt. Royal area. The newest facilities house the Yale Gordon College of Arts and Sciences and the Student Center. We continue to educate business and law students, but we've added many full-time day programs and an array of professionally oriented programs in the arts and sciences and public affairs.

Student Life

Student Life

People are saying

Student Body

Total Undergraduates 3,526
Gender 43% Male / 57% Female
Enrollment Breakdown 59% Full Time / 41% Part Time
Geography 98% In State / 2% Out of State / 1% International
Socio-Economic Diversity 56% of students received Pell Grants, which are provided by the U.S. government to students from middle and lower income families. It gives you an idea of a school’s socio-economic diversity.
Ethnic Diversity
Percentage
White 36%
Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander 0%
Multi-racial 3%
International 2%
Hispanic/Latino 4%
Ethnicity Unknown 5%
Black or African American 45%
Asian 4%
American Indian or Alaska Native 0%

Activities

Student Publications: UB POST

  • Government or Political Activity
  • International Student Organization
  • Literary Magazine
  • Student Newspaper
  • Sororities

Student Services

  • Academic Support Services: learning center reduced course load remedial instruction study skills assistance tutoring writing center pre-admission summer program
  • Computer Services: computer center, libraries, student center wireless network available
  • Counseling Services: career counseling employment services for undergraduates health services personal counseling placement services for graduates veteran's counselor financial aid counseling
  • Facilities: entrepreneurial opportunity center, graphics laboratory, business center, interactive video network
  • Special Needs Services: services and/or facilities for hearing impaired partial services for students with learning disabilities services and/or facilities for speech or communications disorders services and/or facilities for visually impaired wheelchair accessibility
  • Specialty Programs (ROTC, Accelerated Programs, Professional Development, etc.): accelerated program cooperative education cross-registration visiting/exchange student program honors program independent study internships student-designed major dual enrollment of high school students
  • Transfer In Services
  • Transfer Out Services

Academics

Academics

Popular Majors

Business/Commerce (35%), Criminal Justice/Police Science (8%), Health Services Administration (8%), Animation, Interactive Technology, Video Graphics and Special Effects (6%), Human Services (5%), Multi-/Interdisciplinary Studies, Other (4%)

Majors Offered

Bachelor's

A general program that focuses on the English language, including its history, structure and related communications skills; and the literature and culture of English-speaking peoples.

Job Opportunities:

English Language and Literature Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in English language and literature, including linguistics and comparative literature. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.
Secondary School Teachers, Except Special and Career/Technical Education
Teach students in one or more subjects, such as English, mathematics, or social studies at the secondary level in public or private schools. May be designated according to subject matter specialty.

A program that focuses on the general study and interpretation of the past, including the gathering, recording, synthesizing and criticizing of evidence and theories about past events. Includes instruction in historiography; historical research methods; studies of specific periods, issues and cultures; and applications to areas such as historic preservation, public policy, and records administration.

Job Opportunities:

Managers, All Other
All managers not listed separately.
Historians
Research, analyze, record, and interpret the past as recorded in sources, such as government and institutional records, newspapers and other periodicals, photographs, interviews, films, electronic media, and unpublished manuscripts, such as personal diaries and letters.
History Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in human history and historiography. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.
Secondary School Teachers, Except Special and Career/Technical Education
Teach students in one or more subjects, such as English, mathematics, or social studies at the secondary level in public or private schools. May be designated according to subject matter specialty.

Any instructional program in visual and performing arts not listed above.

Job Opportunities:

Art, Drama, and Music Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in drama, music, and the arts including fine and applied art, such as painting and sculpture, or design and crafts. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.

Bachelor's

A program that focuses on the general study of business, including the processes of interchanging goods and services (buying, selling and producing), business organization, and accounting as used in profit-making and nonprofit public and private institutions and agencies. The programs may prepare individuals to apply business principles and techniques in various occupational settings.

Job Opportunities:

Chief Executives
Determine and formulate policies and provide overall direction of companies or private and public sector organizations within guidelines set up by a board of directors or similar governing body. Plan, direct, or coordinate operational activities at the highest level of management with the help of subordinate executives and staff managers.
General and Operations Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate the operations of public or private sector organizations. Duties and responsibilities include formulating policies, managing daily operations, and planning the use of materials and human resources, but are too diverse and general in nature to be classified in any one functional area of management or administration, such as personnel, purchasing, or administrative services.
Sales Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate the actual distribution or movement of a product or service to the customer. Coordinate sales distribution by establishing sales territories, quotas, and goals and establish training programs for sales representatives. Analyze sales statistics gathered by staff to determine sales potential and inventory requirements and monitor the preferences of customers.
Administrative Services Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate one or more administrative services of an organization, such as records and information management, mail distribution, facilities planning and maintenance, custodial operations, and other office support services.
Industrial Production Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate the work activities and resources necessary for manufacturing products in accordance with cost, quality, and quantity specifications.
Transportation, Storage, and Distribution Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate transportation, storage, or distribution activities in accordance with organizational policies and applicable government laws or regulations. Includes logistics managers.
Construction Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate, usually through subordinate supervisory personnel, activities concerned with the construction and maintenance of structures, facilities, and systems. Participate in the conceptual development of a construction project and oversee its organization, scheduling, budgeting, and implementation. Includes managers in specialized construction fields, such as carpentry or plumbing.
Social and Community Service Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate the activities of a social service program or community outreach organization. Oversee the program or organization's budget and policies regarding participant involvement, program requirements, and benefits. Work may involve directing social workers, counselors, or probation officers.
Managers, All Other
All managers not listed separately.
Cost Estimators
Prepare cost estimates for product manufacturing, construction projects, or services to aid management in bidding on or determining price of product or service. May specialize according to particular service performed or type of product manufactured.
Management Analysts
Conduct organizational studies and evaluations, design systems and procedures, conduct work simplification and measurement studies, and prepare operations and procedures manuals to assist management in operating more efficiently and effectively. Includes program analysts and management consultants.
Business Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in business administration and management, such as accounting, finance, human resources, labor and industrial relations, marketing, and operations research. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.

A program that generally prepares individuals to provide and manage data systems and related facilities for processing and retrieving internal business information; select systems and train personnel; and respond to external data requests. Includes instruction in cost and accounting information systems, management control systems, personnel information systems, data storage and security, business systems networking, report preparation, computer facilities and equipment operation and maintenance, operator supervision and training, and management information systems policy and planning.

Job Opportunities:

Computer and Information Systems Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate activities in such fields as electronic data processing, information systems, systems analysis, and computer programming.
Computer Programmers
Create, modify, and test the code, forms, and script that allow computer applications to run. Work from specifications drawn up by software developers or other individuals. May assist software developers by analyzing user needs and designing software solutions. May develop and write computer programs to store, locate, and retrieve specific documents, data, and information.

A program that prepares individuals to develop, buy, sell, appraise, and manage real estate. Includes instruction in land use development policy, real estate law, real estate marketing procedures, agency management, brokerage, property inspection and appraisal, real estate investing, leased and rental properties, commercial real estate, and property management.

Job Opportunities:

Property, Real Estate, and Community Association Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate the selling, buying, leasing, or governance activities of commercial, industrial, or residential real estate properties. Includes managers of homeowner and condominium associations, rented or leased housing units, buildings, or land (including rights-of-way).
Appraisers and Assessors of Real Estate
Appraise real property and estimate its fair value. May assess taxes in accordance with prescribed schedules.
Real Estate Brokers
Operate real estate office, or work for commercial real estate firm, overseeing real estate transactions. Other duties usually include selling real estate or renting properties and arranging loans.
Real Estate Sales Agents
Rent, buy, or sell property for clients. Perform duties, such as study property listings, interview prospective clients, accompany clients to property site, discuss conditions of sale, and draw up real estate contracts. Includes agents who represent buyer.

Bachelor's

A program that focuses on the application of policy analysis, public administration, business management, and communications to the planning and management of health services delivery systems in the public and private sectors, and prepares individuals to function as health services administrators and managers. Includes instruction in health systems planning, public health organization and management, pubic health policy formulation and analysis, finance, business and operations management, economics of health care, organizational and health communications, marketing, human resources management, and public health law and regulations.

Job Opportunities:

Medical and Health Services Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate medical and health services in hospitals, clinics, managed care organizations, public health agencies, or similar organizations.

A program that focuses on the application of chemistry to the study of biologically and clinically active substances, biological and pharmacological interactions, and the development of associated research methods, techniques, and clinical trial procedures. Includes instruction in organic chemistry, biochemistry, molecular graphics, rational drug design, toxicology, molecular biology, pharmacology, enzyme mechanisms, receptor theory, neurochemistry, drug metabolism, drug synthesis, biological mechanisms of drug action, research tools and techniques, and laboratory safety.

Job Opportunities:

Pharmacists
Dispense drugs prescribed by physicians and other health practitioners and provide information to patients about medications and their use. May advise physicians and other health practitioners on the selection, dosage, interactions, and side effects of medications.

Bachelor's

Any instructional program in multi/interdisciplinary studies not listed above.

Bachelor's

An advanced, professional program of the U.S. legal system, Constitution law, and jurisprudence. Includes instruction in legal history, legal sociology, philosophy of law, Constitutional law, legal procedure, and related topics.

Job Opportunities:

Lawyers
Represent clients in criminal and civil litigation and other legal proceedings, draw up legal documents, or manage or advise clients on legal transactions. May specialize in a single area or may practice broadly in many areas of law.

A program that focuses on the theories, principles, and practice of providing services to communities, organizing communities and neighborhoods for social action, serving as community liaisons to public agencies, and using community resources to furnish information, instruction, and assistance to all members of a community. May prepare individuals to apply such knowledge and skills in community service positions.

Job Opportunities:

Social and Community Service Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate the activities of a social service program or community outreach organization. Oversee the program or organization's budget and policies regarding participant involvement, program requirements, and benefits. Work may involve directing social workers, counselors, or probation officers.
Community and Social Service Specialists, All Other
All community and social service specialists not listed separately.
Eligibility Interviewers, Government Programs
Determine eligibility of persons applying to receive assistance from government programs and agency resources, such as welfare, unemployment benefits, social security, and public housing.

A program that prepares individuals to perform the duties of police and public security officers, including patrol and investigative activities, traffic control, crowd control and public relations, witness interviewing, evidence collection and management, basic crime prevention methods, weapon and equipment operation and maintenance, report preparation and other routine law enforcement responsibilities.

Job Opportunities:

Criminal Justice and Law Enforcement Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in criminal justice, corrections, and law enforcement administration. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.
Bailiffs
Maintain order in courts of law.
Detectives and Criminal Investigators
Conduct investigations related to suspected violations of Federal, State, or local laws to prevent or solve crimes.
Police and Sheriff's Patrol Officers
Maintain order and protect life and property by enforcing local, tribal, State, or Federal laws and ordinances. Perform a combination of the following duties: patrol a specific area; direct traffic; issue traffic summonses; investigate accidents; apprehend and arrest suspects, or serve legal processes of courts.
Private Detectives and Investigators
Gather, analyze, compile and report information regarding individuals or organizations to clients, or detect occurrences of unlawful acts or infractions of rules in private establishment.

A program that focuses on the application of the physical, biomedical, and social sciences to the analysis and evaluation of physical evidence, human testimony and criminal suspects. Includes instruction in forensic medicine, forensic dentistry, anthropology, psychology, entomology, pathology, forensic laboratory technology and autopsy procedures, DNA and blood pattern analysis, crime scene analysis, crime scene photography, fingerprint technology, document analysis, witness and suspect examination procedures, applicable law and regulations, and professional standards and ethics.

Job Opportunities:

Forensic Science Technicians
Collect, identify, classify, and analyze physical evidence related to criminal investigations. Perform tests on weapons or substances, such as fiber, hair, and tissue to determine significance to investigation. May testify as expert witnesses on evidence or crime laboratory techniques. May serve as specialists in area of expertise, such as ballistics, fingerprinting, handwriting, or biochemistry.
Criminal Justice and Law Enforcement Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in criminal justice, corrections, and law enforcement administration. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.

A program that focuses on the general study and provision of human and social services to individuals and communities and prepares individuals to work in public and private human services agencies and organizations. Includes instruction in the social sciences, psychology, principles of social service, human services policy, planning and evaluation, social services law and administration, and applications to particular issues, services, localities, and populations.

Job Opportunities:

Social and Community Service Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate the activities of a social service program or community outreach organization. Oversee the program or organization's budget and policies regarding participant involvement, program requirements, and benefits. Work may involve directing social workers, counselors, or probation officers.
Social and Human Service Assistants
Assist in providing client services in a wide variety of fields, such as psychology, rehabilitation, or social work, including support for families. May assist clients in identifying and obtaining available benefits and social and community services. May assist social workers with developing, organizing, and conducting programs to prevent and resolve problems relevant to substance abuse, human relationships, rehabilitation, or dependent care.
Community and Social Service Specialists, All Other
All community and social service specialists not listed separately.

Bachelor's

A program that focuses on environment-related issues using scientific, social scientific, or humanistic approaches or a combination. Includes instruction in the basic principles of ecology and environmental science and related subjects such as policy, politics, law, economics, social aspects, planning, pollution control, natural resources, and the interactions of human beings and nature.

Job Opportunities:

Environmental Scientists and Specialists, Including Health
Conduct research or perform investigation for the purpose of identifying, abating, or eliminating sources of pollutants or hazards that affect either the environment or the health of the population. Using knowledge of various scientific disciplines, may collect, synthesize, study, report, and recommend action based on data derived from measurements or observations of air, food, soil, water, and other sources.
Environmental Science Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in environmental science. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.

A program that focuses on the theory, organization, and process of information collection, transmission, and utilization in traditional and electronic forms. Includes instruction in information classification and organization; information storage and processing; transmission, transfer, and signaling; communications and networking; systems planning and design; human interfacing and use analysis; database development; information policy analysis; and related aspects of hardware, software, economics, social factors, and capacity.

Job Opportunities:

Computer and Information Systems Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate activities in such fields as electronic data processing, information systems, systems analysis, and computer programming.
Computer and Information Research Scientists
Conduct research into fundamental computer and information science as theorists, designers, or inventors. Develop solutions to problems in the field of computer hardware and software.
Software Developers, Systems Software
Research, design, develop, and test operating systems-level software, compilers, and network distribution software for medical, industrial, military, communications, aerospace, business, scientific, and general computing applications. Set operational specifications and formulate and analyze software requirements. May design embedded systems software. Apply principles and techniques of computer science, engineering, and mathematical analysis.
Computer Occupations, All Other
All computer occupations not listed separately.
Computer Science Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in computer science. May specialize in a field of computer science, such as the design and function of computers or operations and research analysis. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.

Bachelor's

A program that prepares individuals to use computer applications and related visual and sound imaging techniques to manipulate images and information originating as film, video, still photographs, digital copy, soundtracks, and physical objects in order to communicate messages simulating real-world content. Includes instruction in specialized camerawork and equipment operation and maintenance, image capture, computer programming, dubbing, CAD applications, and applications to specific commercial, industrial, and entertainment needs.

Job Opportunities:

Multimedia Artists and Animators
Create special effects, animation, or other visual images using film, video, computers, or other electronic tools and media for use in products or creations, such as computer games, movies, music videos, and commercials.

Bachelor's

A program that focuses on the systematic study of United States political institutions and behavior. Includes instruction in American political theory, political parties and interest groups, state and local governments, Constitutional law, federalism and national institutions, executive and legislative politics, judicial politics, popular attitudes and media influences, political research methods, and applications to the study of specific issues and institutions.

Job Opportunities:

Managers, All Other
All managers not listed separately.
Political Scientists
Study the origin, development, and operation of political systems. May study topics, such as public opinion, political decision-making, and ideology. May analyze the structure and operation of governments, as well as various political entities. May conduct public opinion surveys, analyze election results, or analyze public documents.
Political Science Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in political science, international affairs, and international relations. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.

A program that focuses on the development, use, critical evaluation, and regulation of new electronic communication technologies using computer applications; and that prepares individuals to function as developers and managers of digital communications media. Includes instruction in computer and telecommunications technologies and processes; design and development of digital communications; marketing and distribution; digital communications regulation, law, and policy; the study of human interaction with, and use of, digital media; and emerging trends and issues.

Job Opportunities:

Managers, All Other
All managers not listed separately.
Communications Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in communications, such as organizational communications, public relations, radio/television broadcasting, and journalism. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.
Media and Communication Workers, All Other
All media and communication workers not listed separately.

A program that focuses on the systematic study of international politics and institutions, and the conduct of diplomacy and foreign policy. Includes instruction in international relations theory, foreign policy analysis, international law and organization, the comparative study of specific countries and regions, and the theory and practice of diplomacy.

Job Opportunities:

Managers, All Other
All managers not listed separately.
Political Scientists
Study the origin, development, and operation of political systems. May study topics, such as public opinion, political decision-making, and ideology. May analyze the structure and operation of governments, as well as various political entities. May conduct public opinion surveys, analyze election results, or analyze public documents.
Political Science Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in political science, international affairs, and international relations. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.

A general program that focuses on the scientific study of individual and collective behavior, the physical and environmental bases of behavior, and the analysis and treatment of behavior problems and disorders. Includes instruction in the principles of the various subfields of psychology, research methods, and psychological assessment and testing methods.

Job Opportunities:

Managers, All Other
All managers not listed separately.
Clinical, Counseling, and School Psychologists
Diagnose and treat mental disorders; learning disabilities; and cognitive, behavioral, and emotional problems, using individual, child, family, and group therapies. May design and implement behavior modification programs.
Industrial-Organizational Psychologists
Apply principles of psychology to human resources, administration, management, sales, and marketing problems. Activities may include policy planning; employee testing and selection, training and development; and organizational development and analysis. May work with management to organize the work setting to improve worker productivity.
Psychologists, All Other
All psychologists not listed separately.
Psychology Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in psychology, such as child, clinical, and developmental psychology, and psychological counseling. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.

Any instructional program in organizational communication, public relations, and advertising not listed above.

Administration & Faculty

President Robert L. Bogomolny
Accredited by Middle States Commission on Higher Education
Full-time Faculty 197
Student : Faculty Ratio 16 : 1
Faculty Gender (% Male : Female) 56 : 43
Percentage of Faculty Members
Tenured Faculty 52
Tenure Track Faculty 31
Non-Tenure Track Faculty 15
International Faculty 3

AP Test Credit Information

Test Name Minimum Score Equivalent Course (s) Credits
AP Art History 3.0 HUMANITIES (FINE ARTS) 3.0
AP Biology 3.0 Lab Science 4.0
AP Biology 4.0 Lab Science 4.0
AP Calculus AB 3.0 MATH 3.0
AP Calculus BC 3.0 MATH 3.0
AP Chemistry 3.0 Lab Science 4.0
AP Chemistry 4.0 N/A 4.0
AP Chemistry 5.0 N/A 8.0
AP Chinese Language and Culture 3.0 General Elective 3.0
AP Comparative Government and Politics 3.0 SOC & BEH SCI (GVPP) 3.0
AP Computer Science A 3.0 General Elective 3.0
AP English Language and Composition 3.0 General Elective 3.0
AP English Literature and Composition 3.0 Arts and Humanities General Education 4.0
AP Environmental Science 3.0 Lab Science 4.0
AP European History 3.0 HUMANITIES (HISTORY) 3.0
AP French Language and Culture 3.0 Lower level elective 3.0
AP German Language and Culture 3.0 Lower level elective 3.0
AP Human Geography 3.0 SOC & BEH SCI (GEOG) 3.0
AP Latin 3.0 N/A 3.0
AP Macroeconomics 3.0 SOC & BEH SCI 3.0
AP Microeconomics 3.0 SOC & BEH SCI 3.0
AP Music Theory 3.0 General Elective 3.0
AP Physics B 3.0 Lab Science 4.0
AP Physics B 4.0 N/A 4.0
AP Physics B 5.0 N/A 8.0
AP Psychology 3.0 SOC & BEH SCI 3.0
AP Spanish Language and Culture 3.0 General Elective 3.0
AP Statistics 3.0 MATH 3.0
AP United States Government and Politics 3.0 SOC & BEH SCI (GVPP) 3.0
AP United States History 3.0 HUMANITIES (HISTORY) 3.0
AP World History 3.0 HUMANITIES (HISTORY) 3.0

Admissions

Admissions

Selectivity

Selectivity Score: 46/100
46
Selectivity

Acceptance Rate: 72.9% accepted of 695 applications

25th - 75th Percentile
 
SATMath410 - 510
Reading430 - 530
Writing400 - 510

Admission Considerations

Very Important: Application Essay, Rigor Of Secondary School Record, Standardized Test Scores, Academic GPA

Also Considered: Work Experience, Level Of Applicants Interest, Recommendations, Talent Ability, Volunteer Work, Alumni Relation, Character Personal Qualities, Extracurricular Activities, Interview

High School Curriculum (years of study):
Required Recommended
History 3 0
Foreign Language 1 2
Academic Electives 4 0
Computer Science 1 2
English 4 0
Math 3 0
Science 3 0
Social Studies 3 0

Other Application Information: SAT or ACT SAT Subject Tests

Admissions Websites

Finance

Finance

Average Net Tuition

The average student pays $17,231 for tuition, fees, and other expenses, after grants and scholarships.

Household Income Real Cost
$0-$30K $13,639
$30K-$48K $17,315
$48K-$75K $17,854
$75K-$110K $21,388
$110K+ $20,987

Sticker Price

Total stated tuition is $5,992, in-state and on-campus, before financial aid.

In-State

On-Campus Off-Campus
Stated Tuition $5,992 Same as On-Campus
Fees $1,846 Same as On-Campus
Housing N/A $14,200
Books $1,400 $1,400
Total (before financial aid) $9,238 $23,438

Out-of-State

On-Campus Off-Campus
Stated Tuition $15,660 Same as On-Campus
Fees $1,846 Same as On-Campus
Housing N/A $14,200
Books $1,400 $1,400
Total (before financial aid) $18,906 $33,106

Students Receiving Aid

93% of students receive some form of financial aid.

Undergrads Receiving Aid Average Aid Amount
Federal Loans 55% $5,571
Federal Scholarships/Grants 57% $5,163
Institutional Grants 73% $4,306
Other Federal Grants 12% $1,803
Other Loans 2% $9,837
Pell Grants 57% $4,779
State and Local Scholarships/Grants 41% $3,361
Student Loans 55% $5,855

Financial Aid Websites

Learn more about financial aid at http://www.ubalt.edu/template.cfm?page=68.

Estimate the net price for you at http://www.collegeportraits.org/md/ub/estimator/agree.

Alumni and Outcomes

Alumni and Outcomes

Graduation Rates

23% of students graduated on time.

37% of students graduated in six years.

67% of full time students continued studying at this school after freshman year.

Salaries

The typical (median) early career salary of University of Baltimore graduates is $48,800, according to Payscale.

Rankings

PayScale

#556 Starting Median Salary Rankings

U.S. News & World Report

#36 Regional Universities North Top Public Rankings
#44 Regional Universities Overall Score
#87 Regional Universities
#115 Regional Universities North Rankings

WalletHub

#192 The Best and Worst College Cities and Towns in America

Washington Monthly

#45 Master's Universities - Overall Score
#77 Master's Universities - Research Expenditures Rank
#102 Master's Universities - Service Staff, Courses, and Financial Aid Rank
#114 Master's Universities - Community Service Participation Rank
#190 Master's Universities - Federal Work-Study Funds Spent on Service Rank
#230 Master's Universities - Peace Corps Rank
#301 Master's Universities - Overall Rank
#377 Master's Universities - Graduation Rate Rank
#432 Master's Universities - ROTC Rank
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