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Ozark Christian College

Ozark Christian College is Christian college with 751 students located in Joplin, MO.

Open Admissions, Religiously affiliated, Seminary / Bible College

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Ozark Christian College's Full Profile

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Overview

Overview

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Ozark Christian College says

Ozark Bible College was established in Bentonville, Arkansas, on June 12, 1942. The school was committed to training men and women for Christian service by teaching the Word of Christ in the Spirit of Christ. An earlier OZARK CHRISTIAN COLLEGE was established in St. Joe, Arkansas, in 1938. It moved to Harrison, Arkansas, in 1939, and then to Bentonville in 1940. This school was to provide both occupational training and Bible teaching. Ozark Bible College was founded to be a Bible college training full-time and part-time Christian workers. Workers were prepared to be ministers, missionaries, evangelistic singers, church secretaries, educational directors and assistant ministers, as well as elders, deacons and volunteer workers in the local church. The trustees elected F. W. Strong as president and Seth Wilson as dean, positions they held in the former college.

Many churches in the four state area of Missouri, Kansas, Arkansas, and Oklahoma were closed and hundreds were without preachers. Ozark Bible College desired to provide Biblical preachers whose preaching would revive the churches.

In October of 1944, Ozark Bible College moved to Joplin, Missouri. A large house located at 516 N. Wall Street became the new home for the college. Joplin was chosen as the new location for the college because it was easily reached by car, bus, train or plane. Many churches surrounded Joplin, which provided opportunities for student ministries. Joplin also had job opportunities for students. In 1946, Edwin B. Strong succeeded his father as president of Ozark Bible College. The college grew from sixteen students in 1942 to 123 students in the fall of 1949. An addition to the building in 1948 provided a dining room, a small chapel and two classrooms. At this time most of the full-time faculty preached every weekend. Area ministers assisted as part-time instructors. Students were involved in service in the churches on weekends.

The curriculum has always stressed a knowledge of the Bible, gained through a direct study of the Biblical text, with every degree carrying a major in Bible. Strong emphasis has been placed on apologetics (knowing why we believe in God, Christ and the Bible) and hermeneutics (principles and methods for understanding the Bible). Skills for ministry were also taught at this time.

In 1952, Don Earl Boatman became the third president of Ozark Bible College, a post he held for 27 years. The college had a vision and desire to grow. In 1953 additions to the college provided a large chapel, a library and additional classrooms. This enabled the college to accommodate the 176 students who enrolled in the fall of 1954. In 1955, seventy-five churches were served by Ozark faculty, staff and students. Soon the college reached the maximum capacity in the 516 N. Wall building.

In 1959, forty acres were purchased on North Main Street, a mile north of downtown Joplin and less than a mile from the Wall Street location. The Missions Building and Alumni Hall were completed in 1963 providing classrooms and a dormitory for women. This enabled the college to move to the new campus to welcome 309 students in the fall of 1963. The Administration Building was completed a few weeks after the fall semester started. Under the direction of Walter Goodman, thirteen buildings were constructed on the new campus during its first two decades.

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Student Life

Student Life

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Student Body

Total Undergraduates 751
Gender 57% Male / 43% Female
Enrollment Breakdown 87% Full Time / 13% Part Time
Geography 1% International
Socio-Economic Diversity 47% of students received Pell Grants, which are provided by the U.S. government to students from middle and lower income families. It gives you an idea of a school’s socio-economic diversity.
Ethnic Diversity
Percentage
White 89%
Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander 0%
Multi-racial 3%
International 2%
Hispanic/Latino 2%
Black or African American 2%
Asian 0%
American Indian or Alaska Native 1%

Housing

Campus housing is available for undergraduates. Housing deposit : $90.00. Housing deposit due : Aug 5. Freshman allowed to have car. No pets.

90% of freshman live on-campus.

  • Housing Offered
  • Men's Dorms
  • Wellness Housing
  • Women's Dorms

Activities

  • Government or Political Activity
  • Yearbook
  • Choral Groups
  • Musical Theater
  • Music Ensembles
  • Drama/Theater

Student Services

  • Academic Support Services: learning center study skills assistance tutoring writing center
  • Computer Services: libraries, student center dorms wired for access to campus-wide network dorms wired for high speed internet connections computer repair service available on campus wireless network available
  • Counseling Services: career counseling employment services for undergraduates financial aid counseling health services personal counseling placement services for graduates adult (re-entering) student services/programs veteran's counselor chaplain/spiritual director
  • Facilities
  • Special Needs Services: services and/or facilities for hearing impaired partial services for students with learning disabilities wheelchair accessibility
  • Specialty Programs (ROTC, Accelerated Programs, Professional Development, etc.): double major internships independent study cooperative education
  • Transfer In Services
  • Transfer Out Services

Academics

Academics

Popular Majors

Bible/Biblical Studies (55%), Bible/Biblical Studies (32%), Theology/Theological Studies (8%), Religious/Sacred Music (2%), Religious/Sacred Music (1%), Linguistics of ASL and Other Sign Languages (0%)

Majors Offered

Bachelor's

A program that focuses on the Christian and/or Jewish Bible and related literature, with an emphasis on understanding and interpreting the theological, doctrinal, and ethical messages contained therein. May include preparation for applying these studies in various religious vocations.

Job Opportunities:

Directors, Religious Activities and Education
Plan, direct, or coordinate programs designed to promote the religious education or activities of a denominational group. May provide counseling and guidance relative to marital, health, financial, and religious problems.
Philosophy and Religion Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in philosophy, religion, and theology. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.

A program that focuses on the scientific and scholarly study of the development, structure, and use of American Sign Language (ASL) and other visual signed languages, both as vehicles for communication within the deaf community and in relation to spoken and written languages. Includes instruction in cognitive linguistics; ASL and sign language phonology, syntax, and morphology; sociolinguistics of the deaf community; comparative linguistics; and studies of specific sign languages, including, but not limited to, ASL, Auslan (Australian Sign Language), LSF (French Sign Language), Shuwa jiten (Japanese Sign Language), HamNoSys (German Sign Language), and Gestuno.

Job Opportunities:

Postsecondary Teachers, All Other
All postsecondary teachers not listed separately.
Interpreters and Translators
Interpret oral or sign language, or translate written text from one language into another.

A program that focuses on the theory and practice of religious outreach, social service and proselytization, and that prepares individuals for mission vocations. Includes instruction in theology, evangelism, preaching, medical and social mission work, missionary education, missionary aviation, emergency services, legal and political aspects of working in other countries, and preparation for ordination as missionaries.

Job Opportunities:

Directors, Religious Activities and Education
Plan, direct, or coordinate programs designed to promote the religious education or activities of a denominational group. May provide counseling and guidance relative to marital, health, financial, and religious problems.
Philosophy and Religion Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in philosophy, religion, and theology. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.

A program that focuses on the history, theory, composition, and performance of music for religious or sacred purposes, and that prepares individuals for religious musical vocations such as choir directors, cantors, organists, and chanters.

Job Opportunities:

Philosophy and Religion Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in philosophy, religion, and theology. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.
Music Directors and Composers
Conduct, direct, plan, and lead instrumental or vocal performances by musical groups, such as orchestras, bands, choirs, and glee clubs. Includes arrangers, composers, choral directors, and orchestrators.

A program that focuses on the beliefs and doctrine of a particular religious faith from the intramural point of view of that faith. Includes instruction in systematic theology, historical theology, moral theology, doctrinal studies, dogmatics, apologetics, and applications to specific questions of ecclesiastical polity and religious life.

Job Opportunities:

Clergy
Conduct religious worship and perform other spiritual functions associated with beliefs and practices of religious faith or denomination. Provide spiritual and moral guidance and assistance to members.
Philosophy and Religion Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in philosophy, religion, and theology. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.

Associates

A program that focuses on the Christian and/or Jewish Bible and related literature, with an emphasis on understanding and interpreting the theological, doctrinal, and ethical messages contained therein. May include preparation for applying these studies in various religious vocations.

Job Opportunities:

Directors, Religious Activities and Education
Plan, direct, or coordinate programs designed to promote the religious education or activities of a denominational group. May provide counseling and guidance relative to marital, health, financial, and religious problems.
Philosophy and Religion Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in philosophy, religion, and theology. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.

A program that focuses on the scientific and scholarly study of the development, structure, and use of American Sign Language (ASL) and other visual signed languages, both as vehicles for communication within the deaf community and in relation to spoken and written languages. Includes instruction in cognitive linguistics; ASL and sign language phonology, syntax, and morphology; sociolinguistics of the deaf community; comparative linguistics; and studies of specific sign languages, including, but not limited to, ASL, Auslan (Australian Sign Language), LSF (French Sign Language), Shuwa jiten (Japanese Sign Language), HamNoSys (German Sign Language), and Gestuno.

Job Opportunities:

Postsecondary Teachers, All Other
All postsecondary teachers not listed separately.
Interpreters and Translators
Interpret oral or sign language, or translate written text from one language into another.

A program that focuses on the theory and practice of religious outreach, social service and proselytization, and that prepares individuals for mission vocations. Includes instruction in theology, evangelism, preaching, medical and social mission work, missionary education, missionary aviation, emergency services, legal and political aspects of working in other countries, and preparation for ordination as missionaries.

Job Opportunities:

Directors, Religious Activities and Education
Plan, direct, or coordinate programs designed to promote the religious education or activities of a denominational group. May provide counseling and guidance relative to marital, health, financial, and religious problems.
Philosophy and Religion Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in philosophy, religion, and theology. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.

A program that focuses on the history, theory, composition, and performance of music for religious or sacred purposes, and that prepares individuals for religious musical vocations such as choir directors, cantors, organists, and chanters.

Job Opportunities:

Philosophy and Religion Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in philosophy, religion, and theology. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.
Music Directors and Composers
Conduct, direct, plan, and lead instrumental or vocal performances by musical groups, such as orchestras, bands, choirs, and glee clubs. Includes arrangers, composers, choral directors, and orchestrators.

Administration & Faculty

President Matthew Proctor
Accredited by Association for Biblical Higher Education, Commission on Accreditation
Full-time Faculty 30
Student : Faculty Ratio 19 : 1
Faculty Gender (% Male : Female) 86 : 13
Percentage of Faculty Members
Non-Tenure Track Faculty 100

AP Test Credit Information

Test Name Minimum Score Equivalent Course (s) Credits
AP Art History 3.0 N/A 3.0
AP Biology 3.0 N/A 4.0
AP Calculus AB 4.0 MA 125 5.0
AP Calculus BC 4.0 MA 125 5.0
AP Chemistry 3.0 N/A 5.0
AP Chinese Language and Culture 4.0 N/A 5.0
AP Comparative Government and Politics 3.0 N/A 3.0
AP Computer Science A 3.0 N/A 3.0
AP English Language and Composition 4.0 EL 118 or EL 210 3.0
AP English Literature and Composition 4.0 EL 316 and EL 118 6.0
AP Environmental Science 3.0 N/A 3.0
AP European History 4.0 N/A 3.0
AP French Language and Culture 4.0 N/A 5.0
AP German Language and Culture 4.0 N/A 5.0
AP Human Geography 4.0 HI 224 3.0
AP Italian Language and Culture 4.0 N/A 5.0
AP Latin 3.0 N/A 3.0
AP Macroeconomics 3.0 N/A 3.0
AP Microeconomics 3.0 N/A 3.0
AP Music Theory 4.0 MU 110 1.0
AP Physics B 3.0 N/A 5.0
AP Psychology 4.0 PC 216 3.0
AP Spanish Language and Culture 4.0 N/A 5.0
AP Statistics 4.0 MA 125 3.0
AP United States Government and Politics 3.0 N/A 3.0
AP United States History 4.0 HI 222 3.0
AP World History 4.0 HI 221 3.0

Admissions

Admissions

Selectivity

Deadlines

August

5

Regular Decision

Admissions Websites

Finance

Finance

Average Net Tuition

The average student pays $13,032 for tuition, fees, and other expenses, after grants and scholarships.

Household Income Real Cost
$0-$30K $10,835
$30K-$48K $10,583
$48K-$75K $12,988
$75K-$110K $15,365
$110K+ $15,396

Sticker Price

Total stated tuition is $10,400, in-state and on-campus, before financial aid.

On-Campus Off-Campus
Stated Tuition $10,400 Same as On-Campus
Fees $640 Same as On-Campus
Housing $4,460 $6,696
Books $800 $800
Total (before financial aid) $16,300 $18,536

Students Receiving Aid

100% of students receive some form of financial aid.

Undergrads Receiving Aid Average Aid Amount
Federal Loans 60% $4,769
Federal Scholarships/Grants 47% $3,865
Institutional Grants 99% $3,852
Other Federal Grants 6% $665
Other Loans 3% $7,339
Pell Grants 47% $3,786
Student Loans 61% $5,059

Financial Aid Websites

Learn more about financial aid at http://www.occ.edu/financialaid/occ.financial.aid.aspx.

Estimate the net price for you at http://www.occ.edu/admissions/npc.aspx.

Alumni and Outcomes

Alumni and Outcomes

Graduation Rates

10% of students graduated on time.

48% of students graduated in six years.

72% of full time students continued studying at this school after freshman year.

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