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Clarkson College

Clarkson College is Episcopal college with 780 students located in Omaha, NE.

Medicine and Allied Health School, Religiously affiliated

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Clarkson College's Full Profile

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Overview

Overview

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Clarkson College says

The institution known today as Clarkson College began as a dream of Bishop Robert H. Clarkson in the late 1800s. Bishop Clarkson wanted to see the establishment of a first-rate nursing school in Omaha, and the realization of his dream began in 1869 with the opening of Omaha's Good Samaritan Hospital.

After Bishop Clarkson's passing in 1884, his wife Meliora worked to complete his vision by establishing a training school for nurses, and the hospital became home to the Bishop Clarkson Memorial School of Nursing. The school graduated its first nursing class--a mere two graduates--in 1890.

As the school grew in enrollment, its offerings grew as well. Having started with only two-year programs, the Clarkson School of Nursing began offering three-year programs in 1902.

Enrollment continued to grow, and in 1917, when the first 10 Nebraska Red Cross Nurses were sent to France for service in World War I, half of them were Clarkson School of Nursing graduates.

In 1936, the school moved to new facilities at 26th and Dewey Streets, with students housed in several homes nearby. That move was followed during World War II by the building of a new dormitory built across the street from the hospital. During that time, the school activity participated in the U.S. Cadet Nurse Corps program. After the war, the school moved to its present location at 42nd and Dewey Streets.

Challenges loomed in the 1950s, as budget problems forced the nurses' program to close in 1955. It proved to be a bump in the road, as a generous donation from Mr. and Mrs. Peter Kiewit made it possible for the program to re-open in 1960.

Soon, Clarkson College Nursing graduates were once again helping America in its outreach to the world. In 1966, 11 graduates traveled to Vietnam as part of an 11-month tour.

Change and progress soon accelerated, as Clarkson College admitted its first male student in 1969, and male enrollment grew steadily throughout the 1970s.

During the 1980s, major accreditation came to Clarkson from leading bodies including the North Central Association and the National League for Nursing. This was followed in the 1990s by a major expansion of the programs offered at the College, including online education, Radiologic Technology, Physical Therapist Assistant and Health Care Business.

As a new millennium dawned, Clarkson College developed the Gateway to Success Minority Nursing Scholarship, facilitating greater opportunities for a more diverse student population--and creating the need for more upgrades to facilities.

In 2004, the College opened its new Student Village campus, with first-rate residence hall facilities and a courtyard right across from The Nebraska Medical Center and Clarkson College academic facilities.

Today, Clarkson College continues its longstanding tradition of preparing its students to be the best--starting them on the path to fulfilling and rewarding careers in the field of health care. We look forward to carrying on this tradition for many years to come.

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Student Life

Student Life

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Student Body

Total Undergraduates 780
Gender 13% Male / 87% Female
Enrollment Breakdown 58% Full Time / 42% Part Time
Geography 72% In State / 28% Out of State / % International
Socio-Economic Diversity 33% of students received Pell Grants, which are provided by the U.S. government to students from middle and lower income families. It gives you an idea of a school’s socio-economic diversity.
Ethnic Diversity
Percentage
White 78%
Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander 0%
Multi-racial 1%
Hispanic/Latino 3%
Ethnicity Unknown 8%
Black or African American 7%
Asian 2%
American Indian or Alaska Native 0%

Housing

5% of students live on-campus.

  • Apartments for Single Students
  • Coed Dorms

Activities

  • Government or Political Activity
  • Student Newspaper

Student Services

  • Academic Support Services: learning center reduced course load study skills assistance tutoring writing center
  • Computer Services: computer center, dorms, libraries dorms wired for high speed internet connections computer repair service available on campus
  • Counseling Services: alcohol/substance abuse counseling career counseling employment services for undergraduates financial aid counseling health services minority students services on-campus daycare personal counseling placement services for graduates adult (re-entering) student services/programs
  • Facilities: health care clinical facilities for professional education (more than 180 clinical sites), fully energized radiologic technology lab
  • Special Needs Services: services and/or facilities for hearing impaired partial services for students with learning disabilities services and/or facilities for visually impaired wheelchair accessibility
  • Specialty Programs (ROTC, Accelerated Programs, Professional Development, etc.): accelerated program cooperative education cross-registration double major dual enrollment of high school students external degree program independent study internships
  • Transfer In Services
  • Transfer Out Services

Academics

Academics

Popular Majors

Registered Nursing/Registered Nurse (57%), Physical Therapy Technician/Assistant (14%), Medical Radiologic Technology/Science - Radiation Therapist (12%), Medical Radiologic Technology/Science - Radiation Therapist (11%), Health Information/Medical Records Administration/Administrator (2%), Business/Commerce (1%)

Majors Offered

Bachelor's

A program that focuses on the general study of business, including the processes of interchanging goods and services (buying, selling and producing), business organization, and accounting as used in profit-making and nonprofit public and private institutions and agencies. The programs may prepare individuals to apply business principles and techniques in various occupational settings.

Job Opportunities:

Chief Executives
Determine and formulate policies and provide overall direction of companies or private and public sector organizations within guidelines set up by a board of directors or similar governing body. Plan, direct, or coordinate operational activities at the highest level of management with the help of subordinate executives and staff managers.
General and Operations Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate the operations of public or private sector organizations. Duties and responsibilities include formulating policies, managing daily operations, and planning the use of materials and human resources, but are too diverse and general in nature to be classified in any one functional area of management or administration, such as personnel, purchasing, or administrative services.
Sales Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate the actual distribution or movement of a product or service to the customer. Coordinate sales distribution by establishing sales territories, quotas, and goals and establish training programs for sales representatives. Analyze sales statistics gathered by staff to determine sales potential and inventory requirements and monitor the preferences of customers.
Administrative Services Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate one or more administrative services of an organization, such as records and information management, mail distribution, facilities planning and maintenance, custodial operations, and other office support services.
Industrial Production Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate the work activities and resources necessary for manufacturing products in accordance with cost, quality, and quantity specifications.
Transportation, Storage, and Distribution Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate transportation, storage, or distribution activities in accordance with organizational policies and applicable government laws or regulations. Includes logistics managers.
Construction Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate, usually through subordinate supervisory personnel, activities concerned with the construction and maintenance of structures, facilities, and systems. Participate in the conceptual development of a construction project and oversee its organization, scheduling, budgeting, and implementation. Includes managers in specialized construction fields, such as carpentry or plumbing.
Social and Community Service Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate the activities of a social service program or community outreach organization. Oversee the program or organization's budget and policies regarding participant involvement, program requirements, and benefits. Work may involve directing social workers, counselors, or probation officers.
Managers, All Other
All managers not listed separately.
Cost Estimators
Prepare cost estimates for product manufacturing, construction projects, or services to aid management in bidding on or determining price of product or service. May specialize according to particular service performed or type of product manufactured.
Management Analysts
Conduct organizational studies and evaluations, design systems and procedures, conduct work simplification and measurement studies, and prepare operations and procedures manuals to assist management in operating more efficiently and effectively. Includes program analysts and management consultants.
Business Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in business administration and management, such as accounting, finance, human resources, labor and industrial relations, marketing, and operations research. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.

Bachelor's

A program that prepares individuals to plan, design, and manage systems, processes, and facilities used to collect, store, secure, retrieve, analyze, and transmit medical records and other health information used by clinical professionals and health care organizations. Includes instruction in the principles and basic content of the biomedical and clinical sciences, information technology and applications, data and database management, clinical research methodologies, health information resources and systems, office management, legal requirements, and professional standards.

Job Opportunities:

Medical and Health Services Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate medical and health services in hospitals, clinics, managed care organizations, public health agencies, or similar organizations.

A program that prepares individuals to administer prescribed courses of radiation treatment, manage patients undergoing radiation therapy, and maintain pertinent records. Includes instruction in applied anatomy and physiology, oncologic pathology, radiation biology, radiation oncology procedures and techniques, radiation dosimetry, tumor localization, treatment planning, patient communication and management, data collection, record-keeping, and applicable standards and regulations.

Job Opportunities:

Health Specialties Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in health specialties, in fields such as dentistry, laboratory technology, medicine, pharmacy, public health, therapy, and veterinary medicine.
Radiation Therapists
Provide radiation therapy to patients as prescribed by a radiologist according to established practices and standards. Duties may include reviewing prescription and diagnosis; acting as liaison with physician and supportive care personnel; preparing equipment, such as immobilization, treatment, and protection devices; and maintaining records, reports, and files. May assist in dosimetry procedures and tumor localization.
Radiologic Technologists
Take x rays and CAT scans or administer nonradioactive materials into patient's blood stream for diagnostic purposes. Includes technologists who specialize in other scanning modalities.

A program that generally prepares individuals in the knowledge, techniques and procedures for promoting health, providing care for sick, disabled, infirmed, or other individuals or groups. Includes instruction in the administration of medication and treatments, assisting a physician during treatments and examinations, Referring patients to physicians and other health care specialists, and planning education for health maintenance.

Job Opportunities:

Nursing Instructors and Teachers, Postsecondary
Demonstrate and teach patient care in classroom and clinical units to nursing students. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.
Registered Nurses
Assess patient health problems and needs, develop and implement nursing care plans, and maintain medical records. Administer nursing care to ill, injured, convalescent, or disabled patients. May advise patients on health maintenance and disease prevention or provide case management. Licensing or registration required.

Associates

A program that prepares individuals to plan, design, and manage systems, processes, and facilities used to collect, store, secure, retrieve, analyze, and transmit medical records and other health information used by clinical professionals and health care organizations. Includes instruction in the principles and basic content of the biomedical and clinical sciences, information technology and applications, data and database management, clinical research methodologies, health information resources and systems, office management, legal requirements, and professional standards.

Job Opportunities:

Medical and Health Services Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate medical and health services in hospitals, clinics, managed care organizations, public health agencies, or similar organizations.

A program that prepares individuals to administer prescribed courses of radiation treatment, manage patients undergoing radiation therapy, and maintain pertinent records. Includes instruction in applied anatomy and physiology, oncologic pathology, radiation biology, radiation oncology procedures and techniques, radiation dosimetry, tumor localization, treatment planning, patient communication and management, data collection, record-keeping, and applicable standards and regulations.

Job Opportunities:

Health Specialties Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in health specialties, in fields such as dentistry, laboratory technology, medicine, pharmacy, public health, therapy, and veterinary medicine.
Radiation Therapists
Provide radiation therapy to patients as prescribed by a radiologist according to established practices and standards. Duties may include reviewing prescription and diagnosis; acting as liaison with physician and supportive care personnel; preparing equipment, such as immobilization, treatment, and protection devices; and maintaining records, reports, and files. May assist in dosimetry procedures and tumor localization.
Radiologic Technologists
Take x rays and CAT scans or administer nonradioactive materials into patient's blood stream for diagnostic purposes. Includes technologists who specialize in other scanning modalities.

A program that prepares individuals, under the supervision of a physical therapist, to implement physical therapy treatment care plans, train patients, conduct treatment interventions, use equipment, and observe and record patient progress. Includes instruction in applied anatomy and physiology, applied kinesiology, principles and procedures of physical therapy, basic neurology and orthopedics, physical therapy modalities, documentation skills, psychosocial aspects of health care, wound and injury care, electrotherapy, working with orthotics and prostheses, and personal and professional ethics.

Job Opportunities:

Physical Therapist Assistants
Assist physical therapists in providing physical therapy treatments and procedures. May, in accordance with State laws, assist in the development of treatment plans, carry out routine functions, document the progress of treatment, and modify specific treatments in accordance with patient status and within the scope of treatment plans established by a physical therapist. Generally requires formal training.

Administration & Faculty

President Dr. Louis Burgher
Accredited by North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, The Higher Learning Commission
Full-time Faculty 55
Student : Faculty Ratio 12 : 1
Faculty Gender (% Male : Female) 10 : 89
Percentage of Faculty Members
Non-Tenure Track Faculty 100

Admissions

Admissions

Selectivity

Acceptance Rate: 60.6% accepted of 71 applications

25th - 75th Percentile
ACTComposite22 - 26
English21 - 25
Math19 - 24
 

Finance

Finance

Average Net Tuition

The average student pays $17,024 for tuition, fees, and other expenses, after grants and scholarships.

Household Income Real Cost
$0-$30K $15,689
$30K-$48K $16,989
$48K-$75K $16,978
$75K-$110K $18,609
$110K+ $22,022

Sticker Price

Total stated tuition is $11,596, in-state and on-campus, before financial aid.

On-Campus Off-Campus
Stated Tuition $10,704 Same as On-Campus
Fees $504 Same as On-Campus
Housing $7,160 $8,100
Books $1,400 $1,400
Total (before financial aid) $19,768 $20,708

Students Receiving Aid

77% of students receive some form of financial aid.

Undergrads Receiving Aid Average Aid Amount
Federal Loans 91% $6,233
Federal Scholarships/Grants 33% $4,024
Institutional Grants 56% $4,781
Other Federal Grants 5% $1,400
Other Loans 23% $9,299
Pell Grants 33% $3,824
State and Local Scholarships/Grants 23% $1,100
Student Loans 91% $8,617

Alumni and Outcomes

Alumni and Outcomes

Graduation Rates

48% of students graduated in six years.

69% of full time students continued studying at this school after freshman year.

Rankings

WalletHub

#99 The Best and Worst College Cities and Towns in America
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