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At A Glance

Duke University School of Law

The first-year curriculum provides a firm grounding in the core subjects of the study of law and rigorous training in legal analysis, reasoning, and writing. Students take six semester-long courses: Civil Procedure, Constitutional Law, Contracts, Criminal Law, Property, and Torts, as well as a year-long Legal Analysis, Research, and Writing course. In the second and third years, students focus in a specialized area of study and practice and conduct their own independent study projects.

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Duke University School of Law's Full Profile

Program At a Glance

Total Program Enrollment 660
Incoming LSAT Scores (25th-75th Percentile) 166 - 170
Incoming GPA (25th-75th Percentile) 3.58 - 3.85
Bar Exam First Time Pass Rate 94.98%
Percent Employed (9 Months After Graduation) 95.2%
Tuition $51,662

Overview

Overview

About Duke University School of Law

The first-year curriculum provides a firm grounding in the core subjects of the study of law and rigorous training in legal analysis, reasoning, and writing. Students take six semester-long courses: Civil Procedure, Constitutional Law, Contracts, Criminal Law, Property, and Torts, as well as a year-long Legal Analysis, Research, and Writing course. In the second and third years, students focus in a specialized area of study and practice and conduct their own independent study projects.

Reviews

Though Duke University is nationally recognized for its stellar academic programs, students say it is the intimate atmosphere and emphasis on teaching that distinguishes their law school from other top-ranked institutions. Duke’s “ridiculously engaging” professors are “dedicated to both excellent scholarship and excellent teaching.” As at any prestigious school, the faculty’s “academic reputation is made from publishing”; how­ever, “the professors here want to be professors, [they are] not [here to] just write.” That dedication is amply demonstrated in the faculty’s incredible accessibility to their stu­dents. After class is out, “Professors all maintain an open door policy, and they actually mean it. You can just walk in and talk to them about class, other subjects you’re inter­ested in, careers, or where to find the best microbrew in Durham.” A current student fondly remembers, “My 1L Con Law professor came to our softball game and had us over to his house for a picnic, and a variety of upper-level professors enjoy bowling with us every week.” Enrolling just over 200 first-year students annually, Duke’s modest size practically ensures a personal relationship with the faculty: “With even the largest 1L classes topping out around 75, it’s easy for professors to know you by name, and it’s never hard to spend one-on-one time with professors if you want to.” Despite it’s all-around excellence, Duke is surprisingly down-to-earth. A current stu­dent details, “What really won me over about Duke was the school philosophy, as voiced by Dean Levi: ‘We take scholarship, service, professionalism, and teaching seriously; but we try not to take ourselves too seriously.’” To that end, the Duke culture “promotes a balanced life, instead of letting schoolwork consume you.” For example, the school’s “responsive administration” encourages students to pursue their personal passions, not just their required coursework. A 2L recounts, “Regarding the administration, they are very open to new ideas and flexible in their approach to the curriculum. One of my friends started a program to aid in Haiti’s reconstruction and the school has provided both financial and academic resources.” On that note, while “Duke expects initiative from students,” students have all of the “tools and opportunities” to reach their goals. Across departments, administrators and staff “are warm, friendly, and always available to help.” When it comes to schedule planning, “The academic advising department is fantastic and always available.”Proud of their unique community, “People really rally around Duke, including alumni, and the enthusiasm for the school is infectious.” In this context, it is easy for students to make “both personal and professional connections with alumni around the country.” When it comes to jobs and internships, “Duke isn’t the biggest law school, so it’s not going to have the sheer number of alums that Harvard, Columbia, Georgetown, and others have. However, it is the kind of place that inspires loyalty.” With that loyalty as an asset, Duke boasts “strong placement in numerous legal markets all over the country,” without a strong focus in any one region. Students point out the school’s “terrific connec­tions with federal judges” and a “fantastic network in New York,” yet feel that students are still placed in other markets across the United States. A current student affirms that, “Regardless of what you want to do (big law, government, non-profit, etc.) or where you want to work, you will find Duke grads who are willing to help you break into that particular field.”As one would expect from a high-ranking school, facilities are excellent at Duke. Within the School of Law, “All the classroom are stuffed to the gills with technology,” and “The common area is wide open, with huge windows and comfy chairs.” Throughout the classrooms, “the outlet:student ratio must be around 2:1.” Of particular importance to busy law students, “Goodson Library is amazing, homey, and comfort­able, and has all the resources you might ever need.” Upon using the facilities, “The research librarians and online guides are a great help with writing courses, general research, and journal work.”

- The Princeton Review

Academics

Academics

Degree Programs Offered

Graduates Last Year: 242

Description: A program that prepares individuals for the independent professional practice of law, for taking state and national bar examinations, and for advanced research in jurisprudence. Includes instruction in the theory and practice of the legal system, including the statutory, administrative, and judicial components of civil and criminal law.

Job Opportunities:

Lawyers
Represent clients in criminal and civil litigation and other legal proceedings, draw up legal documents, or manage or advise clients on legal transactions. May specialize in a single area or may practice broadly in many areas of law.
Judicial Law Clerks
Assist judges in court or by conducting research or preparing legal documents.
Administrative Law Judges, Adjudicators, and Hearing Officers
Conduct hearings to recommend or make decisions on claims concerning government programs or other government-related matters. Determine liability, sanctions, or penalties, or recommend the acceptance or rejection of claims or settlements.
Arbitrators, Mediators, and Conciliators
Facilitate negotiation and conflict resolution through dialogue. Resolve conflicts outside of the court system by mutual consent of parties involved.
Judges, Magistrate Judges, and Magistrates
Arbitrate, advise, adjudicate, or administer justice in a court of law. May sentence defendant in criminal cases according to government statutes or sentencing guidelines. May determine liability of defendant in civil cases. May perform wedding ceremonies.
Law Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in law. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.

Graduates Last Year: 0

Description: A program that prepares individuals for the independent professional practice of law, for taking state and national bar examinations, and for advanced research in jurisprudence. Includes instruction in the theory and practice of the legal system, including the statutory, administrative, and judicial components of civil and criminal law.

Job Opportunities:

Lawyers
Represent clients in criminal and civil litigation and other legal proceedings, draw up legal documents, or manage or advise clients on legal transactions. May specialize in a single area or may practice broadly in many areas of law.
Judicial Law Clerks
Assist judges in court or by conducting research or preparing legal documents.
Administrative Law Judges, Adjudicators, and Hearing Officers
Conduct hearings to recommend or make decisions on claims concerning government programs or other government-related matters. Determine liability, sanctions, or penalties, or recommend the acceptance or rejection of claims or settlements.
Arbitrators, Mediators, and Conciliators
Facilitate negotiation and conflict resolution through dialogue. Resolve conflicts outside of the court system by mutual consent of parties involved.
Judges, Magistrate Judges, and Magistrates
Arbitrate, advise, adjudicate, or administer justice in a court of law. May sentence defendant in criminal cases according to government statutes or sentencing guidelines. May determine liability of defendant in civil cases. May perform wedding ceremonies.
Law Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in law. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.

Joint Degree Programs Offered

JD/LLM in International & Comparative Law (3.5 years); JD/MA (3.5 years) in Art History, Cultural Anthropology, East Asian Studies, Economics, Engineering Management, English, Environmental Science and Policy, History, Humanities, Literature, Philosophy, Political Science, Religion, Romance Studies, Sociology; JD/MS (3.5 years) in Biomedical Engineering, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Mechanical Engineering; JD/MBA, JD/MPP, JD/MEM, JD/MTS (4 years); JD/MD (6 years); JD/PhD (7 years)

Faculty Information

Total Faculty 122
Full-Time Faculty 71
Deans, Librarians, and Others Who Teach 14
Part-Time Faculty 37
Faculty Gender 59% Male
40% Female
Student Teacher Ratio 9 : 1

Accreditation

Accredited by American Bar Association

Student Body

Student Body
Gender Breakdown 59% Male
41% Female
Student Diversity
Percentage
White 68%
Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander 0%
Multi-racial 1%
International 3%
Hispanic/Latino 6%
Ethnicity Unknown 2%
Black or African American 7%
Asian 12%
American Indian or Alaska Native 0%

Finance

Finance

Sticker Price

On-Campus Off-Campus
Stated Tuition $51,662 Same as On-Campus
Housing N/A N/A
Books N/A N/A
Total (before financial aid) $51,662 $51,662

Financial Aid

Admissions

Admissions

Application Information

Deadline for Regular Decision: February 15

Average Age Admitted: 24

Incoming Class

Duke University School of Law's entering class of 2012 enrolled having these exam grades:

Exam Enrollment Type 25th - 75th Percentile
LSAT Full-Time 166 - 170
LSAT Total 166 - 170

Duke University School of Law's entering class of 2012 enrolled having these college GPA's:

Enrollment Type 25th - 75th Percentile
Full-Time 3.58 - 3.85
Total 3.58 - 3.85

Admission Considerations

Very Important: Undergraduate GPA, Personal Essay

Important: Recommendations

Admission Requirements

Required: Standardized Test Scores, Extracurricular Activities, Recommendations, Undergraduate GPA, Personal Essay

Optional: Interview, Work Experience, State Residency

Rankings

Rankings

The Princeton Review

#1 Best Quality of Life
#2 Best Professors
#3 Best Classroom Experience
#8 Toughest To Get Into

Outcomes

Outcomes

Bar Exam Results

Percent Reporting 93%
First Time Pass Rate 95%
Avg. Pass Rate In This State 82%

Employment

Percent Employed (9 Months After Graduation) 95%
Job Sector Number of Graduates Percent of Graduates
Firm Sized 2-10 4 2%
Firm Sized 11-25 3 1%
Firm Sized 26-50 1 1%
Firm Sized 51-100 1 0%
Firm Sized 101-250 4 2%
Firm Sized 251-500 21 10%
Firm Sized 501+ 92 42%
Business Industry 12 6%
Government 13 6%
Public Interest 19 9%
Federal Clerkship 31 14%
State Clerkship 15 7%
Academia 1 0%
Unemployed Number of Graduates Percent of Graduates
Unemployed, Not Seeking 2 1%
Unemployed, Seeking 3 1%
Pursuing Graduate Degree 2 1%

Top Employment Locations

State Percent Employed
CA 12%
DC 14%
NY 22%
International 2%

Associations & Memberships

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