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At A Glance

Texas A&M University School of Law

The full-time day program allows you to concentrate on the law school experience, including extracurricular activities, leadership opportunities, networking and community service. The time spent focusing on education allows you the chance to reflect on career progress and to consider your future goals. The duration of the full-time program is also typically shorter than the part-time programs. The full-time day division program includes a three-year course of study, consisting of 14-week fall and spring semesters. Full-time day students are admitted in the fall of each academic year. A seven-week summer session, with a limited course load, is available for full-time and part-time students.

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Texas A&M University School of Law's Full Profile

Program At a Glance

Total Program Enrollment 738
Incoming LSAT Scores (25th-75th Percentile) 149 - 155
Incoming GPA (25th-75th Percentile) 2.84 - 3.34
Bar Exam First Time Pass Rate 87.44%
Tuition $30,580

Overview

Overview

About Texas A&M University School of Law

The full-time day program allows you to concentrate on the law school experience, including extracurricular activities, leadership opportunities, networking and community service. The time spent focusing on education allows you the chance to reflect on career progress and to consider your future goals. The duration of the full-time program is also typically shorter than the part-time programs. The full-time day division program includes a three-year course of study, consisting of 14-week fall and spring semesters. Full-time day students are admitted in the fall of each academic year. A seven-week summer session, with a limited course load, is available for full-time and part-time students.

Reviews

Established in 1989, the School of Law at Texas Wesleyan University is an up-andcomer that offers a solid education, an excellent price tag, and a good bar passage rate (a main focus of the curriculum and pride of the school). "It's really nice to feel a part of a young school that is on the rise!" says a 1L. The school takes extraordinary effort to not only teach legal theory, but to "prepare students for the bar and for employment in the legal community." There are many opportunities to gain real-world experience, as well as many practicum courses designed to simulate what an attorney will be faced with on a daily basis once admitted to the bar. The legal writing program is rigorous (three semesters required) and "the writing professors emphasize real-world legal writing skills to impress a busy judge." Facilities are essentially brand-new, classrooms are state-of- the-art with interactive AV components, the building is equipped with wireless internet access, and the school itself "is always clean and secure with controlled keycard access." Students appreciate that the law school's location is away from the main campus right in the middle of downtown Fort Worth, which is a "great town to live in." The administration "will bend over backward to help you" and "seems to have an uncanny knack for remembering first names." "My first impression as a 1L-returning student was that everyone on the staff, from the dean of the law school to the maintenance staff, was committed to the students' success. Now, as a jaded 3L, I still believe that," says a student. School name recognition could use some work here, however, "Texas Wesleyan is a newer school and "it is sometimes difficult to get your foot in the door with the bigger firms." However, some students are so proud of the education they're receiving that they see the school's youth as a strength, as they gladly feel up to the task of "forcing those in the legal community to recognize that there is another great legal education being established in this state." The professors at the school are "exceptional" and "make every effort to be available for students." They ensure students "really feel as though we are part of a bigger calling, and not just corralled through classes." Classes are smaller here, so if you are not prepared, "the professors will not be happy with you [if you are not prepared for class]." There's great flexibility in scheduling, so students that can only attend classes in the evening are taken care of, though night students would like more options in their classes, and day students would like more specializations. The school has a public service message running throughout its curriculum, and things like the Pro Bono Family Law Clinic "make a difference in people's lives every day."

- The Princeton Review

Student Body

Student Body
Gender Breakdown 51% Male
49% Female
Student Diversity
Percentage
White 72%
Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander 0%
Multi-racial 3%
Hispanic/Latino 11%
Ethnicity Unknown 3%
Black or African American 5%
Asian 4%
American Indian or Alaska Native 1%

Finance

Finance

Sticker Price

On-Campus Off-Campus
Stated Tuition $30,580 Same as On-Campus
Housing N/A N/A
Books N/A N/A
Total (before financial aid) $30,580 $30,580

Financial Aid

89% Graduate students receiving financial aid (loans and grants)

$36,529 Average financial aid amount

Admissions

Admissions

Application Information

Deadline for Regular Decision: March 31

Average Age Admitted: 25

Application Fee: $55

Incoming Class

Texas A&M University School of Law's entering class of 2012 enrolled having these exam grades:

Exam Enrollment Type 25th - 75th Percentile
LSAT Total 149 - 155

Texas A&M University School of Law's entering class of 2012 enrolled having these college GPA's:

Enrollment Type 25th - 75th Percentile
Full-Time 2.86 - 3.35
Part-Time 2.61 - 3.33
Total 2.84 - 3.34

Admission Considerations

Very Important: Recommendations, Undergraduate GPA, Personal Essay

Admission Requirements

Required: Standardized Test Scores, Personal Essay, Recommendations, Undergraduate GPA, Resume

Optional: Work Experience, Academic GPA, Extracurricular Activities, Interview

Outcomes

Outcomes

Bar Exam Results

Percent Reporting 97%
First Time Pass Rate 87%
Avg. Pass Rate In This State 86%
Job Sector Number of Graduates Percent of Graduates
Firm Sized 2-10 63 38%
Firm Sized 11-25 11 7%
Firm Sized 26-50 3 7%
Firm Sized 51-100 3 2%
Firm Sized 101-250 2 1%
Firm Sized 501+ 1 1%
Business Industry 34 21%
Government 23 14%
Public Interest 1 1%
Federal Clerkship 1 1%
State Clerkship 2 1%
Academia 5 3%
Unknown Employer Type 5 3%
Unemployed Number of Graduates Percent of Graduates
Unemployed, Not Seeking 1 0%
Unemployed, Seeking 23 11%

Top Employment Locations

State Percent Employed
CO 1%
OK 2%
TX 90%

Famous Alumni

Well known alumni of Texas A&M University School of Law include:

  • Phil King - State Representative, 61st District
  • Nancy Berger - Judge, 322nd District Family Court of Tarrant County
  • Susan Hawk - Judge, 291st Criminal District Court
  • Carlos Cortez - Judge, 44th District of Dallas County
  • Craig Watkins - Dallas County District Attorney
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