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At A Glance

The University of Mississippi School of Law

The Cambridge Summer Session, in existence since 1983, was one of the first programs to be approved under the ABA's foreign summer program standards. It currently meets all applicable ABA and AALS requirements. Credit hours earned are routinely transferred to other ABA-approved law schools and to recognized Canadian law schools (some Canadian law schools will not award credits for U.S. summer programs). Acceptance of any credit or grade for any course taken in the program is subject to approval by the student's home law school. Interested students should inquire at their home schools about the transfer of credits and about the amount of residence credit that may be obtained, consistent with ABA Standard 305, Interpretation 4. Courses are offered for two semester hours credit; students may register for up to three classes (maximum of 6 credit hours). See the Class and final examination schedule, above, for class meeting times. No classes are scheduled on Friday, but there will be a group excursion to London on one Friday.

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The University of Mississippi School of Law's Full Profile

Program At a Glance

Total Program Enrollment 520
Incoming LSAT Scores (25th-75th Percentile) 151 - 157
Incoming GPA (25th-75th Percentile) 3.07 - 3.67
Bar Exam First Time Pass Rate 83.74%
Percent Employed (9 Months After Graduation) 95.5%
In State Tuition $11,293
Out of State Tuition $24,692

Overview

Overview

About The University of Mississippi School of Law

The Cambridge Summer Session, in existence since 1983, was one of the first programs to be approved under the ABA's foreign summer program standards. It currently meets all applicable ABA and AALS requirements. Credit hours earned are routinely transferred to other ABA-approved law schools and to recognized Canadian law schools (some Canadian law schools will not award credits for U.S. summer programs). Acceptance of any credit or grade for any course taken in the program is subject to approval by the student's home law school. Interested students should inquire at their home schools about the transfer of credits and about the amount of residence credit that may be obtained, consistent with ABA Standard 305, Interpretation 4. Courses are offered for two semester hours credit; students may register for up to three classes (maximum of 6 credit hours). See the Class and final examination schedule, above, for class meeting times. No classes are scheduled on Friday, but there will be a group excursion to London on one Friday.

Reviews

Students at Ole Miss love the combination of “a down-home, small-town atmosphere where everyone knows your name” and a law degree that is “given much credit within the state.” Though “academically strenuous,” the school’s “laid-back atmosphere” prevails, and students praise the “easily accessible” staff, the “large student mall with plenty of couches and chairs for discussions between classes,” and the “professors with awesome senses of humor.” By all accounts, Ole Miss is not a school that “makes you feel like they are trying to weed you out.” As one student explains, “I love the dynamics of the classes and the size of the student body. It is nice to be friends with 2Ls and 3Ls and not feel like a freshman again.” “Everyone in the administration is incredibly friendly and helpful,” a classmate adds. “If you have any question, even if it has nothing to do with their particular job, they will do everything they can to get you the right answer.” Professors here hail from “a broad diversity of backgrounds” and “are all extremely knowledgeable and very experienced.” Not only do they “present the material in an entertaining way,” they “take a special interest” in students, “which can help build up [students’] confidence and help them to excel.”The professors at Ole Miss are a major reason why its students say the school is a “great value.” “It is not nearly as expensive to go to school here as the other schools to which I applied or was accepted,” says one student. “I can still get pretty much any job I want coming out of Ole Miss, yet I have zero debt.” Other students, however, temper such expectations, noting that while Ole Miss’ “Career Services Office is always there to help with a resume or to provide Tylenol during exams,” securing a job outside of Mississippi can be an uphill battle. That said, this situation seems to be on the upswing thanks to the school’s “great relationship with alumni” and also in that “Ole Miss changed their grading curve [a few years ago] and that has significantly helped those who are looking to get a job out of state.”Students consistently report that the faculty is one of the school’s “greatest strengths.” “They take away the mundane, stereotypical experience of law school and present the material in an entertaining way without compromising the integrity of the institution,” says one student. Many feel that “there is a lot of potential in the legal writing and research classes”; however, they are damaged by “the lack of communication between...depart­ments.” Others would like “more classes to choose from,” particularly in the area of entertainment law. Students are divided on the school’s aesthetics, finding that the “great library” is “extremely up to date with the latest technology” while the building itself is “not very pretty” and “somewhat outdated.” A 1L provides some perspective, explaining that “the law school building would be aesthetically pleasing at most major schools, but when compared to the columned architecture and tree-lined walkways of the rest of the campus, you can immediately tell it is a relic of the early 1970s...Instead of being ‘post­modern,’ it simply looks out of place.” However, “a new state-of-the-art building” “will soon be under construction.”

- The Princeton Review

Academics

Academics

Degree Programs Offered

Graduates Last Year: 188

Description: A program that prepares individuals for the independent professional practice of law, for taking state and national bar examinations, and for advanced research in jurisprudence. Includes instruction in the theory and practice of the legal system, including the statutory, administrative, and judicial components of civil and criminal law.

Job Opportunities:

Lawyers
Represent clients in criminal and civil litigation and other legal proceedings, draw up legal documents, or manage or advise clients on legal transactions. May specialize in a single area or may practice broadly in many areas of law.
Judicial Law Clerks
Assist judges in court or by conducting research or preparing legal documents.
Administrative Law Judges, Adjudicators, and Hearing Officers
Conduct hearings to recommend or make decisions on claims concerning government programs or other government-related matters. Determine liability, sanctions, or penalties, or recommend the acceptance or rejection of claims or settlements.
Arbitrators, Mediators, and Conciliators
Facilitate negotiation and conflict resolution through dialogue. Resolve conflicts outside of the court system by mutual consent of parties involved.
Judges, Magistrate Judges, and Magistrates
Arbitrate, advise, adjudicate, or administer justice in a court of law. May sentence defendant in criminal cases according to government statutes or sentencing guidelines. May determine liability of defendant in civil cases. May perform wedding ceremonies.
Law Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in law. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.

Joint Degree Programs Offered

JD/MBA: 4 years JD/MA - Tax: 4 years JD/MA - Accounting: 4 years

Specialty Law Programs

  • Commercial
  • Corporation Securities
  • Criminal
  • Environmental
  • International
  • Taxation

Faculty Information

Total Faculty 48
Full-Time Faculty 29
Deans, Librarians, and Others Who Teach 6
Part-Time Faculty 13
Faculty Gender 58% Male
41% Female
Student Teacher Ratio 15 : 1

Accreditation

Accredited by American Bar Association

Student Body

Student Body
Gender Breakdown 58% Male
42% Female
Student Diversity
Percentage
White 82%
Multi-racial 0%
Hispanic/Latino 3%
Black or African American 13%
Asian 1%
American Indian or Alaska Native 1%

Finance

Finance

Sticker Price

In-State

On-Campus Off-Campus
Stated Tuition $11,293 Same as On-Campus
Housing $18,832 N/A
Books N/A N/A
Total (before financial aid) $30,125 $11,293

Out-of-State

On-Campus Off-Campus
Stated Tuition $24,692 Same as On-Campus
Housing $18,832 N/A
Books N/A N/A
Total (before financial aid) $43,524 $24,692

Financial Aid

Admissions

Admissions

Application Information

Deadline for Regular Decision: March 1

Average Age Admitted: 24

Application Fee: $40

Incoming Class

The University of Mississippi School of Law's entering class of 2012 enrolled having these exam grades:

Exam Enrollment Type 25th - 75th Percentile
LSAT Full-Time 151 - 157
LSAT Total 151 - 157

The University of Mississippi School of Law's entering class of 2012 enrolled having these college GPA's:

Enrollment Type 25th - 75th Percentile
Full-Time 3.07 - 3.67
Total 3.07 - 3.67

Admission Considerations

Very Important: Recommendations, Undergraduate GPA, Personal Essay

Admission Requirements

Required: Personal Essay, Recommendations, Undergraduate GPA, Standardized Test Scores

Optional: Work Experience, Extracurricular Activities, Interview, State Residency

Outcomes

Outcomes

Bar Exam Results

Percent Reporting 79%
First Time Pass Rate 84%
Avg. Pass Rate In This State 81%

Campus Recruitment

Number of Employers Recruiting on Campus 80
First Year Recruitment Time Summer
Second Year Recruitment Time Summer

Employment

Percent Employed (9 Months After Graduation) 96%
Average Starting Salary $64,025
Job Sector Number of Graduates Percent of Graduates
Firm Sized 2-10 36 28%
Firm Sized 11-25 12 9%
Firm Sized 26-50 6 9%
Firm Sized 51-100 1 1%
Firm Sized 101-250 7 5%
Firm Sized 251-500 4 3%
Firm Sized 501+ 4 3%
Business Industry 13 10%
Government 18 14%
Public Interest 4 3%
Federal Clerkship 6 5%
State Clerkship 9 7%
Other Clerkship 1 1%
Academia 4 3%
Unknown Employer Type 1 1%
Unemployed Number of Graduates Percent of Graduates
Unemployed, Not Seeking 6 4%
Unemployed, Seeking 18 11%
Pursuing Graduate Degree 6 4%

Top Employment Locations

State Percent Employed
AL 5%
TN 11%
MS 58%

Famous Alumni

Well known alumni of The University of Mississippi School of Law include:

  • Robert C. Khayat - Chancellor, The University of Mississippi
  • John Grisham - Author
  • Thad Cochran - U.S. Senator
  • C. Trent Lott - Former U.S. Senator

Associations & Memberships

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