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At A Glance

University of Wisconsin Law School

Students at the UW Law School have many opportunities to experience our law-in-action philosophy -- an approach that differentiates it from other law schools. Our extensive curriculum places an emphasis on the dynamics of the law: how the law both reflects and causes social change, and how the law as it is practiced can differ from the law described in the statutes.

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University of Wisconsin Law School's Full Profile

Program At a Glance

Total Program Enrollment 732
Incoming LSAT Scores (25th-75th Percentile) 157 - 164
Incoming GPA (25th-75th Percentile) 3.33 - 3.72
Bar Exam First Time Pass Rate 99.6%
Percent Employed (9 Months After Graduation) 90.0%
In State Tuition $21,347
Out of State Tuition $40,043

Overview

Overview

About University of Wisconsin Law School

Students at the UW Law School have many opportunities to experience our law-in-action philosophy -- an approach that differentiates it from other law schools. Our extensive curriculum places an emphasis on the dynamics of the law: how the law both reflects and causes social change, and how the law as it is practiced can differ from the law described in the statutes.

Reviews

University of Wisconsin Law School is considered to be “the flagship law school in the state [of Wisconsin],” offering “a great legal education” and hosting some of “the best and brightest legal minds” on its illustrious faculty. Though students admit that professors can “vary in teaching styles” and “in their teaching abilities,” nearly all agree that “it’s clear that our professors are respected in Wisconsin and the nation.” “It’s exciting taking crimi­nal law courses with professors who wrote the criminal code in Wisconsin and have an ongoing impact on criminal law in the state,” says a 2L. “There are professors that are former Wisconsin Supreme Court Justices, former ‘big law’ partners, current appointees on national and international committees, and other well-respected scholars in their field.” Professors teach “subjects that they enjoy and can shed real-life experience on, which really helps you to imagine using that law in practice.” At the same time, “Many of the professors are old,” and, as they retire, students would like the school to “bring in young­er, top-notch professors.” Along those lines, UW recently hired new faculty in tax, constitutional law, civil procedure, and other key areas. The administration can be “very accessible and accommodating of students,” though some feel that it is “too disconnected” and a “little slow in getting out the class schedules.”Classes become “relatively small” after 1L (where “eighty [students in class] is the norm”), giving “everyone [the] opportunity to speak and learn in a smaller setting.” But that’s not to say there aren’t small classes for 1Ls. “Keeping the 1L legal writing courses at only twelve students always increases interaction between each student and professor,” says a 1L. Despite its intimacy, some students felt the “the legal writing program could be improved [as the school] does not put enough emphasis on writing or provide courses that teach students how to write the documents they are most likely to write as lawyers.” In response, the UW hired a new Legal Writing Director, who has redesigned the program. On the upside, there are “significant opportunities” for “practical experience” through legal clinics and electives, but taking part in these relies on students being motivated to seek them out. “[UW Law] doesn’t work to make sure that students are getting the practi­cal ‘Law in Action’ experience they need in the classroom,” says a 2L. “It’s left to the stu­dents to get involved in a clinical. Yet, due to the realities of law school and the economy, this is not always a feasible option.”On the job front, the common consensus among students is that “Career Services needs to be revamped.” UW Law answered these concerns by hiring an experienced Assistant Dean and new Director. A 2L adds, “I think that Career Services could be a little more creative, knowledgeable, and proactive.” Luckily, the school’s “proximity” to Chicago means that students have a large job market nearby in which they can “visit law firms” and “interview for jobs.”The law building is “located on Bascom Hill,” considered to be “the focal point of the campus,” however students aren’t positive it deserves such a prominent view. “The older parts of the building are beyond outdated,” says a 1L. A 2L concurs: “Although the building is in good condition and well-maintained, the furniture in the classrooms and library could be nicer.” Classrooms have “wireless Internet, electric outlets, and projection screens,” and while the building itself doesn’t have the “elegant wood floors and paneling of some places,” it’s “more modern and functional than [other schools].” “Some of the technology in the classrooms is not as ‘spiffy’ as private schools, but the wonderful professors and overall supportive academic environment more than make up for these shortcomings,” says a 1L.

- The Princeton Review

Academics

Academics

Degree Programs Offered

Graduates Last Year: 255

Description: A program that prepares individuals for the independent professional practice of law, for taking state and national bar examinations, and for advanced research in jurisprudence. Includes instruction in the theory and practice of the legal system, including the statutory, administrative, and judicial components of civil and criminal law.

Job Opportunities:

Lawyers
Represent clients in criminal and civil litigation and other legal proceedings, draw up legal documents, or manage or advise clients on legal transactions. May specialize in a single area or may practice broadly in many areas of law.
Judicial Law Clerks
Assist judges in court or by conducting research or preparing legal documents.
Administrative Law Judges, Adjudicators, and Hearing Officers
Conduct hearings to recommend or make decisions on claims concerning government programs or other government-related matters. Determine liability, sanctions, or penalties, or recommend the acceptance or rejection of claims or settlements.
Arbitrators, Mediators, and Conciliators
Facilitate negotiation and conflict resolution through dialogue. Resolve conflicts outside of the court system by mutual consent of parties involved.
Judges, Magistrate Judges, and Magistrates
Arbitrate, advise, adjudicate, or administer justice in a court of law. May sentence defendant in criminal cases according to government statutes or sentencing guidelines. May determine liability of defendant in civil cases. May perform wedding ceremonies.
Law Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in law. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.

Joint Degree Programs Offered

Dual degree master’s programs generally take four years to complete. Programs include: business, environmental studies, Latin American studies, library and information studies, public affairs, public health, philosophy, political science and sociology. Several dual Ph.D. programs are also available.

Specialty Law Programs

  • Criminal
  • Environmental
  • International
  • Labor
  • Property
  • Intellectual Property

Faculty Information

Total Faculty 123
Full-Time Faculty 64
Deans, Librarians, and Others Who Teach 5
Part-Time Faculty 54
Faculty Gender 53% Male
46% Female
Student Teacher Ratio 11 : 1

Accreditation

Accredited by American Bar Association

Student Body

Student Body
Gender Breakdown 59% Male
41% Female
Student Diversity
Percentage
White 72%
Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander 0%
Multi-racial 3%
International 3%
Hispanic/Latino 7%
Ethnicity Unknown 3%
Black or African American 6%
Asian 4%
American Indian or Alaska Native 2%

Finance

Finance

Sticker Price

In-State

On-Campus Off-Campus
Stated Tuition $21,347 Same as On-Campus
Housing $9,790 N/A
Books N/A N/A
Total (before financial aid) $31,137 $21,347

Out-of-State

On-Campus Off-Campus
Stated Tuition $40,043 Same as On-Campus
Housing $9,790 N/A
Books N/A N/A
Total (before financial aid) $49,833 $40,043

Financial Aid

90% Graduate students receiving financial aid (loans and grants)

Admissions

Admissions

Application Information

Deadline for Regular Decision: April 1

Average Age Admitted: 24

Application Fee: $56

Incoming Class

University of Wisconsin Law School's entering class of 2012 enrolled having these exam grades:

Exam Enrollment Type 25th - 75th Percentile
LSAT Full-Time 157 - 164
LSAT Total 157 - 164

University of Wisconsin Law School's entering class of 2012 enrolled having these college GPA's:

Enrollment Type 25th - 75th Percentile
Full-Time 3.33 - 3.72
Total 3.33 - 3.72

Admission Considerations

Also Considered: Undergraduate GPA, Recommendations, Personal Essay

Admission Requirements

Required: Standardized Test Scores, Recommendations, Undergraduate GPA, Record of Residence, Personal Essay

Optional: Extracurricular Activities, Interview, Work Experience, State Residency

Rankings

Rankings

U.S. News & World Report

#76 National Universities Top Public Rankings
#145 National Universities
#164 National Universities High School Counselor Rankings

Outcomes

Outcomes

Bar Exam Results

Percent Reporting 100%
First Time Pass Rate 100%
Avg. Pass Rate In This State 88%

Campus Recruitment

Number of Employers Recruiting on Campus 110
Second Year Recruitment Time Summer

Employment

Percent Employed (9 Months After Graduation) 90%
Average Starting Salary $59,987
Job Sector Number of Graduates Percent of Graduates
Firm Sized 2-10 54 21%
Firm Sized 11-25 11 4%
Firm Sized 26-50 7 4%
Firm Sized 51-100 5 2%
Firm Sized 101-250 14 5%
Firm Sized 251-500 4 2%
Firm Sized 501+ 11 4%
Business Industry 51 20%
Government 34 13%
Public Interest 26 10%
Federal Clerkship 3 1%
State Clerkship 10 4%
Other Clerkship 1 0%
Academia 13 5%
Unknown Employer Type 1 0%
Unemployed Number of Graduates Percent of Graduates
Unemployed, Not Seeking 2 1%
Unemployed, Seeking 18 6%
Pursuing Graduate Degree 6 2%

Top Employment Locations

State Percent Employed
IL 7%
DC 7%
WI 65%
International 2%

Famous Alumni

Well known alumni of University of Wisconsin Law School include:

  • Bridget Brennan Â’83 - Special Narcotics Prosecutor for the City of New York.
  • John Rowe '70 - Emeritus chairman of Exelon Corporation.
  • David Ruder '57 - Former chairman of the SEC; emeritus professor and former dean of Northwestern Law.
  • Tammy Baldwin ‘89 - U.S. senator, former U.S. congresswoman.
  • Tommy Thompson '66 - Former U.S secretary of health and human services, former governor of Wisconsin.

Associations & Memberships

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