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At A Glance

University of North Carolina School of Law

The J.D. program at UNC School of Law provides students with a broad legal education that will prepare them to begin their legal careers at a high level of readiness to pursue their professional goals. In recent years, law schools nationwide have been responding to the legal community's need for students to obtain additional practical skills while in school, and Carolina has responded with curriculum changes and additional extracurricular skills-training programs and offerings.

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University of North Carolina School of Law's Full Profile

Program At a Glance

Total Program Enrollment 741
Incoming LSAT Scores (25th-75th Percentile) 160 - 164
Incoming GPA (25th-75th Percentile) 3.33 - 3.69
Bar Exam First Time Pass Rate 90.43%
Percent Employed (9 Months After Graduation) 91.0%
In State Tuition $21,556
Out of State Tuition $37,066

Overview

Overview

About University of North Carolina School of Law

The J.D. program at UNC School of Law provides students with a broad legal education that will prepare them to begin their legal careers at a high level of readiness to pursue their professional goals. In recent years, law schools nationwide have been responding to the legal community's need for students to obtain additional practical skills while in school, and Carolina has responded with curriculum changes and additional extracurricular skills-training programs and offerings.

Reviews

The School of Law at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is, according to students, “one of the best public law schools in the country.” Many claim that “the fac­ulty here couldn’t be more down to earth and accessible.” They have “a literal ‘my-door-is-open-all-the-time policy’ and never hesitate to “[take] the time to talk to every single student before class.” Still, some students feel that “there is a strong liberal bias at the school” and that professors sometimes “bring their political views with them into the classroom.” To correct this, they are calling for the law school to “improve on fostering a more diverse political atmosphere.” UNC Law’s “excellent” and “accessible” adminis­tration is “unparalleled” in its efforts to promote a “positive and supportive environment for the study of law.” Everyone here seems to practice “the ‘We’re all family at UNC’ motto to a fault.” Most UNC survey respondents are pleased about their employment prospects. One student credits the Career Services Office as being “the greatest strength of UNC. Even when they are too busy for a brief meeting about resumes or cover letters, you can just leave your stuff under the door, and someone will get it back to you by the next day with recommendations about what you should fix.” However, some feel that it could “stand to improve, particularly with communicating jobs to 1Ls.” However, jobs in North Carolina and neighboring states are fairly abundant, though, in large part because the law school maintains “strong connections” with in-state employers. Student organizations and learning opportunities are aplenty. According to one student, “There are lots of organizations to get involved in, and the pro bono program is one of the best.” About 60 percent of all students do some kind of pro bono work—many during the summer or during winter or spring breaks. Students who have performed more than seventy-five hours of pro bono service receive certificates of acknowledgment from the state bar association, and those who perform more than 100 hours of pro bono service get special shout-outs at graduation. Other notables include UNC’s clinical programs, in which students handle more than 350 civil and criminal cases every year and “really get a lot of hands-on experience” along with “solid academic[s]” in the process. Joint-degree programs include the standard JD/MBA as well as master’s of public policy science and a handful of others. UNC also offers a summer program down under in Sydney, Australia, that concentrates on Pacific Rim issues and semester-long programs in Europe and Mexico.The general consensus is that facilities at UNC are middling, but in terms of the avail­ability of information, “The resources are outstanding.” Also, “The school is improving the technology of each classroom every year.” In the meantime, a cry of “more parking!” can be heard throughout campus.

- The Princeton Review

Academics

Academics

Degree Programs Offered

Graduates Last Year: 6

Description: A program that prepares lawyers educated outside the United States to understand U. S. or Canadian law and jurisprudence.

Job Opportunities:

Lawyers
Represent clients in criminal and civil litigation and other legal proceedings, draw up legal documents, or manage or advise clients on legal transactions. May specialize in a single area or may practice broadly in many areas of law.

Graduates Last Year: 247

Description: A program that prepares individuals for the independent professional practice of law, for taking state and national bar examinations, and for advanced research in jurisprudence. Includes instruction in the theory and practice of the legal system, including the statutory, administrative, and judicial components of civil and criminal law.

Job Opportunities:

Lawyers
Represent clients in criminal and civil litigation and other legal proceedings, draw up legal documents, or manage or advise clients on legal transactions. May specialize in a single area or may practice broadly in many areas of law.
Judicial Law Clerks
Assist judges in court or by conducting research or preparing legal documents.
Administrative Law Judges, Adjudicators, and Hearing Officers
Conduct hearings to recommend or make decisions on claims concerning government programs or other government-related matters. Determine liability, sanctions, or penalties, or recommend the acceptance or rejection of claims or settlements.
Arbitrators, Mediators, and Conciliators
Facilitate negotiation and conflict resolution through dialogue. Resolve conflicts outside of the court system by mutual consent of parties involved.
Judges, Magistrate Judges, and Magistrates
Arbitrate, advise, adjudicate, or administer justice in a court of law. May sentence defendant in criminal cases according to government statutes or sentencing guidelines. May determine liability of defendant in civil cases. May perform wedding ceremonies.
Law Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in law. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.

Joint Degree Programs Offered

JD/MBA, 4 years; JD/MPA, 4 years; JD/MPPS, 4 years; JD/MPH, 4 years; JD/MRP, 4 years; JD/MSW, 4 years; JD/M.A S.A., 4 years; JD/MALS or MSIS, 4 years; JD/M.A.M.C., 4 years

Specialty Law Programs

  • Civil Procedure
  • Commercial
  • Constitutional
  • Corporation Securities
  • Criminal
  • Environmental
  • Government Services
  • Human Rights
  • International
  • Labor
  • Legal History
  • Legal Philosophy
  • Property
  • Taxation
  • Intellectual Property

Faculty Information

Total Faculty 99
Full-Time Faculty 51
Deans, Librarians, and Others Who Teach 15
Part-Time Faculty 33
Faculty Gender 60% Male
39% Female
Student Teacher Ratio 13 : 1

Accreditation

Accredited by American Bar Association

Student Body

Student Body
Gender Breakdown 51% Male
49% Female
Student Diversity
Percentage
White 60%
Multi-racial 5%
International 1%
Hispanic/Latino 8%
Ethnicity Unknown 14%
Black or African American 8%
Asian 5%
American Indian or Alaska Native 1%

Finance

Finance

Sticker Price

In-State

On-Campus Off-Campus
Stated Tuition $21,556 Same as On-Campus
Housing $14,990 N/A
Books N/A N/A
Total (before financial aid) $36,546 $21,556

Out-of-State

On-Campus Off-Campus
Stated Tuition $37,066 Same as On-Campus
Housing $14,990 N/A
Books N/A N/A
Total (before financial aid) $52,056 $37,066

Financial Aid

92% Graduate students receiving financial aid (loans and grants)

$29,676 Average financial aid amount

Admissions

Admissions

Application Information

Deadline for Regular Decision: March 1

Average Age Admitted: 23

Application Fee: $75

Incoming Class

University of North Carolina School of Law's entering class of 2012 enrolled having these exam grades:

Exam Enrollment Type 25th - 75th Percentile
LSAT Full-Time 160 - 164
LSAT Total 160 - 164

University of North Carolina School of Law's entering class of 2012 enrolled having these college GPA's:

Enrollment Type 25th - 75th Percentile
Full-Time 3.33 - 3.69
Total 3.33 - 3.69

Admission Considerations

Very Important: Recommendations, Undergraduate GPA, Personal Essay

Admission Requirements

Required: Standardized Test Scores, Resume, Recommendations, Undergraduate GPA, Personal Essay

Optional: Interview, Extracurricular Activities, Work Experience, State Residency

Rankings

Rankings

The Princeton Review

#6 Toughest To Get Into

Outcomes

Outcomes

Bar Exam Results

Percent Reporting 74%
First Time Pass Rate 90%
Avg. Pass Rate In This State 81%

Campus Recruitment

Number of Employers Recruiting on Campus 200
First Year Recruitment Time Summer
Second Year Recruitment Time Summer

Employment

Percent Employed (9 Months After Graduation) 91%
Job Sector Number of Graduates Percent of Graduates
Firm Sized 2-10 28 14%
Firm Sized 11-25 8 4%
Firm Sized 26-50 7 4%
Firm Sized 51-100 5 2%
Firm Sized 101-250 8 4%
Firm Sized 251-500 9 4%
Firm Sized 501+ 25 12%
Business Industry 41 20%
Government 23 11%
Public Interest 7 3%
Federal Clerkship 13 6%
State Clerkship 14 7%
Academia 12 6%
Unemployed Number of Graduates Percent of Graduates
Unemployed, Not Seeking 5 2%
Unemployed, Seeking 28 11%
Pursuing Graduate Degree 10 4%

Top Employment Locations

State Percent Employed
NY 5%
DC 8%
NC 58%
International 0%

Famous Alumni

Well known alumni of University of North Carolina School of Law include:

  • Henry Frye - Chief Justice NC Sct
  • Sarah Parker - Chief Justice NC Sct
  • Julius Chambers - Civil Rights Attorney
  • Jim Delany - Big 10 Conference Commissioner

Associations & Memberships

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