Main Profile

At A Glance

University of Georgia School of Law

The Juris Doctor is conferred upon the successful completion of the three-year, full-time program of legal study at Georgia Law. On average, greater than 95 percent of the members of each entering class graduate. The J.D. graduate must earn a minimum of 88 semester credit hours, satisfy an advanced writing requirement, and complete the required course in Legal Profession and a skills-based curricular offering. Because obtaining a legal education is a challenging and time-consuming task, you should be prepared to devote substantially all working hours during the academic year to the study of law. The University of Georgia does not offer a part-time law program. Therefore, first-year students are urged to refrain from taking jobs when classes are in session, and no law student is allowed to work in a paid position that requires more than 20 hours per week during the academic year.

GPA:  LSAT: 

Contact

University of Georgia School of Law's Full Profile

Program At a Glance

Total Program Enrollment 663
Incoming LSAT Scores (25th-75th Percentile) 158 - 165
Incoming GPA (25th-75th Percentile) 3.33 - 3.82
Bar Exam First Time Pass Rate 92.51%
Percent Employed (9 Months After Graduation) 87.0%
In State Tuition $18,058
Out of State Tuition $35,480

Overview

Overview

About University of Georgia School of Law

The Juris Doctor is conferred upon the successful completion of the three-year, full-time program of legal study at Georgia Law. On average, greater than 95 percent of the members of each entering class graduate. The J.D. graduate must earn a minimum of 88 semester credit hours, satisfy an advanced writing requirement, and complete the required course in Legal Profession and a skills-based curricular offering. Because obtaining a legal education is a challenging and time-consuming task, you should be prepared to devote substantially all working hours during the academic year to the study of law. The University of Georgia does not offer a part-time law program. Therefore, first-year students are urged to refrain from taking jobs when classes are in session, and no law student is allowed to work in a paid position that requires more than 20 hours per week during the academic year.

Reviews

At the University of Georgia Law, students rave about the education they receive for a “bargain price.” Non-resident students may apply for in-state rates after the first year, and many out-of-state residents receive scholarships for their first year, which waive the tuition difference. That’s not to mention the school’s “great academic reputation” and position as a “feeder to the most prominent city in the South.” “It is really nice to be able to afford a JD from a reputable school and not be faced with the ‘golden handcuffs,’” says a student not looking to work at a firm. All in all, “The professors, the people, the cur­riculum, and the facilities contribute to an overall competitive and comprehensive pro­gram that still embodies southern hospitality.”The “stellar” teachers at Georgia Law are “compassionate, while still demanding excel­lence,” and it’s “very easy to meet with professors and discuss things unrelated to class,” as well as many student groups that allow for diverse ideas and discussions among students. “They genuinely care about us as individuals and have never been too busy to assist,” says a student. Though students “are definitely left to figure things out on our own in many respects” (“Communication about how to get grades, etc., are somewhat lacking.”), the school “provides a wide range of clinical opportunities for its students,” as well as its nationally recognized moot court and mock trial programs and three major journals. It also offers study and work abroad programs to help reinforce its focus on global issues, and concurrent enrollment with the university’s other programs is an option. There’s a wide variety of courses from which students can choose their electives, and the school has a unique approach to grading in the “intense” first year. Students don’t receive grades for the first semester (with the exception of criminal law and civil proce­dure), and at the end of 1L, fall semester performance counts toward the final grade, but it’s weighted significantly less than spring exam scores. The school wants students to focus on their studies and discourages 1Ls from taking jobs during the first year of law school. Georgia Law has one of the largest law libraries in the nation—students love its “huge, picturesque windows and accommodating seating and tables”—and it’s embarking on a renovation and expansion that will only improve the quality of life. Classroom facilities are “also great,” and the school produces an enthusiastic alumni base that helps during interview season. Still, many students do wish that more job opportunities outside of Georgia found their way to the UGA Law campus.

- The Princeton Review

Academics

Academics

Degree Programs Offered

Graduates Last Year: 234

Description: A program that prepares individuals for the independent professional practice of law, for taking state and national bar examinations, and for advanced research in jurisprudence. Includes instruction in the theory and practice of the legal system, including the statutory, administrative, and judicial components of civil and criminal law.

Job Opportunities:

Lawyers
Represent clients in criminal and civil litigation and other legal proceedings, draw up legal documents, or manage or advise clients on legal transactions. May specialize in a single area or may practice broadly in many areas of law.
Judicial Law Clerks
Assist judges in court or by conducting research or preparing legal documents.
Administrative Law Judges, Adjudicators, and Hearing Officers
Conduct hearings to recommend or make decisions on claims concerning government programs or other government-related matters. Determine liability, sanctions, or penalties, or recommend the acceptance or rejection of claims or settlements.
Arbitrators, Mediators, and Conciliators
Facilitate negotiation and conflict resolution through dialogue. Resolve conflicts outside of the court system by mutual consent of parties involved.
Judges, Magistrate Judges, and Magistrates
Arbitrate, advise, adjudicate, or administer justice in a court of law. May sentence defendant in criminal cases according to government statutes or sentencing guidelines. May determine liability of defendant in civil cases. May perform wedding ceremonies.
Law Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in law. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.

Joint Degree Programs Offered

JD/Master of Business Administration (4 years); JD/Master of Historic Preservation (4 years); JD/Master of Public Administration (4 years); JD/Master of Social Work (4 years); JD/Master of Education in Sports Studies (4 years); JD/M.A., various fields (varies); JD/Ph.D., various fields (varies).

Specialty Law Programs

  • Civil Procedure
  • Commercial
  • Constitutional
  • Corporation Securities
  • Criminal
  • Environmental
  • Government Services
  • Human Rights
  • International
  • Labor
  • Legal History
  • Legal Philosophy
  • Property
  • Taxation
  • Intellectual Property

Faculty Information

Total Faculty 72
Full-Time Faculty 51
Deans, Librarians, and Others Who Teach 8
Part-Time Faculty 13
Faculty Gender 58% Male
41% Female
Student Teacher Ratio 11 : 1

Accreditation

Accredited by American Bar Association

Student Body

Student Body
Gender Breakdown 56% Male
44% Female
Student Diversity
Percentage
White 73%
Multi-racial 0%
International 2%
Hispanic/Latino 2%
Ethnicity Unknown 6%
Black or African American 13%
Asian 3%
American Indian or Alaska Native 1%

Finance

Finance

Sticker Price

In-State

On-Campus Off-Campus
Stated Tuition $18,058 Same as On-Campus
Housing $15,266 N/A
Books N/A N/A
Total (before financial aid) $33,324 $18,058

Out-of-State

On-Campus Off-Campus
Stated Tuition $35,480 Same as On-Campus
Housing $15,266 N/A
Books N/A N/A
Total (before financial aid) $50,746 $35,480

Financial Aid

90% Graduate students receiving financial aid (loans and grants)

$28,930 Average financial aid amount

Admissions

Admissions

Application Information

Deadline for Regular Decision: April 1

Average Age Admitted: 23

Application Fee: $50

Incoming Class

University of Georgia School of Law's entering class of 2012 enrolled having these exam grades:

Exam Enrollment Type 25th - 75th Percentile
LSAT Full-Time 158 - 165
LSAT Total 158 - 165

University of Georgia School of Law's entering class of 2012 enrolled having these college GPA's:

Enrollment Type 25th - 75th Percentile
Full-Time 3.33 - 3.82
Total 3.33 - 3.82

Admission Considerations

Very Important: Recommendations, Undergraduate GPA, Personal Essay

Admission Requirements

Required: Personal Essay, Recommendations, Undergraduate GPA, Standardized Test Scores

Optional: Work Experience, Extracurricular Activities, Interview, State Residency

Rankings

Rankings

U.S. News & World Report

#51 National Liberal Arts
#55 National Liberal Arts Colleges High School Counselor Rankings

Outcomes

Outcomes

Bar Exam Results

Percent Reporting 96%
First Time Pass Rate 93%
Avg. Pass Rate In This State 85%

Employment

Percent Employed (9 Months After Graduation) 87%
Average Starting Salary $55,000
Job Sector Number of Graduates Percent of Graduates
Firm Sized 2-10 33 17%
Firm Sized 11-25 10 5%
Firm Sized 26-50 8 5%
Firm Sized 51-100 11 6%
Firm Sized 101-250 5 3%
Firm Sized 251-500 7 4%
Firm Sized 501+ 27 14%
Business Industry 18 9%
Government 24 12%
Public Interest 11 6%
Federal Clerkship 17 9%
State Clerkship 14 7%
Academia 3 2%
Unemployed Number of Graduates Percent of Graduates
Unemployed, Not Seeking 3 1%
Unemployed, Seeking 21 9%
Pursuing Graduate Degree 5 2%

Top Employment Locations

State Percent Employed
SC 3%
DC 4%
GA 78%
International 1%

Associations & Memberships

Questions about University of Georgia School of Law

Want more info about University of Georgia School of Law? Get free advice from education experts and Noodle community members.

  • Answer

Ask a New Question