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The ADR Act of 1998: What it Means for the Courts (1999)

Federal Judicial Center The ADR Act of 1998: What it Means for the Courts While retaining a high degree of flexibility and discretion for individual courts, the Alternative Dispute Resolution Act of 1998 imposes a number of requirements, among them that each court authorize the use of at least one form of ADR for civil cases, including bankruptcy adversary proceedings; implement its own ADR program; and adopt local rules requiring litigants to consider using ADR. District Judges Gladys Kessler (D.D.C.) and James Rosenbaum (D. Minn.) discuss the essential elements of the Act and how courts can comply with its provisions.
Length: 56:06

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