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Questions and Answers on Follicular lymphoma from Fredrick Hagemeister, M.D.

Lymphoma is a cancer of the bodys lymphocytes, a type of white blood cell. After the cells become malignant (cancerous), they can become tumor masses that invade other organs. T cell lymphomas are relatively uncommon in the United States. They are more common in Asia. B-cell lymphomas are relatively common in the United States and Europe. They can occur in the young and the old, and, depending on their genetic makeup, can be fast- or slow-growing. The hallmark of follicular lymphoma is its slowly progressive nature. Few patients have symptoms until they visit their doctors with swollen lymph nodes. Though it usually is slow-growing, the disease can be tricky, finding ways to recur again and again. Fortunately, new drugs and targeted agents offer hope to patients. Answering questions about follicular lymphoma is Fredrick Hagemeister, M.D., professor in the Department of Lymphoma and Myeloma at M. D. Anderson.
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