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Songwriting: Composing Smooth Simple Melody Search Andrew for FREE lesson Handouts. This Video: August 16, 2011 | Search Videos by Title/Date. GO TO: Andrew Wasson of Creative Guitar Studio answers a viewers question... Q: I've been having a tough time trying to develop simple composed melodies over chord progressions. I'm basically a rock guitar ex-shredder guy who's now trying to slow down and create simple expressive lines in the instrumental pop/rock and jazz/R and B styles. The only thing is, I'm not having much luck. Could you please make a lesson covering a few concepts that work effectively when playing slower composed melodies? Thanks for the great YouTube channel you run, I'm learning a lot. - Isaac -- Grand Rapids, MI. A: Composing melodies that are simple, melodic and interpretive in a style like instrumental music requires a lyrical touch. To achieve this, you'll need notes that can linger and also suuround chord tones to really connect with the underlying harmony. Another important area happens to be the often over-looked area of rhythm. Strong and simple melodies tend to focus quite heavily upon recurring rhythmic threads in the music. In the video we'll have a look at a number of important tips to help create a nice balance when composing simple melodies in the instrumental style. The complete lesson article for this video will be available on the Creative Guitar Studio website shortly. Follow me on Twitter for lesson posting announcements: ____________________________________ The NEW Zazzle Products page: ____________________________________ Andrew's Official Q & A Guitar Blog Website: (the weekly Podcast is posted here) Andrew's "Video GuitarBlog" YouTube Channel: The Creative Guitar Studio Website: Follow Andrew on Blogspot: Follow on Twitter for new lesson announcements: MySpace: Facebook: _____________________________________
Length: 07:58


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