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Guitar Lesson: Using Octaves in Melodies & Solos

http://www.creativeguitarstudio.com/ Andrew Wasson of Creative Guitar Studio answers a viewers question... Q: There is a guitar soloing technique called Octaves that I know Santatna, Hendrix and Wes Montgomery have all used in their music. My problem is I cant seem to get Octaves to work in my own playing. Can you do a lesson about octaves? I would like to know the best shapes and a few ways that they can be used for playing basic melody, as well as, during improvised soloing work. Bryce Minneapolis, MN. U.S.A. A: Thanks for writing in. Octaves are a very cool technique that will really beef up the tone of a melody line, compared to only playing on a single-note. Once we add in an octave we not only generate a second note of the same tonal name but we get the added punch of two pitches on different diameter string sets of the guitar. Its really this thickening of the sound that sets the octave effect apart from practically any other interval combination we can establish on the neck. The complete lesson article for this video is available on the Creative Guitar Studio website. Follow the link below: http://www.creativeguitarstudio.com/lessons/technique/octaves_on_guitar.php ____________________________________ Andrew's Official Q & A Guitar Blog Website: http://www.andrewwasson.com Andrew's "Video GuitarBlog" YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/guitarblogupdate The Creative Guitar Studio Website: http://www.creativeguitarstudio.com/ Follow Andrew on Blogspot: http://creativeguitarstudio.blogspot.com/ Follow on Twitter for new lesson announcements: http://twitter.com/andrewwasson MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/andrewwasson Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Andrew-Wasson/76585035288 _____________________________________
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