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NASA | Arctic Sea Ice Shrinks to Yearly Minimum -- Sept. 9, 2011

On Sept. 9th, 2011, Arctic sea ice most likely hit its minimum extent for the year. On Sept. 20th, NASA's Cryosphere Program Manager, Tom Wagner, shared his perspectives on the ice with television audiences across the country. On the top of the world, a pulsing, shifting body of ice has profound effects on the weather and climate of the rest of the planet. Every winter as temperatures dip, sea ice freezes out of cold Arctic Ocean waters, and every summer the extent of that ice shrinks as warm ocean temperatures eat it away. Ice cover throughout the year can affect polar ecosystems, world-wide ocean currents, and even the heat budget of the Earth. During the last 30 years we've been monitoring the ice with satellites, there has been a consistent downward trend, with less and less ice making it through the summer. The thickness of that ice has also diminished. In 2011 Arctic sea ice extent was its second smallest on record, opening up the fabled Northwest Passages and setting the stage for more years like this in the future. In this video, NASA's Cryosphere Program Manager, Tom Wagner, shares his perspectives on the 2011 sea ice minimum.
Length: 03:46

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