Main Profile

At A Glance

Online Data Collection: 10,000 Times More Efficient than the KGB?

Complete Premium video at: http://fora.tv/conference/hsm_wif_2010 Andreas Weigend, former Chief Scientist for Amazon.com, discusses what he calls the "social data revolution." He explains that personal data collection is growing at such an exponential rate, that it's now 10,000 times more efficient than the KGB was 20 years ago. To view more highlights from the HSM World Innovation Forum 2010 series, visit http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=88C0567991E989D6 ----- The world's greatest thought leaders in the field convene at the World Innovation Forum to provide actionable insights into the central issues at the heart of innovation today -- Marketing, Web 2.0, Health Care, Social Media, Design, Technology, Education, Green. Former Chief Scientist at Amazon.com Andreas Weigend on marketing and web 2.0: Marketing in the web 2.0: Beyond cutting costs and optimizing business processes What are the implications for new business models products and services? A world of abundance: Making the most of quantitative and qualitative data Social networks and the new uses of data: The power of social recommendations and behavioral targeting Lessons from the inside: What we can learn from Amazon Andreas Weigend, Amazon.com's Chief Scientist until January 2004, is a leading behavioral marketing expert. His career as a scientist, data strategist and quantitative methods innovator has enabled him to bridge the gap between industry and academia. As the Chief Scientist of Amazon.com, he developed data mining techniques including session-based marketing, and designed applications ranging from heuristic cross-selling to customer network and lifecycle analysis. Weigend currently teaches the graduate course Data Mining and Electronic Commerce at Stanford University.
Length: 03:47

Contact

Questions about Online Data Collection: 10,000 Times More Efficient than the KGB?

Want more info about Online Data Collection: 10,000 Times More Efficient than the KGB?? Get free advice from education experts and Noodle community members.

  • Answer

Ask a New Question