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Grammar of Romance - syntax of compound & passive sentences in Vulgar Latin & the Romance languages

The next in a series on the grammar of the Romance languages. This video introduces the structure of trickier sentences. I cover a lot, so please pause for time to read all of the examples. I divided Romance verbs into finite (contains person/number info) vs. non-finite. Basic compound sentences attach two finites with *quod 'that': *sapio quod cantas "I know that you sing". The verb after *quod is subjunctive if it's counterfactual: *volio quod cantes "I want that you sing". When the verbs have the same subject, the second verb is an infinitive: *volio cantare "I want to sing". Romance dropped the passive endings of Latin, so *est cantatu "it is sung" replaced older CANTATVR. The languages also get mileage out of reflexive constructions like *se cantat "it is sung" (literally "sings itself"). French uses *omo cantat - 'on chante' (formerly "man sings"), and Romansh has *unus cantat - 'ins chanta' "one sings". The Grammar of Romance has an associated URL (free) and book ($) with more explanations & examples: http://www.nativlang.com/romance-languages/ http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1475246633/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=nativlangu-20 Music: Kevin MacLeod
Length: 06:40

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