Main Profile

At A Glance

Grammar of Romance - object pronouns in Vulgar Latin & the Romance languages

The next video in a series about the basic grammar of the Romance languages. This one introduces the personal object pronouns. The video moves along quickly, so feel free to pause & rewatch as needed, especially if you wish to view all of the comparative examples. "Weak" object pronouns are used with verbs. There are two types - direct objects (like *me in *me vides 'you see me') and indirect objects (like *mi in *mi dices 'you say to me'). Formal/polite subjects have a corresponding set of object pronouns. For example, Italian, Spanish and Portuguese all use a formal third-person subject to address you politely: Italian 'Lei canta' "you sing". Likewise, all three languages use a third-person object pronoun to talk about you politely when you are the object of the verb: Italian 'gli canto' "I sing to you". The object is called "reflexive" when it's identical to the subject: *me vidio "I see myself". The third-person reflexive object is unique: *illos vident "they see them" versus *se vident "they see themselves". "Strong" object pronouns are used with prepositions like *ad 'to', *cun 'with' and *in 'in': Portuguese 'a mim', French '? moi', Italian 'a me', Romanian 'la mine' for "to me". "The Grammar of Romance" has an associated website (free) and book ($). They offer even more explanations and examples: http://www.nativlang.com/romance-languages/ http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1475246633/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=nativlangu-20 Music by Kevin MacLeod
Length: 07:11

Contact

Questions about Grammar of Romance - object pronouns in Vulgar Latin & the Romance languages

Want more info about Grammar of Romance - object pronouns in Vulgar Latin & the Romance languages? Get free advice from education experts and Noodle community members.

  • Answer

Ask a New Question