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Fact or Fiction Pt 2: The US Courts' Use of History to Shape Native Law Jurisprudence

Since the first court decision to articulate Native American law back in 1823, our nation's courts have repeatedly invoked historical "facts" as a basis for fashioning judicial doctrines that have been prejudicial and harmful to Native Americans. This important symposium will reveal that many of our modern Native law doctrines are based in fiction, not fact. Join us as we explore the historical foundations of key court decisions impacting Native Americans. Speakers include Stuart Banner, UCLA School of Law; Walter Echo-Hawk (Pawnee), Crowe & Dunlevy, Oklahoma; Mary Kathryn Nagle (Cherokee), Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan, New York; and Lindsay Robertson, University of Oklahoma College of Law. Kevin Gover (Pawnee), director of the Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian, will moderate. The symposium is cosponsored by the National Native American Bar Association and the Federal Bar Association Indian Law Section. October 7, 2011
Length: 02:01:37

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