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79 Great Kordofan Region · Sudan

We have selected 100 unique places on Earth that are projected to undergo profound changes within the next few generations. We based our selection of the 100 places on the 4th Assessment Report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). Simply by drawing attention to the beauty of these places, 100 Places to Remember Before they Disappear creates an argument to preserve them. The 100 Places we have chosen to highlight, and the people who live in them, are in serious danger because of rising sea levels, rising temperatures and extreme weather events triggered by climate change. Among ambassadors are Joss Stone, Desmond Tutu for more info visit http://www.100places.com - Great Kordofan Region · Sudan The Precious Glue of Sudan Sudan, the biggest country in Africa, is also the worlds largest single producer of gum arabic. A thick belt of hashab trees (Acacia senegal), from which the gum is extracted, stretches from one end of the country to the other, supporting small-scale farmers and the Sudanese economy as a whole. Essential to the mummification process in ancient Egypt, and used to preserve paintings since biblical times, gum arabic is still a treasured commodity. It is a natural emulsifier with the same properties as glue, yet edible by humans and highly soluble in water. In soft drinks it prevents the colour from separating and the sugar from precipitating, and it holds the ingredients in medicines together in the same way. In newspapers multiple layers of gum serve as a protective film that keeps the print consistent and permanent. Benefiting from major global demand, small-scale farmers tap the amber-coloured gum by cutting holes into the bark. The raw sap is then sent to Europe to be processed and sold. In the last decade, however, exports have declined dramatically, partly due to the ongoing humanitarian crisis in Darfur, which has damaged Sudans reputation and had a negative impact on all exports. Global climate change has also contributed to the decline in exports. During the last 50 years, lower than average rainfall, drought and rising temperatures have had a negative impact on the forests, affecting gum production and the lives of millions of Sudanese people. As well as being a vital source of income, the hashab trees improve the fertility of the soil and reduce wind erosion. With temperatures projected to rise and rainfall trends unclear, the prospects for the gum arabic forests are uncertain. Any further loss of forest and income would threaten livelihoods and escalate already existing conflicts in the region. The Precious Glue of Sudan Sudan, the biggest country in Africa, is also the worlds largest single producer of gum arabic. A thick belt of hashab trees (Acacia senegal), from which the gum is extracted, stretches from one end of the country to the other, supporting small-scale farmers and the Sudanese economy as a whole. Essential to the mummification process in ancient Egypt, and used to preserve paintings since biblical times, gum arabic is still a treasured commodity. It is a natural emulsifier with the same properties as glue, yet edible by humans and highly soluble in water. In soft drinks it prevents the colour from separating and the sugar from precipitating, and it holds the ingredients in medicines together in the same way. In newspapers multiple layers of gum serve as a protective film that keeps the print consistent and permanent. Benefiting from major global demand, small-scale farmers tap the amber-coloured gum by cutting holes into the bark. The raw sap is then sent to Europe to be processed and sold. In the last decade, however, exports have declined dramatically, partly due to the ongoing humanitarian crisis in Darfur, which has damaged Sudans reputation and had a negative impact on all exports. Global climate change has also contributed to the decline in exports. During the last 50 years, lower than average rainfall, drought and rising temperatures have had a negative impact on the forests, affecting gum production and the lives of millions of Sudanese people. As well as being a vital source of income, the hashab trees improve the fertility of the soil and reduce wind erosion. With temperatures projected to rise and rainfall trends unclear, the prospects for the gum arabic forests are uncertain. Any further loss of forest and income would threaten livelihoods and escalate already existing conflicts in the region.
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