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The Big Picture - A Debt is Honored

Transcript (PDF): CREATED BY Department of Defense. Department of the Army. Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff for Operations. U.S. Army Audiovisual Center. DATES: (ca. 1974 - 05/15/1984 ) CREATOR TYPE: Most Recent USE RESTRICTIONS STATUS: Restricted - Possibly USE RESTRICTIONS NOTE: Some or all of this material may be restricted by copyright or other intellectual property right restrictions. URL: NOTE: A DVD of this film can be ordered from our partner, A DVD of this film is ALSO available for viewing and copying free of charge in the NARA Research Room in the Motion Picture, Sound, and Video Records Section, National Archives at College Park, 8601 Adelphi Road, College Park, MD. SCOPE AND CONTENT NOTE: The original release sheet reads: Filmed in Philadelphia, this episode in THE BIG PICTURE series tells the story of an historic incident that took place in 1763 when the forerunners of Philadelphia's 111th Infantry Regiment (Pennsylvania National Guard) were besieged by Indians at Fort Pitt in the midst of the French and Indian War. They were rescued by the tough troops of Britain's Black Watch--the soldiers who, because of their kilts and ferocity, were nicknamed the "ladies from hell" in World War I. Since that time in 1763, the descendants of the 111th and the Black Watch Regiment have maintained a close and friendly association. Each year the 111th in Philadelphia reserves a vacant chair at the table during the annual ceremonial mess. The vacant chair is held in honor of the Black Watch Regiment. A 25-man camera crew from the Army Pictorial Center filmed the many activities that took place in conjunction with the ceremonial mess which was held at the Union League. Coverage was also given to the first professional football game to be played in the U.S. by two teams from across the border in Canada. FOR MORE INFORMATION:
Length: 02:00


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