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Tzo'kam perform "The Bone Game Song" at the 1998 Folklife Festival

Flora Wallace and her family--collectively known as Tzo'kam--perform "The Bone Game Song" at the 1998 Smithsonian Folklife Festival. Bone games are popular among American Indians across the northwestern United States of America, including the Salish peoples to which Tzo'kam belong. During the game, two teams compete to guess where players are hiding carved animal bones. The game is accompanied by exuberant singing, drumming, or rattles. Bone game songs are very lively and fast paced, and are sung with full voices. The players hiding the bones often gesture expressively in time with the music. In earlier times, it was usually men who competed, but nowadays women and youth participate, too. Playing with percussive accompaniment and animated gestures, Tzo'kam continues this tradition. To find more Native American music visit http://www.folkways.si.edu/searchresults.aspx?set=1&sPhrase=american+Indian&sType='phrase' To learn more about Smithsonian Folkways visit: http://www.folkways.si.edu To find out more about the Smithsonian Folklife Festival visit: http://festival.si.edu/ The content and comments posted here are subject to the Smithsonian Institution copyright and privacy policy (www.si.edu/copyright/). Smithsonian reserves the right in its sole discretion to remove any content at any time.
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