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Chemistry: The Concept of Equilibrium

http://www.mindbites.com/lesson/1292 for full video. http://www.mindbites.com/series/501 for a bundle of videos on Principles of Chemical Equilibrium. For an even broader bundle of videos that cover Principles of Chemical Equilibrium and Chemical Equilibrium, check out http://www.mindbites.com/series/500 . To search for topic-specific help in our library of 400+ video products for Chemistry, please refer to our Chemistry category at: http://www.mindbites.com/category/24-chemistry . To check out our full Chemistry video course, with 300+ videos included, refer to: http://www.mindbites.com/series/549-chemistry-full-course . Professor Harman explains the concept of equilibrium. In a dynamic equilibrium, though appearing static at the acroscopic level, the forward reaction equals the reverse reaction. To create this type of equilibrium, the system must be closed. This can occur in a chemical system, as well. In chemical equilibrium, the forward and reverse reactions are equal and the concentrations of products and reactants do not change. Professor Harman also explains how you can determine the direction of equilibrium mathematically. To do this, you can look at the partial pressures. As the pressures level out, the system reaches equilibrium. You can also look at the rates of the forward and reverse reactions. When the rates become equal, the system has reached equilibrium. Then, Professor Harman explains that if the equilibrium is disrupted, a new equilibrium will establish in which the overall ratios pf products and reactants are equal. These ratios help to determine the Equilibrium Constant, which reveals the direction of the overall balance of the chemical system. Taught by Professor Harman, this lesson was selected from a broader, comprehensive course, Chemistry. Dean Harman is a professor of chemistry at the University of Virginia, where he has been honored with several teaching awards. He heads Harman Research Group, which specializes in the novel organic transformations made possible by electron-rich metal centers such as Os(II), RE(I), AND W(0). He holds a Ph.D. from Stanford University. Founded in 1997, Thinkwell has succeeded in creating "next-generation" textbooks that help students learn and teachers teach. Capitalizing on the power of new technology, Thinkwell products prepare students more effectively for their coursework than any printed textbook can. Thinkwell has assembled a group of talented industry professionals who have shaped the company into the leading provider of technology-based textbooks. For more information about Thinkwell, please visit www.thinkwell.com.
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