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Calculus: Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, Part II

http://www.mindbites.com/series/154 for a bundle of videos on the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. For an even broader bundle of videos that cover the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus and Integration Basics, check out http://www.mindbites.com/series/155 . To search for topic-specific help in our library of 600+ video products for Calculus, please refer to our Calculus category at: http://www.mindbites.com/category/23-calculus . To check out our full Calculus video course, with 250+ videos included, refer to: http://www.mindbites.com/series/227-calculus . Or, for access to this single video, go to: http://www.mindbites.com/lesson/844-calculus-fundamental-theorem-of-calculus-part-ii/. The Second part of the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus provides the link between velocity and area. It states that the sum of the area under the curve between two points (A and B) is equal to the difference of the antiderivatives of A and B. Thus, to find the area under a curve between two points, you will take the difference of the derivatives calculated at the end points, A and B. This theorem enables you to evaluate definite integrals by finding the area between the function described and the X axis. The lesson will also cover proper notation that shoud be used to denote what you're evaluating over which interval. You will also work problems that involve trigonometric functions (like finding the area under a portion of the sine curve or cosine curve) This lesson explains the second half of the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. To see the fist half of the explanation, check out: http://www.mindbites.com/lesson/843 Taught by Professor Edward Burger, this lesson was selected from a broader, comprehensive Calculus course.
Length: 02:41

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