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GMAT Prep - Math - Algebra - Slope of a Line by Knewton

Go to http://www.knewton.com/gmat/ for hundreds of GMAT math and verbal concepts, thousands of practice problems and much more. Knewton GMAT is a GMAT prep course that redefines everything you thought you knew about online learning. The slope of a line tells us two things about that line. It tells us whether it's steep or shallow and whether it runs up to the right or down to the right. Informally, the formula for slope is described as rise over run. Formally, we say that slope equals the change of the y value over each change in x. Every time a line goes one unit to the right, how many units does it move up or down? Let's take a look at an example for calculating slope. We need to calculate the change in y value and the change in x value between the two points, (0, -1) and (4, 1). Notice that there is a difference of two in the y values and a difference of 4 in the x values. Using the formula, the change in y over the change in x is 2 over 4, which equals ?. Let's take a look at different kinds of slopes. Lines with positive slope run up to the right. Lines with negative slope run down to the right. Lines with zero slope are horizontal. Lines with undefined slope are vertical. Lines that make a 45 degree angle through the x and y axis and have a positive slope have a slope of 1. Lines that are steeper have a slope greater than 1. Lines that are less steep have a slope between 0 and 1. Lines that have a negative slope and make a 45 degree angle through the x and y axis have a slope of -1. Lines that are steeper have a slope less than -1, such as -2. Lines that are less steep have a slope between -1 and 0, such as -1/2. Subscribe to this channel for tips, explanations, and Q&A about the GMAT and getting your MBA.
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