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Physics: Vector components (35)

Trigonometry for physics: How to break ("resolve") an overall vector into components; and how to determine the magnitude and direction of an overall vector from its components. These videos are offered on a "pay what you like" basis. You can pay for the use of the videos at my website: http://www.freelance-teacher.com/videos.htm For a list of all the available video series, arranged in suggested viewing order, go to my website. For a playlist containing all the videos in this series, click here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nkQ17qxGdro&feature=PlayList&p=0F25651EF232517B&index=0&playnext=1 (1) Intro--why it's useful to break vectors into components (2) Intro continued (3) Intro continued (4) Intro concluded (5) Right triangles. "Hypoteneuse", "adjacent", "opposite" (6) "Hypoteneuse", "adjacent", "opposite", continued (7) Sin, cos, tan, and "SOH CAH TOA" (8) Continued (9) Concluded (10) HOW TO USE TRIGONOMETRY WHEN YOU'RE GIVEN ONE ANGLE AND ONE SIDE: an example (11) The example continued (12) The example concluded (13) Another example (14) Another example (15) Two more examples (16) Another example (17) The example concluded. Another example (18) Another example (19) Another example--no numbers (20) The example concluded. Another example with no numbers (21) HOW TO USE TRIGONOMETRY WHEN YOU'RE GIVEN TWO SIDES: an example (22) The example concluded (23) Another example (24) Another example (25) Another example (26) Another example (27) Another example (28) The example concluded (29) Another example (30) Another example (31) Another example (32) The example concluded. Another example (33) Another example--no numbers (34) Another example--no numbers (35) HOW TO BREAK AN OVERALL VECTOR INTO COMPONENTS. How to draw the components of an overall vector (36) Signed components versus component magnitudes. Use a dot to indicate the magnitude of a component (37) More examples for drawing components, and distinguishing between signed components and component magnitudes by using a dot (38) Drawing components, continued (39) Different positive directions (40) How to break an overall vector into components--an example (41) The example concluded (42) Another example (43) Another example (44) Another example (45) Another example (46) Another example (47) Another example (48) Another example, with different positive directions (49) Another example (50) Another example (51) How to break an overall vector into components--horizontal and vertical overall vectors (52) Horizontal & vertical vectors continued (53) How to break an overall vector into components--an example with no numbers (54) Two more examples (55) Two more examples (56) Given one component and an angle: an example (57) Another example (58) Another example (59) Another example (60) How to break an overall vector into components using nonhorizontal and nonvertical axes: an example (61) The example concluded (62) Another example (63) Another example (64) Another example (65) Examples with vectors parallel to the axes (66) How to break an overall vector into components using nonhorizontal and nonvertical axes: an example with no numbers (67) Another example (68) Another example (69) Another example (70) HOW TO DETERMINE THE MAGNITUDE AND DIRECTION OF THE OVERALL VECTOR FROM ITS COMPONENTS. The direction of the overall vector is indicated by an angle (not by a sign) (71) The direction of the overall vector is indicated by an angle, continued (72) How to determine the magnitude and direction of the overall vector from its components: an example (73) The example concluded (74) Another example (75) Another example (76) Another example (77) Another example (78) More examples: vectors with only one component (79) Another example--no numbers (80) Another example--non-horizontal, non-vertical axes (81) Another example (82) Another example (83) Conclusion: How breaking vectors into components is useful for solving physics problems--an example of using components to add vectors (84) Conclusion: The example continued (85) Conclusion: The example continued (86) Conclusion: The example concluded (87) Conclusion: Another example (88) Conclusion: The example continued (89) Conclusion: The example concluded tags: education college student university exam test educational study campus school
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