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Of Mice and Men EXTRA CREDIT! -- John Steinbeck's "Of Mice and Men" ... from 60second Recap™

[ Sound like a genius ... in 60 seconds.? www.60secondrecap.com ] John Steinbeck clipped the title, "Of Mice and Men," from a passage in the 18th-century poem, "To A Mouse. On Turning Her Up In Her Nest With The Plough" by Scottish poet Robert Burns. Burns, a farmer, wrote "To A Mouse" after he'd disturbed a mouse's hideaway while plowing his field in November of 1785. Here's the passage, from the poem's seventh stanza, in the standard English version: But Mouse, you are not alone, / In proving foresight may be vain: / The best laid schemes of mice and men / Go often askew, / And leaves us nothing but grief and pain, / For promised joy! If you're a purist, here's the same poem's seventh stanza, in Robert Burns original: But, Mousie, thou art no thy lane, / In proving foresight may be vain; / The best-laid schemes o' mice an 'men / Gang aft agley, / An'lea'e us nought but grief an' pain, / For promis'd joy!
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