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How to Avoid Supporting Child Labor

Watch more Political Change videos: http://www.howcast.com/guides/388-Political-Change Subscribe to Howcast's YouTube Channel - http://howc.st/uLaHRS Avoid supporting child labor by learning how to buy the right products. Howcast uploads the highest quality how-to videos daily! Be sure to check out our playlists for guides that interest you: http://howc.st/ytmainplaylists Subscribe to Howcast's other YouTube Channels: Howcast Health Channel - http://howc.st/HOE3aY Howcast Video Games Channel - http://howc.st/tYKKrk Howcast Tech Channel - http://howc.st/rx9FwR Howcast Food Channel - http://howc.st/umBoJX Howcast Arts & Recreation Channel - http://howc.st/vmB86i Howcast Sports & Fitness Channel - http://howc.st/vKjUjm Howcast Personal Care & Style Channel - http://howc.st/vbbNt3 Howcast empowers people with engaging, useful how-to information wherever, whenever they need to know how. Emphasizing high-quality instructional videos, Howcast brings you experts who provide accurate information in easy-to-follow tutorials on everything from makeup, hairstyling, nail art design, and soccer to parkour, skateboarding, dancing, kissing, and much, much more. Step 1: Go to the Department of Labor website Go to the Department of Labor (DOL) site for child labor's legal definition. It includes work by persons 15 and under, and certain jobs by persons under 18. Step 2: Visit the Immigration and Customs Enforcement site Go to the Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) website. Read the Forced Child Labor Advisory to learn about federal laws against child labor. Step 3: Learn about types of goods made with child labor Learn about types of goods commonly made with child labor. Read the DOL's "List of Goods Produced by Child Labor or Forced Labor." Tip Common items made with child labor include hand-knotted rugs, apparel, footwear, furniture, glassware, bricks, leather goods, and gemstones. Step 4: Check for anti-child labor product labels Check for anti-child labor product labels such as Rugmark and Goodweave labels in rugs, as well as "union made" labels in many other products. Tip GreenAmerica.org and UniteHere.org offer lists of manufacturers of union-made apparel and other goods. Step 5: Find the registered identification number Find the registered identification number (RN) on labels. Check a product's origin by entering its RN into the Federal Trade Commission's (FTC) database. Step 6: Support anti-child labor causes Support anti-child labor causes. Go to the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) website for their list of child rights' support organizations. Now you know that the products you buy aren't made by exploited children. Did You Know? The UN's International Labor Organization (ILO) estimated the worldwide child laborer population at over 215 million in 2008.
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