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How To Know When To Get Which Vaccines For Your Child

Watch more Children's Health & Safety videos: http://www.howcast.com/guides/423-Childrens-Health-and-Safety Subscribe to Howcast's YouTube Channel - http://howc.st/uLaHRS Learn how to know when to get which vaccines for your child with the help of these guidelines. Howcast uploads the highest quality how-to videos daily! Be sure to check out our playlists for guides that interest you: http://howc.st/ytmainplaylists Subscribe to Howcast's other YouTube Channels: Howcast Health Channel - http://howc.st/HOE3aY Howcast Video Games Channel - http://howc.st/tYKKrk Howcast Tech Channel - http://howc.st/rx9FwR Howcast Food Channel - http://howc.st/umBoJX Howcast Arts & Recreation Channel - http://howc.st/vmB86i Howcast Sports & Fitness Channel - http://howc.st/vKjUjm Howcast Personal Care & Style Channel - http://howc.st/vbbNt3 Howcast empowers people with engaging, useful how-to information wherever, whenever they need to know how. Emphasizing high-quality instructional videos, Howcast brings you experts who provide accurate information in easy-to-follow tutorials on everything from makeup, hairstyling, nail art design, and soccer to parkour, skateboarding, dancing, kissing, and much, much more. Step 1: Protect against Hepatitis B Have your pediatrician vaccinate your infant against Hepatitis B before they turn two months old. Step 2: Start a series of vaccinations At two months, take them for the IPV, PCV, Hib, DTaP and Rotavirus vaccines. Repeat all five inoculations at four months and again at six months. Repeat the Hepatitis B vaccine between their sixth and 18th month. Tip IPV protects against polio; PCV guards against bacteria that cause pneumonia; Hib helps prevent meningitis and other serious illnesses; DTaP offers protection against diphtheria, tetanus, and whooping cough; and Rotavirus vaccine guards against severe viral gastroenteritis. Step 3: Immunize them against the flu If they're at least six months old, make sure your baby gets a flu shot, including an inoculation against any specific flu epidemics, like H1N1. For this first flu vaccination, they'll need two shots, spaced one month apart. Step 4: Get the first birthday shots When your child turns one, take them for the MMR shot, which protects them from measles, mumps, and rubella; the varicella vaccine, which guards against chickenpox; and the first of two doses of the Hepatitis A vaccine. At age 15 months, give them the final doses of Hib and PCV. Tip Doctors do not advise exposing a child to illnesses intentionally as a way to build their immunity. Step 5: Get the final DTaP shot Get them their fourth DTaP and final Hepatitis A shots by the time they're 18 months old. Step 6: Get three more If needed, between their second and sixth birthdays, take them for the PPSV against pneumonia and MCV4 vaccines against meningitis. Step 7: And another four... Between your child's fourth and sixth birthdays, get your child their final doses of DTaP, IPV, MMR, and varicella vaccines. Step 8: Get a booster shot When your child is 11 or 12, get them a DTaP booster shot. And consider getting your daughter vaccinated against HPV, a virus that causes most cervical cancers. Girls as young as nine may receive this vaccine. Did You Know? Englishman Edward Jenner, who created the first vaccine from cow pus in 1796, coined the term vaccination, which comes from the Latin word for cow.
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