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University of Massachusetts - Dartmouth Charlton College of Business Part Time MBA

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University of Massachusetts - Dartmouth Charlton College of Business Part Time MBA's Full Profile

Program at a Glance

Program Type Part Time

Program Information

Degrees Awarded: MBA, Part Time.

Rankings

Rankings

School Rankings

The Princeton Review

N/A Best Business Schools (Northeast)

Admissions

Admissions

Admission Considerations

Very Important: Undergraduate GPA, Standardized Test Scores

Important: Recommendations, Personal Essay

Admission Requirements

Required: Extracurricular Activities, Undergraduate GPA, Personal Essay, Standardized Test Scores, Work Experience, Recommendations

Admission Information

Applicants to the UMD MBA program must submit the following materials to the Admissions Committee: official transcripts from all post-secondary academic institutions attended (transcripts from institutions outside the US must be translated when not in English and evaluated by a Credit Evaluation service where the grading system deviates from the st...Applicants to the UMD MBA program must submit the following materials to the Admissions Committee: official transcripts from all post-secondary academic institutions attended (transcripts from institutions outside the US must be translated when not in English and evaluated by a Credit Evaluation service where the grading system deviates from the standard American four-point system); an official GMAT score report; two letters of recommendation, preferably one reflecting academic ability and one reflecting professional experience; a personal essay; and a current resume. International applicants must submit all the above plus an official score report for the TOEFL (minimum score 533 paper-based test, 200 computer-based test) and visa-related paperwork. Admissions are processed on a rolling basis, with decisions typically coming with a month after the completed application is received. International applicants must apply by March 1 for fall entry and by October 1 for spring entry.

The Princeton Review

School Information

School Information

The following section features data representative of the entire business school, and numbers here are not necessarily reflective of the specific program.

Students and Faculty

Total Graduate Students 250
Total Full-Time Faculty 44
Full-Time Faculty 100%

Student Life

The business school facility on UMD’s main campus is of recent vintage; the ultramod­ern building, funded by a three million dollar grant from the Earle P. Charlton Family Trust, opened in 2004. Students speak highly of the main campus. They are less enthusi­astic about the Fall River site, which one MBA complains “has broken windows” and “is in a scary area.” Students describe the UMD MBA program as “commuter-based,” with students’ involvement “mostly limited to evening courses, with little interaction on campus dur­ing the day unless attending a special lecture.” “There’s no mandatory participation” in extracurricular activities, “which is good for me,” a typical student offers. That’s because most here “are working full time and do not have time to get involved in other things outside of class.” The student body here “is a mixture of students that have just graduated from college and others who are working and raising a family.” One reports, “Some are young—in their twenties—but there is a good mix of twenties, thirties, and forties. I’m 52 but feel comfortable in the environment.” The program is “internationally diverse,” with “peo­ple from all around the world. It is much more diverse than I would have expected,” a locally based student observes. “The international students are extremely friendly and bright. I enjoy working with them on projects,” one student notes.

Career

The MBA program at UMD utilizes the university’s Career Resource Center, which serves all undergraduates, graduate students, and alumni. The office provides a battery of career services, including workshops in resume-writing, interviewing, and salary negotiation; online job and resume listings; and on-campus recruiting events, including job fairs. Efforts here are primarily directed toward the undergraduate population. One MBA explains, “The majority of MBA students are usually using the MBA program to advance in their current occupation, with many large local corporations paying their tuition. The CRC is available and encouraged to be utilized for students seeking employ­ment after graduation.” Some students are less than satisfied with the situation; “They need to build their network of companies up badly. In so doing, they need to get more companies to come on campus and recruit,” one such student writes.

The Princeton Review

Students Say

The University of Massachusetts Dartmouth’s Charlton College of Business goes the extra mile to make its MBA program as convenient as possible. The student body, large­ly made up of busy young professionals, appreciates the effort. Three locations (the main campus in North Dartmouth, Fall River, and Cape Cod Community College) make it eas­ier for students to attend classes; “the ability to take online/blended courses” means they can sometimes skip the classroom entirely. An accommodating curriculum also helps; as one student explains, “I love the flexibility in the program. I can choose my classes in any order. Although it will be a four-year period before I finish in total, the slower pace is flexible and the option to take one course at a time is the only way I could have done it.” Cost is also a factor; students declare the UMD MBA “the least expensive AACSB-accredited business program in the area.” Students also praise “a stellar international core of professors with a wide range of professional and academic experience,” noting their instructors’ “focus on group work and presentations,” which they regard as “very realistic in the business world.” They’re less bullish on the administration, describing it as “disjointed.” “The administration needs to work more diligently at ironing out some of the bureaucracy in the system,” one student explains. “On more than one occasion, I have received multiple answers to the same question, depending on who I speak with.”Students also note “there is sometimes trouble with the offerings in certain concentra­tions.” Class availability sometimes diminishes the convenience of the program; students wish the school would “rotate the elective course offerings and have courses available for all concentrations that are offered” in order to mitigate the problem. Even so, students’ opinion of the program as a whole is favorable; one writes, “The overall academic expe­rience is challenging and engaging, [leaving me] very optimistic about potential for more success after graduation.”

The Princeton Review

Student Services

  • Campus Wide Network
  • Centers Of Research:

    Product Management, Supply Chain Management

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