Main Profile

At A Glance

University of South Carolina, Moore School of Business Part Time MBA

The Darla Moore School of Business is among the highest-ranked business schools in the world for international business education and research. Founded in 1919, the school has a history of innovative educational leadership, blending academic preparation with real-world experience through internships, study-abroad programs and entrepreneurism. The Moore School offers undergraduate, masters and doctoral degrees, as well as distinctive executive education programs. In 1998, the school was named for South Carolina native and financier Darla Moore, the first major university business school to be named after a woman.

GMAT: 

Contact

University of South Carolina, Moore School of Business Part Time MBA's Full Profile

Program at a Glance

Program Type Part Time

Program Information

University of South Carolina Moore School of Business Says

The Darla Moore School of Business is among the highest-ranked business schools in the world for international business education and research. Founded in 1919, the school has a history of innovative educational leadership, blending academic preparation with real-world experience through internships, study-abroad programs and entrepreneurism. The Moore School offers undergraduate, masters and doctoral degrees, as well as distinctive executive education programs. In 1998, the school was named for South Carolina native and financier Darla Moore, the first major university business school to be named after a woman.

Specializations Offered: International Business
Degrees Awarded: MBA, Professional.

Latest Tweet

Rankings

Rankings

Program Rankings

Bloomberg

#78 Businessweek Part Time MBA Programs

School Rankings

The Princeton Review

N/A Best Business Schools (Southeast)

Admissions

Admissions

Admission Considerations

Very Important: Recommendations, Undergraduate GPA, Personal Essay, Standardized Test Scores

Admission Requirements

Required: Work Experience, Recommendations, Extracurricular Activities, Undergraduate GPA, Personal Essay, Standardized Test Scores

Admission Information

Applicants must submit an application, an application fee, official transcripts of post-secondary academic work, personal essays, letters of recommendation, and an official GMAT score report. International students must also submit TOEFL or IELTS scores unless they are graduates of an American college or university. Strong preference is shown for a...Applicants must submit an application, an application fee, official transcripts of post-secondary academic work, personal essays, letters of recommendation, and an official GMAT score report. International students must also submit TOEFL or IELTS scores unless they are graduates of an American college or university. Strong preference is shown for applicants with at least two years of work experience.

The Princeton Review

Important Dates

Round 1
July

15

Deadline
August

21

Start

School Information

School Information

The following section features data representative of the entire business school, and numbers here are not necessarily reflective of the specific program.

Students and Faculty

Percent International Students 16%
Total Full-Time Faculty 83
Full-Time Faculty 100%

Student Life

The city of Columbia “is small but the student population makes going out fun” and “football is king.” Despite its “good bar scene and nightlife,” many of the students are “too busy during the core to enjoy the Columbia area. During your second year you have more of a chance, but it is a challenge to become involved in the community outside of the business school.” The school campus provides “a lot of social and cultural activities” and has “everything from the normal Finance Club to Net Impact and even a Wine Society. We organize plenty of intramural teams and usually open them up to most peo­ple in the class.” The school attracts “a diverse set of students from Peace Corps volunteers to Fortune 500 company employees,” to “Mormons with families” who all form a “very close-knit com­munity.” One student offers the more general observation that “half the students are more conservative and half are more liberal.” While coming from a diverse set of back­grounds and experiences, “all are interested in new adventures and experiences particu­larly those having to do with learning aspects of other cultures and how their business practices differ from U.S. standards.” “Overall, everyone is friendly and the atmosphere was one more of cooperation than competition.”

Career

The majority of students surveyed expressed the need to improve the Office of Career Management (OCM) which they suggested should “spend less time ‘coaching’ students and more time focusing on building relationships with employers” as well as “reach out to a more diverse company base including ones from a wider geographic range.” They also point out that “the highly-touted internship experience has suffered in recent years—the result of a failure to maintain relationships with companies (specifically in Latin America).” Students realize that not all of the blame falls on the OCM and acknowl­edge that “classes are small and our alumni network is small as a result. We attract some Fortune 500 companies who recruit on campus, but because there aren’t as many of us out there in leadership, sometimes it is harder for us to get our foot in the door with these companies and during the recession we were one of the first schools cut from recruiting trips as a result.” One of the more optimistic students has hopes for a brighter future and observes, “The Office of Career Management has partnered this year with a new exter­nal company and I believe they are doing a good job at providing students with place­ment services in a difficult hiring environment.”

The Princeton Review

About

Moore School of Business is known for its expertise and experience in international business. Top-ranked in national and international surveys, Moore School's undergraduate and graduate programs offer students opportunities to learn and work in a global business environment. Moore School's International MBA has been the top-ranked international business program at a U.S. public university since 1989, according to U.S. News & World Report. The Wall Street Journal ranks the Moore School seventh in the world for international business. The Financial Times MBA 2007 report ranks the Moore School first among all schools worldwide on "international experience." Moore is the only U.S. school ranked in the top ten for "international experience" by its alumni.The University of South Carolina's international business faculty has been rated #1 in research productivity by the Journal of International Business Studies. Many other programs and departments, such as entrepreneurship, insurance, and management science, also receive high marks. The Moore School of Business is accredited by AACSB International—The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business. In 1998, the university named its business school after South Carolina native and New York businesswoman Darla Moore, becoming the first comprehensive university to name its business school after a woman.

The Princeton Review

Students Say

Widely considered “one of the top institutions to study international business,” the Darla Moore School of Business at University of South Carolina offers an “alternative program to traditional business school” through its flagship international MBA (IMBA) program (although it does offer a professional MBA as well). The IMBA program exposes Moore’s students to a combination of “international work experience, education, and opportuni­ty to learn a new language while completing [an] MBA.” The program’s required core classes make lead to “well-rounded” students. In the IMBA program, “the first seven months are spent doing a year’s worth of core classes. Students are very tightly woven to provide each other academic, mental, and social support. The next four (or 12) months are spent overseas learning another language…then a four to seven-month internship, internationally or domestically, followed by a year of electives (in Columbia or abroad).”Supporting the unique structure of the program are the school’s “extremely talented” and “stellar” professors who “truly bring a wealth of international experience into the classroom.” These professors “teach worldwide and use cases, simulations, and other sit­uations to help us get a better understanding of how our decisions interact instead of just reading text.” They make “the most abstract material understandable.” As a result, stu­dents develop “a deep understanding of business fundamentals.” Particularly notewor­thy is the Global Supply Chain and Operations Management department which “pre­pares students to manage supply chains in a global environment, and provides students with operations management knowledge and practical training that puts them at the same level [as] engineers currently working at Fortune 500 companies.” While generally pleased with the quality of their professors, students are a bit more crit­ical of the business school’s administration which “is new and has some kinks to work out.” On a more positive note, students feel that the administration is “open to working with the students to improve the school community, which makes up for a lack of organ­ization and gives students a chance to gain valuable leadership skills.” One recent devel­opment that is generating a lot of excitement among the students is the new “green” “multimillion dollar business school building” which was designed with “input from everyone,” including “undergrads, master’s [students], PhD [students], [and] staff” and which all hope will “bring unbelievable opportunities for future students.”

The Princeton Review

Academic

The Moore School is best known for its International Master of Business Administration (IMBA) degree with two program options: the Language Track and the Global Track.

Regardless of the option chosen, all students study the same internationalized core of course work. The core courses emphasize the global aspects of the various functional areas, consistent with the program’s mission to provide students with an expertise in the international dimensions of business.

The Princeton Review

Second Year Curriculum

Concentration Areas: - Finance - Marketing - Supply Chain and Operations Manaegment - Information Systems - Human Resources - Economic Development - Global Management - Small Enterprise

The Princeton Review

First Year Curriculum

Core curriculum: - Globalization and Corporate Responsiblity - Global Entrepreneurship - Financial Accounting in the Global Environment - Global Stategic Management - Decision Analysis - Global Economics - Management Accounting in the Global Environment - Global Leadership and Ethics - Global Finance - Global Marketing Management - International Management - Operations Management - Information Systems

The Princeton Review

Student Services

  • Campus Wide Network
  • Centers Of Research:

    Daniel-Mickel Center (executive education), Division of Research, Center for International Business Education and Research, Faber Center for Entrepreneurship, Center for Process Research in Information Systems, Services, and Manufacturing (PRISM), and the Center for Business Communication

  • International Student Support Groups:

    International Programs Office of USC supports our programs and students with specific resources and counseling.

  • Lesbian Bisexual Transgender Support Groups:

    Through the University of South Carolina Division of Student Affairs programming office.

  • Minority Support Groups:

    Through the University of South Carolina Division of Student Affairs programming office.

  • Peer Tutoring Programs:

    All of our graduste programs promote tam support throughout the programs of study

  • Research Facilities:

    Daniel-Mickel Center (executive education), Division of Research, Center for International Business Education and Research, Faber Center for Entrepreneurship, Center for Process Research in Information Systems, Services, and Manufacturing (PRISM), and the Center for Business Communication

  • Study Abroad:

    Australia: Queensland University of Technology Austria: Wirtschaftsuniversitat Wien Belgium: Louvain School of Management of Catholic University of Louvain Brazil: Coppead School of Business Federal University of Rio de Janeiro Chile: Pontifica Universidad Catolica Chile: Facultad de Economia y Negocios Universidad de Chile China: Fudan School of Management China: School of Economics & Management of Tsinghua University Denmark: Copenhagen Business School Finland: Aalto University School of Economics France: Audencia France: ESCP- Europe France: Institut Superieur du Commerce Germany: Fachhochschule Pforrzheim Germany: Otto Beisheim Graduate School of Management Mexico: Insitituto Tecnologico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey Netherlands: Tilburg University Peru: Universidad Peruana de Ciencias Applicadas UPC Singapore: School of Business National University of Singapore United Kingdom: Manchester Business School Manchester University

  • Women Support Groups:

    Chapter of National Association of Women MBA

Famous Alumni

Well known alumni of University of South Carolina Moore School of Business include:

F. Andy Lowrey - President & CEO, AgFirst Farm Credit Bank

Nicole Ringenberg - VP & Controller, Monsanto Company

Charles S. Way - Chairman, the Beach Company [developer of Isle of Palms, Kiawah Island and other Low Country and Southeast prime real estate]

Emory Wayne Rushton - Managing Director, Promontory Financial Group: Previously Senior Deputy Comptroller and Chief National Bank Examiner, U.S. Office of the Comptroller of the Currency

Larry W. Kellner - Retired CEO/Chairman, Continental Airlines

School Outcomes

Top Employers Of Graduates From This School Include: Bank of America, Exxonmobil, Wipro, Honeywell, Hewlett Packard

Industry Percent Employed Median Starting Salary
Business 36% $63,096
Finance / Accounting 34% $76,071
Marketing / Sales 30% $78,650
Other 28% $71,654
Technical 24% $80,922
Financial Services 18% $72,571
Consulting 16% $65,707
Manufacturing 16% $78,250
Consulting 14% $60,492
Operations / Logistics 14% $73,333
General Management 8% $60,375
Other 8% $68,750

School Employment Information

Graduation Employment 53%
Three Month Employment 30%
Questions about University of South Carolina, Moore School of Business Part Time MBA

Want more info about University of South Carolina, Moore School of Business Part Time MBA? Get free advice from education experts and Noodle community members.

  • Answer
  • How flexible is the part-time MBA program at USC’s Moore School of Business?

    Most part-time MBA programs are designed for students who are already fully employed, and USC’s is certainly no exception. The entire program is designed with flexibility in mind, giving students the opportunity to study in a convenient location at ...

    Answer See all answers