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University of Mississippi School of Business Administration Distance MBA

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University of Mississippi School of Business Administration Distance MBA's Full Profile

Program at a Glance

Program Type Online Part Time

Program Information

Degrees Awarded: Professional MBA.

Rankings

Rankings

School Rankings

The Princeton Review

N/A Best Business Schools (Southeast)

Admissions

Admissions

Admission Considerations

Very Important: Undergraduate GPA, Standardized Test Scores

Also Considered: Recommendations, Personal Essay

Admission Requirements

Required: Undergraduate GPA, Personal Essay, Standardized Test Scores, Recommendations, Extracurricular Activities

Optional: Work Experience

Admission Information

All applicants to the full-time MBA program at Ole Miss must provide an official transcript of undergraduate work showing a minimum 3.0 GPA for the final 60 semesters hours of academic work; an official GMAT score report (the school lists 550 as the cut-off for "acceptable" scores); two letters of recommendation; and a 400-word personal statement o...All applicants to the full-time MBA program at Ole Miss must provide an official transcript of undergraduate work showing a minimum 3.0 GPA for the final 60 semesters hours of academic work; an official GMAT score report (the school lists 550 as the cut-off for "acceptable" scores); two letters of recommendation; and a 400-word personal statement of purpose. Students who have not completed prerequisite course work in undergraduate business disciplines will be required to complete such courses successfully before commencing work on their graduate degrees. International students must meet all of the above requirements and submit TOEFL scores (minimum acceptable score is 600). Applicants to the professional MBA program "with two or more years of post-baccalaureate degree professional work experience" receive "particular consideration" from the Admissions Committee. The professional MBA program is "very competitive."

The Princeton Review

School Information

School Information

The following section features data representative of the entire business school, and numbers here are not necessarily reflective of the specific program.

Students and Faculty

Total Graduate Students 128
Percent International Students 5%
Total Full-Time Faculty 18
Full-Time Faculty 100%

Student Life

The swift pace of the full-time MBA program means that many students “study so much that it is hard to have a life. But when there are small breaks, the potential to have a great time is definitely there.” First and foremost, is Ole Miss football and the requisite tailgate parties beforehand, but there’s much more to the social scene than sports. The school “offers a wide variety of activities socially and academically that you can become involved in. This place has a lot of great traditions.” Students appreciate the Ole Miss grounds, which one describes as “a walking campus that promotes and produces beautiful people!”Hometown Oxford is a small, Southern college town distinguished by the university and the residences of several famous writers, including John Grisham. The town has become a travel destination for many, not only for Ole Miss sporting events but also for festivals such as the Double Decker Arts Festival and conferences as the Faulkner & Yoknapatawpha Conference (named after the author William Faulkner, who made his home in Oxford, and the fictional county in which much of his work is set). The city of Memphis is just 70 miles to the north. Full-timers at Ole Miss tend to be “very young. The majority are 22 years old. Some have had internships, but none have actually worked. It’s very difficult to have a discussion about business if you’ve never been involved in one. The few students with work expe­rience talk 95 percent of the time.” The student community is close. As one student explains, “One thing about going through an MBA ‘boot camp’ like this is that you come together very quickly. Because you’re all suffering together, people are very friendly and quick to help you out.”

Career

Ole Miss MBAs receive career support from the university’s Career Center. Students report that many of the best career opportunities come via the alumni network, which is “very supportive. The Ole Miss ‘brand’ is well-respected in the Southeast.” Employers that recruit on the Ole Miss campus include Axciom, Allstate, Bancorp South, FedEx, Harrah’s, IBM, International Paper, Regions Bank, and the Tennessee Valley Authority.

The Princeton Review

Students Say

The University of Mississippi—known affectionately as “Ole Miss” to its many students and supporters—offers students two MBA options. The first is an intensive, one-year full-time MBA, which does not require post-undergraduate professional experience for admission; the other is the two-year online MBA for working adults, which gives strong preference to students with at least two years of post-undergraduate business-related employment. Ole Miss’ one-year program runs 11 months, commencing in July and ending in May. The curriculum consists of 13 prescribed courses, taught cohort-style with an emphasis on “the integration of subjects into real business applications.” Students warn that the pro­gram is intense. As one explains, “Overall, you have to be very serious if you want to be in a one-year program. Don’t let the kind recruiters fool you: You are in for hell if you are not 100 percent committed…There is hardly any time to breathe. This is only for the extremely serious.” Instructors “expect a lot out of us,” and even “The administration is concerned with our performance and takes measures to continually monitor our progres­sion through the classes. Overall, the academic experience is rigorous.” One student con­curs, “The program could use more breaks. Or, they could lengthen it to ease the stress.” The part-time MBA at Ole Miss is more flexible, using “alternate methods of delivering course content” through internet tools. The online program delivers the same MBA con­tent and degree as the on campus program. In both the part-time and full-time program, “Professors all have business backgrounds and have been tenured for a long time, or they have short academic careers and long, successful business careers in the fields they teach.” Instructors typically employ “real-world examples and tie your education from them into your own work experiences. Dictation seldom happens. Discussion of the assigned readings is the primary classroom focus.”

The Princeton Review

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