Main Profile

At A Glance

Organic Chemistry II

This course is a continuation ofCHEM103: Organic Chemistry I. As you progress through the units below, you will continue to learn the different chemical reactions characteristic of each family of organic compounds. We will focus on four most important classes of reactions: electrophilic substitution at aromatic rings, nucleophilic addition at carbonyl compounds, hydrolysis of carboxylic acids, and carbon-carbon bond formation using enolates. The enolate portion of this course will cover the r...

Topics: Biology, Chemistry
Cost: Free

Contact

Organic Chemistry II's Full Profile

Overview

Description

This course is a continuation ofCHEM103: Organic Chemistry I. As you progress through the units below, you will continue to learn the different chemical reactions characteristic of each family of organic compounds. We will focus on four most important classes of reactions: electrophilic substitution at aromatic rings, nucleophilic addition at carbonyl compounds, hydrolysis of carboxylic acids, and carbon-carbon bond formation using enolates. The enolate portion of this course will cover the reactivity of functional groups.We will also look at synthetic strategies for making simple, small organic molecules, using the knowledge of organic chemistry accumulated thus far. At the end of this course, you will possess the tools you need to plan the synthesis of fairly complicated molecules, like those used in pharmaceutics. From the perspective of a synthetic organic chemist, the two most challenging aspects of synthesizing drug molecules are the incorporation of “molecular rings” (rings of 5, 6, 7, or more atoms) and/or fused ring systems into the structure of the molecule and the configuration of the chiral center, which will ensure the desired optical activity. For example, the drug Zantac contains amines, disulfides, and an oxole ring. By the end of this course, you will be able to rationalize your way through the synthesis of this drug.This course also introduces biological molecules, including carbohydrates, peptides and proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids, from a molecular perspective. You will learn how chemical reactions, especially oxidation and reduction reactions, form the basis of all life. In fact, plants reduce carbon dioxide to produce carbohydrates (sugars), whereas animals and humans oxidize the food eaten to produce energy. Humans store this produced energy in the form of “chemical bonds” (ATP, etc.). Note that in biology, you would study the functionality of these structures by asking, “How do they operate?” whereas in the field of organic chemistry, we ask: “What are they made of?” We will conclude this course with a unit on spectroscopy in which you will learn how to characterize and identify an unknown organic molecule based on its functional group’s vibrational modes (IR), mass (MS), light absorption (UV-Vis), and nuclei resonance (NMR).

Details

  • Days of the Week: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday
  • Level of Difficulty: Intermediate
  • Size: One-on-One
  • Cost: Free
  • Institution: Saylor
  • Topics: Biology, Chemistry

Provider Overview

About Saylor: The mission of the Saylor Foundation is to make education freely available to all. Guided by the belief that technology has the potential to circumvent barriers that prevent many individuals from participating in traditional schooling models, the Foundation is committed to developing and advancing inventive and effective ways of harnessing technology in order to drive the cost of education down to zero

Latest Tweet

Saylor Offers Courses In: Science

Questions about Organic Chemistry II

Want more info about Organic Chemistry II? Get free advice from education experts and Noodle community members.

  • Answer