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Brain Mechanisms for Hearing and Speech

An advanced course covering anatomical, physiological, behavioral, and computational studies of the central nervous system relevant to speech and hearing. Students learn primarily by discussions of scientific papers on topics of current interest. Recent topics include cell types and neural circuits in the auditory brainstem, organization and processing in the auditory cortex, auditory reflexes and descending systems, functional imaging of the human auditory system, quantitative methods for re...

Start Date: Sep 01, 2005
Cost: Free

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Overview

Description

An advanced course covering anatomical, physiological, behavioral, and computational studies of the central nervous system relevant to speech and hearing. Students learn primarily by discussions of scientific papers on topics of current interest. Recent topics include cell types and neural circuits in the auditory brainstem, organization and processing in the auditory cortex, auditory reflexes and descending systems, functional imaging of the human auditory system, quantitative methods for relating neural responses to behavior, speech motor control, cortical representation of language, and auditory learning in songbirds.

Details

  • Dates: Sep 01, 2005 to Dec 20, 2005
  • Days of the Week: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday
  • Level of Difficulty: Advanced
  • Size: Massive Open Online Course
  • Instructors: Prof. M. Christian Brown, Dr. Kenneth E. Hancock, Dr. Joseph S. Perkell, Prof. Joe C. Adams, Prof. Jennifer R. Melcher, Prof. Frank H. Guenther, Prof. David N. Caplan, Dr. Bertrand Delgutte
  • Cost: Free
  • Institution: MIT OCW

Provider Overview

About MIT OCW: MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) is a web-based publication of virtually all MIT course content. OCW is open and available to the world and is a permanent MIT activity.

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