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Greater Atlanta Adventist Academy

Greater Atlanta Adventist Academy is a coeducational private Adventist traditional school for students in grades 9 through 12.

Institution Type: Private Setting: Urban

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Greater Atlanta Adventist Academy's Full Profile

Overview

Overview

Greater Atlanta Adventist Academy says

In 1906, a Mission School was started in Atlanta, Georgia by Elder G.E. Peters on Greensferry Avenue adjacent to the Second Seventh-Day Adventist Church. The school had two classrooms, one upstairs and one downstairs. One teacher for grades 1-4 and one teacher for grades 5-8. In 1929, Atlanta University bought the Mission School and the church. The Second Seventh-Day Adventist Church bought a building at 105 Ashby Street, S.W. The congregation under the leadership of Elder A.B. Story changed the name from a Mission School to Berean Seventh-Day Adventist Church School. At the new location, the church was growing and the school was growing.In the 50's, the school outgrew its facilities and they relocated at 230 Westview Place, SW. The congregation renamed the school, Berean Jr. Academy and first through tenth grades were taught. On March 25, 1981, a proposal was filed with the Southern Union Conference, seeking authorization to add the 11th grade in the 1981-1982 school year and the 12th grade in the 1982-1983 school year. On May 4, a team drawn from the North American Division and Southern Union and South Atlantic Conferences filed a report to recommend that Berean Junior Academy be upgraded to full senior academy status. In 1906, a Mission School was started in Atlanta, Georgia by Elder G.E. Peters on Greensferry Avenue adjacent to the Second Seventh-Day Adventist Church. The school had two classrooms, one upstairs and one downstairs. One teacher for grades 1-4 and one teacher for grades 5-8. In 1929, Atlanta University bought the Mission School and the church. The Second Seventh-Day Adventist Church bought a building at 105 Ashby Street, S.W. The congregation under the leadership of Elder A.B. Story changed the name from a Mission School to Berean Seventh-Day Adventist Church School. At the new location, the church was growing and the school was growing.In the 50's, the school outgrew its facilities and they relocated at 230 Westview Place, SW. The congregation renamed the school, Berean Jr. Academy and first through tenth grades were taught. On March 25, 1981, a proposal was filed with the Southern Union Conference, seeking authorization to add the 11th grade in the 1981-1982 school year and the 12th grade in the 1982-1983 school year. On May 4, a team drawn from the North American Division and Southern Union and South Atlantic Conferences filed a report to recommend that Berean Junior Academy be upgraded to full senior academy status.

Finance

Finance

Private schools, including parochial and boarding, are funded through tuition and fees. The cost varies from school to school, but most families pay tuition to attend them. Many private schools offer financial aid or discounts, so it's worthwhile to ask about these options.

Admissions

Admissions
Phone
  (404) 799-0337
Email
  bbttking@aol.com

Students and Faculty

Students and Faculty

Enrollment Data

Total Enrollment 186
Enrollment By Grade
Grade Number of Students
9 52
10 46
11 42
12 46

Greater Atlanta Adventist Academy's relatively even enrollment profile may offer insights into student retention rates, local population changes, real estate costs, and the accessibility of alternative educational options. to find out more about the specific factors influencing Greater Atlanta Adventist Academy's enrollment numbers.

Student Teacher Ratio 11 : 1
Gender 52% Male / 48% Female
Student Diversity
Percentage of Student Body
Multi-racial 1%
Hispanic/Latino 3%
Black or African American 96%

Associations & Memberships

Other school associations

General Conference of the Seventh-Day Adventist Church (GCSDAC)

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