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At A Glance

The University of Texas School of Law

The first year curriculum includes six required one-semester, four-credit courses: Criminal Law, Constitutional Law I, Civil Procedure, Contracts, Property, and Torts. Each student takes three of these courses in the fall and three in the spring. Students also take a one-credit Legal Research and Writing course in both the fall and spring. Finally, first-year students each take one elective class in the spring semester. In the fall semester, each student takes one of his or her four-credit courses in a small section (25-30 students). The small-section class is designed to promote greater classroom discussion, enhance student-faculty interaction inside and outside the classroom, and encourage innovative instructional methods. In addition, each small-section class includes a writing component that enables students to receive from their professors feedback and instruction concerning legal writing. This writing component carries an addition credit, making the small-section course a five-credit course. The small group program represents a major commitment by the Law School of faculty resources to the core instructional program and reflects the importance the Law School places on classroom instruction.

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The University of Texas School of Law's Full Profile

Program At a Glance

Total Program Enrollment 1065
Incoming LSAT Scores (25th-75th Percentile) 163 - 169
Incoming GPA (25th-75th Percentile) 3.52 - 3.82
Bar Exam First Time Pass Rate 94.65%
Percent Employed (9 Months After Graduation) 92.0%
In State Tuition $32,376
Out of State Tuition $48,075

Overview

Overview

About The University of Texas School of Law

The first year curriculum includes six required one-semester, four-credit courses: Criminal Law, Constitutional Law I, Civil Procedure, Contracts, Property, and Torts. Each student takes three of these courses in the fall and three in the spring. Students also take a one-credit Legal Research and Writing course in both the fall and spring. Finally, first-year students each take one elective class in the spring semester. In the fall semester, each student takes one of his or her four-credit courses in a small section (25-30 students). The small-section class is designed to promote greater classroom discussion, enhance student-faculty interaction inside and outside the classroom, and encourage innovative instructional methods. In addition, each small-section class includes a writing component that enables students to receive from their professors feedback and instruction concerning legal writing. This writing component carries an addition credit, making the small-section course a five-credit course. The small group program represents a major commitment by the Law School of faculty resources to the core instructional program and reflects the importance the Law School places on classroom instruction.

Reviews

At the University of Texas, bigger is better. “The large size of the school provides oppor­tunities to specialize in or explore almost any area of law” through diverse coursework, clinics, student organizations, journals, and other top-notch programs for future lawyers. The three-year JD program kicks off with a series of core courses in civil procedure, prop­erty, and other fundamental areas. These courses are often “fantastic,” as “the school is very good about getting its top faculty members to teach 1L classes, exposing us to the best professors early rather than making us wait three years,” says one student. Another stu­dent comments on the strength of the JD and states, “The legal writing program has recently been overhauled and is now a huge point of emphasis for first year students—which is a big strength, I think, given that every practicing attorney I’ve ever talked to has stressed the importance of effective legal writing.” A team of attorneys with “stellar credentials,”…“the faculty at Texas has the right balance of prestige and accessibility.” As at most schools, “Some are better teachers than others,” and not all of them are focused on students. “Some professors go out of there way to keep up with student progress,” while others prefer to concentrate on their own careers or research. Fortunately, “Most legiti­mately care about educating and some will go out of their way to make students under­stand and feel capable.” In fact, “several professors even throw parties for students, raffle off brunch to the class and offer a variety of other ways to get to know them better in a far less formal setting.”UT’s size does come with some downfalls. Specifically, students battle with the reams of red tape typical to large public institutions. “Since the law school is only one small part of the huge bureaucratic entity that is the University of Texas, things can sometimes get con­fusing—paying tuition, for instance, is done through one entity (not the law school), obtaining a student ID is done through another, financial aid through another, residency through another, etc.” Students also note that there have been recent upheavals in the administration, and “a lot of faculty drama that happens behind the scenes.” At the same time, the school works to mitigate the class size by dividing students into smaller study groups through a program known as the society system, to good effect: “The society sys­tem, which makes the large class size manageable and gives each student a smaller social group to interact with on a regular basis, helps greatly in personalizing the school and allaying feelings of being overwhelmed and alone in the school environment.” Overall, students at UT Austin agree that, “the experience is comparable to an elite private school,” but without the hefty price tag. With its low in-state tuition costs, “UT is probably the best value law school in the country for in-state students,” while qualified “out-of-staters can either acquire residency (and get in state tuition) after a year at UT, or else can negotiate an in-state rate as a kind of scholarship offer.”Real-world preparation is taken seriously at UT Law. In addition to substantive courses in the curriculum, “students can and should participate in novice mock trial and moot court if they want more "hands on" courtroom experience, even as 1Ls.” “Being located in the state capital provides many government-related opportunities not available else­where,” and the school offers “a lot of clinics and internship programs that allow students to get tons of real-world practice in law.” Widely considered the “best in Texas,” UT’s “greatest strength is its regional ties. It is well-placed among two very large legal markets (Dallas and Houston), which boast salaries on par with New York, DC, and LA along with a much lower cost of living.” For better or for worse, one would be hard pressed to find a particular angle in recruiting either. “The school seems to place well enough in firms, non­profits, and government, but does not excel in any one of those.”

- The Princeton Review

Academics

Academics

Degree Programs Offered

Graduates Last Year: 371

Description: A program that prepares individuals for the independent professional practice of law, for taking state and national bar examinations, and for advanced research in jurisprudence. Includes instruction in the theory and practice of the legal system, including the statutory, administrative, and judicial components of civil and criminal law.

Job Opportunities:

Lawyers
Represent clients in criminal and civil litigation and other legal proceedings, draw up legal documents, or manage or advise clients on legal transactions. May specialize in a single area or may practice broadly in many areas of law.
Judicial Law Clerks
Assist judges in court or by conducting research or preparing legal documents.
Administrative Law Judges, Adjudicators, and Hearing Officers
Conduct hearings to recommend or make decisions on claims concerning government programs or other government-related matters. Determine liability, sanctions, or penalties, or recommend the acceptance or rejection of claims or settlements.
Arbitrators, Mediators, and Conciliators
Facilitate negotiation and conflict resolution through dialogue. Resolve conflicts outside of the court system by mutual consent of parties involved.
Judges, Magistrate Judges, and Magistrates
Arbitrate, advise, adjudicate, or administer justice in a court of law. May sentence defendant in criminal cases according to government statutes or sentencing guidelines. May determine liability of defendant in civil cases. May perform wedding ceremonies.
Law Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in law. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.

Joint Degree Programs Offered

JD/MBA; JD/MPA in Public Affairs; JD/MA in Latin American Studies; JD/MS in Community and Regional Planning; JD/MA in Russian, East European & European studies; JD/MA in Middle Eastern Studies; JD/Master of Social Work; JD/Master of Global Policy Studies; JD/Master of Information Studies; informal combined programs leading to the JD & PhD in Government, History, or Philosophy

Specialty Law Programs

  • Civil Procedure
  • Commercial
  • Constitutional
  • Corporation Securities
  • Criminal
  • Environmental
  • Human Rights
  • International
  • Labor
  • Legal Philosophy
  • Property
  • Taxation
  • Intellectual Property

Faculty Information

Total Faculty 156
Full-Time Faculty 81
Deans, Librarians, and Others Who Teach 2
Part-Time Faculty 73
Faculty Gender 63% Male
35% Female
Student Teacher Ratio 11 : 1

Accreditation

Accredited by American Bar Association

Student Body

Student Body
Gender Breakdown 54% Male
46% Female
Student Diversity
Percentage
White 61%
Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander 0%
Multi-racial 3%
International 2%
Hispanic/Latino 16%
Ethnicity Unknown 8%
Black or African American 5%
Asian 6%
American Indian or Alaska Native 0%

Finance

Finance

Sticker Price

In-State

On-Campus Off-Campus
Stated Tuition $32,376 Same as On-Campus
Housing $10,946 N/A
Books N/A N/A
Total (before financial aid) $43,322 $32,376

Out-of-State

On-Campus Off-Campus
Stated Tuition $48,075 Same as On-Campus
Housing $10,946 N/A
Books N/A N/A
Total (before financial aid) $59,021 $48,075

Financial Aid

72% Graduate students receiving financial aid (loans and grants)

$49,574 Average financial aid amount

Admissions

Admissions

Application Information

Deadline for Regular Decision: March 1

Average Age Admitted: 24

Application Fee: $70

Incoming Class

The University of Texas School of Law's entering class of 2012 enrolled having these exam grades:

Exam Enrollment Type 25th - 75th Percentile
LSAT Full-Time 163 - 169
LSAT Total 163 - 169

The University of Texas School of Law's entering class of 2012 enrolled having these college GPA's:

Enrollment Type 25th - 75th Percentile
Full-Time 3.52 - 3.82
Total 3.52 - 3.82

Admission Considerations

Very Important: Undergraduate GPA, Personal Essay

Also Considered: Recommendations

Admission Requirements

Required: Resume, Undergraduate GPA, Personal Essay, Standardized Test Scores

Optional: Extracurricular Activities, Interview, State Residency, Work Experience, Recommendations

Outcomes

Outcomes

Bar Exam Results

Percent Reporting 91%
First Time Pass Rate 95%
Avg. Pass Rate In This State 85%

Campus Recruitment

Number of Employers Recruiting on Campus 500
First Year Recruitment Time Summer
Second Year Recruitment Time Summer

Employment

Percent Employed (9 Months After Graduation) 92%
Average Starting Salary $91,750
Job Sector Number of Graduates Percent of Graduates
Firm Sized 2-10 46 13%
Firm Sized 11-25 19 6%
Firm Sized 26-50 7 6%
Firm Sized 51-100 12 4%
Firm Sized 101-250 9 3%
Firm Sized 251-500 22 6%
Firm Sized 501+ 69 20%
Business Industry 39 11%
Government 41 12%
Public Interest 30 9%
Federal Clerkship 31 9%
State Clerkship 11 3%
Academia 1 0%
Unknown Employer Type 3 1%
Unemployed Number of Graduates Percent of Graduates
Unemployed, Not Seeking 7 2%
Unemployed, Seeking 13 3%
Pursuing Graduate Degree 7 2%

Top Employment Locations

State Percent Employed
CA 4%
NY 5%
TX 74%
International 1%

Famous Alumni

Well known alumni of The University of Texas School of Law include:

  • Diane Wood - United States Court of Appeals, 7th Circuit
  • Ron Kirk - United States Trade Representative
  • Frederico Pena - Former Secretary of Transportation
  • Kay Bailey Hutchison - United States Senator
  • Joseph D. Jamail, Jr. - Jamail & Kolius Law Firm

Associations & Memberships

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