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At A Glance

Stanford University Law School

A curriculum that begins with the fundamentals but is then rich in interdisciplinary learning opportunities, clinics that teach law students how to be lawyers who make a difference, and programs and centers that catalyze scholarship, research, and dialogue on important issues - these are the forums through which Stanford Law shapes the future.

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Stanford University Law School's Full Profile

Program At a Glance

Total Program Enrollment 575
Incoming LSAT Scores (25th-75th Percentile) 168 - 173
Incoming GPA (25th-75th Percentile) 3.76 - 3.96
Bar Exam First Time Pass Rate 91.2%
Percent Employed (9 Months After Graduation) 98.0%
Tuition $50,802

Overview

Overview

About Stanford University Law School

A curriculum that begins with the fundamentals but is then rich in interdisciplinary learning opportunities, clinics that teach law students how to be lawyers who make a difference, and programs and centers that catalyze scholarship, research, and dialogue on important issues - these are the forums through which Stanford Law shapes the future.

Reviews

“People are happy” at Stanford Law School, and why wouldn’t they be? There are “tons of programs,” an array of specialized centers, and a couple dozen joint-degree options. The eleven clinics here include a Supreme Court litigation clinic and an IP Innovation clinic, just to list a couple. “The resources available to us at Stanford are fantastic, and sometimes unbelievable,” gushes a 2L. The “amazingly brilliant” and “diverse” faculty is “a great mix of practically minded and experienced—professors and wild-minded theorists.” Professors are “incredible lecturers and easy to approach outside of the class­room.” “I have yet to meet a professor who is not only doing something amazing but is completely approachable and dying to help us get jobs and do research,” gloats a 2L. Moreover, Stanford is “so small that everything is very easy to do.” “All of my seminars have had fewer than ten people,” gloats a 2L. “The university as a whole has a lot of red tape,” but the law school’s administration is “very receptive” and accessible at almost every level. “It’s the opposite of the ‘factory’ feeling at large professional schools,” explains a 3L. “If you want to do something new or nontraditional, just ask. Usually you can work something out.”The Stanford campus is “sprawling” and “beautiful,” with “acres of rolling green hills for hiking, and palm trees everywhere.” “The law school is hideous from the outside but, inside, it’s quite nice.” The library is a world-class research facility “and all law students have twenty-four-hour access to study there.” “I can’t study in any other university library,” admits a comfortable 1L, “because I have become too accustomed to the law school’s Aeron chairs.”A few students call Career Services “underwhelming,” but “Pretty much everyone can get a firm job if they want one.” They can get that job anywhere in the country, too. Less than 50 percent of all newly minted Stanford Law grads take jobs in California. Stanford is also “seriously committed to public interest law,” and the “great loan repayment program” here is arguably the best in the country. Also worth noting is the impressive historical fact that more than 100 Stanford law graduates have clerked for one of the Supreme Court Justices.Of course, nothing is perfect, even at Stanford. Some students love the pass/fail grading system while others say it provides little incentive to work hard. Despite these complaints, though, students call Stanford “the best law school west of the Appalachians,” and they “have a hard time seeing why anyone would choose to go to law school anywhere else.”

- The Princeton Review

Academics

Academics

Degree Programs Offered

Graduates Last Year: 193

Description: A program that prepares individuals for the independent professional practice of law, for taking state and national bar examinations, and for advanced research in jurisprudence. Includes instruction in the theory and practice of the legal system, including the statutory, administrative, and judicial components of civil and criminal law.

Job Opportunities:

Lawyers
Represent clients in criminal and civil litigation and other legal proceedings, draw up legal documents, or manage or advise clients on legal transactions. May specialize in a single area or may practice broadly in many areas of law.
Judicial Law Clerks
Assist judges in court or by conducting research or preparing legal documents.
Administrative Law Judges, Adjudicators, and Hearing Officers
Conduct hearings to recommend or make decisions on claims concerning government programs or other government-related matters. Determine liability, sanctions, or penalties, or recommend the acceptance or rejection of claims or settlements.
Arbitrators, Mediators, and Conciliators
Facilitate negotiation and conflict resolution through dialogue. Resolve conflicts outside of the court system by mutual consent of parties involved.
Judges, Magistrate Judges, and Magistrates
Arbitrate, advise, adjudicate, or administer justice in a court of law. May sentence defendant in criminal cases according to government statutes or sentencing guidelines. May determine liability of defendant in civil cases. May perform wedding ceremonies.
Law Teachers, Postsecondary
Teach courses in law. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.

Joint Degree Programs Offered

JD/MBA 3 2/3-4 yrs; JD/MA 3 yrs.; JD/PhD 6 yrs.

Specialty Law Programs

  • Civil Procedure
  • Commercial
  • Constitutional
  • Corporation Securities
  • Criminal
  • Environmental
  • Government Services
  • Human Rights
  • International
  • Labor
  • Legal History
  • Legal Philosophy
  • Property
  • Taxation
  • Intellectual Property

Faculty Information

Total Faculty 111
Full-Time Faculty 66
Deans, Librarians, and Others Who Teach 14
Part-Time Faculty 31
Faculty Gender 62% Male
37% Female
Student Teacher Ratio 7 : 1

Accreditation

Accredited by American Bar Association

Student Body

Student Body
Gender Breakdown 57% Male
43% Female
Student Diversity
Percentage
White 55%
Multi-racial 8%
International 2%
Hispanic/Latino 13%
Ethnicity Unknown 4%
Black or African American 7%
Asian 10%
American Indian or Alaska Native 0%

Finance

Finance

Sticker Price

On-Campus Off-Campus
Stated Tuition $50,802 Same as On-Campus
Housing $19,005 N/A
Books N/A N/A
Total (before financial aid) $69,807 $50,802

Financial Aid

79% Graduate students receiving financial aid (loans and grants)

$55,261 Average financial aid amount

Admissions

Admissions

Application Information

Deadline for Regular Decision: February 1

Average Age Admitted: 24

Incoming Class

Stanford University Law School's entering class of 2012 enrolled having these exam grades:

Exam Enrollment Type 25th - 75th Percentile
LSAT Full-Time 168 - 173
LSAT Total 168 - 173

Stanford University Law School's entering class of 2012 enrolled having these college GPA's:

Enrollment Type 25th - 75th Percentile
Full-Time 3.76 - 3.96
Total 3.76 - 3.96

Admission Considerations

Very Important: Recommendations, Undergraduate GPA, Personal Essay

Admission Requirements

Required: Personal Essay, Recommendations, Undergraduate GPA, Standardized Test Scores

Optional: Work Experience, Extracurricular Activities, Interview, State Residency

Rankings

Rankings

The Princeton Review

#2 Best Classroom Experience
#3 Best Professors
#3 Toughest To Get Into
#9 Best Environment for Minority Students

U.S. News & World Report

Outcomes

Outcomes

Bar Exam Results

Percent Reporting 92%
First Time Pass Rate 91%
Avg. Pass Rate In This State 76%

Employment

Percent Employed (9 Months After Graduation) 98%
Job Sector Number of Graduates Percent of Graduates
Firm Sized 2-10 1 1%
Firm Sized 11-25 3 2%
Firm Sized 26-50 0 2%
Firm Sized 51-100 1 1%
Firm Sized 101-250 11 6%
Firm Sized 251-500 13 7%
Firm Sized 501+ 61 35%
Business Industry 14 8%
Government 3 2%
Public Interest 11 6%
Federal Clerkship 51 29%
State Clerkship 5 3%
Academia 1 1%
Unemployed Number of Graduates Percent of Graduates
Unemployed, Seeking 3 2%
Pursuing Graduate Degree 2 1%

Top Employment Locations

State Percent Employed
NY 10%
DC 10%
CA 50%
International 3%

Famous Alumni

Well known alumni of Stanford University Law School include:

  • Ron Noble - Secretary General of Interpol and law professor
  • Max Baucus - US Senator (1979 to Present)
  • Anthony Romero - Executive Director of ACLU (2001-Present)
  • Warren Christopher - Former Secretary of State (1993 to 1997)
  • Sandra Day O'Connor - First female Supreme Court Justice (1981 to 2006)

Associations & Memberships

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