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Loyola University Chicago, Quinlan School of Business Executive MBA

The Quinlan School of Business at Loyola University Chicago is dedicated to Loyola’s Jesuit tradition of educating responsible leaders for a rapidly changing business environment. Our students learn in innovative ways that prepare them for personal and professional success. Virtually all of our faculty members have the highest degree in their respective fields. Our accomplished faculty and talented professional staff are dedicated to students’ success. Quinlan alumni also contribute to student development by connecting them with internships, career opportunities, and other valuable support.

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Loyola University Chicago, Quinlan School of Business Executive MBA's Full Profile

Program at a Glance

Program Type Executive
Total Program Enrollment 38
Tuition (Total) $84,258

Rankings

Rankings

School Rankings

The Princeton Review

N/A Best Business Schools (Midwest)

Admissions

Admissions

Application Information

  • Acceptance Rate: 71% accepted out of 401 applicants
  • Average Age Admitted: 24
  • Average Incoming GPA: 3.27
  • Average Years Work Experience: 4
  • Application Fee: $50

Admission Considerations

Very Important: Recommendations, Undergraduate GPA, Personal Essay, Standardized Test Scores

Admission Requirements

Required: Recommendations, Extracurricular Activities, Undergraduate GPA, Personal Essay, Standardized Test Scores

Optional: Work Experience

Admission Information

At Loyola, the academic calendar is divided into quarters. Accordingly, there are four start dates each year, so the school is continuously accepting and enrolling new students. To apply, prospective students must submit an application form, two letters of recommendation, a statement of purpose, a current resume, undergraduate transcripts, and offi...At Loyola, the academic calendar is divided into quarters. Accordingly, there are four start dates each year, so the school is continuously accepting and enrolling new students. To apply, prospective students must submit an application form, two letters of recommendation, a statement of purpose, a current resume, undergraduate transcripts, and official GMAT test scores.

The Princeton Review

School Information

School Information

The following section features data representative of the entire business school, and numbers here are not necessarily reflective of the specific program.

Students and Faculty

Total Graduate Students 473
Percent International Students 14%
Total Full-Time Faculty 84
Full-Time Faculty 88%

Student Life

Loyola is a large, urban university, which attracts “all different backgrounds, ages, inter­ests, career paths (if working), intelligence levels, and points of life.” While some stu­dents are too busy to participate in extracurricular activities, others find time to “belong to a number of clubs that meet before class once or twice a month.” More informally, there are “plenty of opportunities to mingle after class and on weekends,” and students attend “social events at bars or restaurants after class every month.” Still, you won’t get the social atmosphere you’d find on a residential campus: “Although the social life is improving, the school definitely feels like a commuter school.”“Located in the heart of downtown Chicago,” Loyola’s well-placed campus is a major benefit of the program. Academic resources are good, and “The library is excellent.” “Getting information from any source at the school has been easy.” Unfortunately, many business school classrooms lack modern technology and suffer from “a poor layout, not conducive to class discussion.” A student adds, “More than 30 percent of assignments are group related, yet less than 5 percent of computers in the library cater toward group work. Options like LCD projectors (or mounted televisions with a monitor input) in group rooms would be greatly appreciated.”

Career

Loyola’s downtown “location in a world class city” brings students within a stone’s throw of many reputable employers. This private university maintains a great local rep­utation, and the focus on practical skills throughout the MBA curriculum helps to pre­pare students for the workplace. A current student agrees, “In this time of economic cri­sis, I feel incredibly prepared and optimistic that my MBA degree will make me stand out from the competition.” Loyola University’s Career Management Services assists job seekers through resume cri¬tiques, career workshops, and advising. They also operate an online recruiting program, which allows students to research employers, post their resumes, and sign up for cam¬pus interviews via the web. Despite these services, “The school could do a much better job attracting more quality employers to recruit at Loyola.” A current MBA candidate laments, “The school is in a sweet spot for business in the country but doesn’t take full advantage of the networking possibilities.” On the other hand, “There are students who have found great jobs through Career Management and have received excellent coaching from the staff....It all depends on what a person expects.”

The Princeton Review

About

At Loyola, we provide an excellent faculty, a diversity of students, the resources of a great university, and individualized attention to create a superb learning environment. By studying with us, you will enhance your ability to think critically, solve problems, work in a team environment, think strategically about technology, and effectively communicate your ideas. Consistent with 450 years of Jesuit education, we emphasize the foundation necessary to make ethical decisions in today's complex business environment.

The Princeton Review

Students Say

A university founded in the Jesuit tradition, “Loyola is a school that is focused on devel­oping the entire individual,” and business ethics is a mainstay of the MBA program. While MBA course content resembles other graduate business programs, Loyola distin­guishes itself in a number of ways. In particular, “Success is not measured in dollars, but rather [in] how one can contribute to society in a meaningful and productive way.” To that end, “Every class incorporates ethics and ethical situations and relates them to real-world business issues.” At the same time, the curriculum focuses on practical business, and “is very relevant and applicable.” Through coursework, students work in teams, analyze case studies, or work on live projects in cooperation with a partner business or organization. A current student enthuses, “I take advantage of student organizations and outside consulting projects, and often feel that these have more value than my classes.” To add an international perspective to the MBA, “The study abroad program is fantas­tic,” offering numerous two-week summer courses overseas. A current student enthuses, “I will be afforded wonderful study abroad opportunities through this program and will be traveling to China, India, and Rome.”Combining expertise with excellence, the majority of Loyola professors are “highly expe­rienced and make the learning experience worthwhile.” While there are some “pure aca­demics” on staff, they are outnumbered by current and former business leaders, who bring real-world content to the coursework. In fact, Loyola’s adjunct professors “are among the best at bringing a ‘real-world’ perspective into the classroom.” Most impor­tantly, professors are “very enthusiastic about their subject and classes, and they all very much love teaching.” As a result, “The classroom experience is dynamic and engaging,” and the “thought-provoking course content” inspires discussion and critical thinking. A student enthuses, “I have enjoyed many of my classes so much, I am actually somewhat disappointed when the quarter comes to an end!” At the same time, Loyola is a large school, so it’s easier to get lost in the crowds. A current student admits, “It’s difficult to have good, thoughtful discussions in classes with 50 people in attendance.”Loyola’s “flexible class schedule” is great for part-time students, and “the course load is perfect for a professional who has a full-time job.” In addition, the “ability to switch between full-time and part-time status” gives students the opportunity to complete their degree at their own pace. Full-timers, on the other hand, sometimes feel “the course work doesn’t seem as challenging as it could be.” A school on the move, “The GSB has grown considerably just within the last year,” and students admit, “The administration seems a little overwhelmed by the number of students currently enrolled.” Fortunately, a student writes, “The school is committed to providing students with an exceptional experience. When there are hurdles to overcome, the administration is quick to identify how things might improve.”

The Princeton Review

Academic

At Loyola, we help prepare you for the global demands of business by routinely including international considerations in all our courses and by offering courses that singularly focus on the international dimensions of a topic. Students whose career goals demand an intensive grounding in international business can take advantage of our innovative study abroad programs. We offer two-week courses at a number of international locations including our campuses in China and Rome. Each course focuses on topical international issues. Both part-time and full-time students have the opportunity to attend.

The Princeton Review

Degrees Awarded

MBA, 14 to 18 courses; 1.5 years, full time; 2.5 yrs, part time; MBA in Health Care Management, 17 classes; 2 years, part time; MS in Accountancy; 12 courses, 1 year full time; 2 years, part time; MS in Integrated Marketing Communications; 14 to 18 courses, 1.5 year full time; 2.5 years part time; MS in Supply Chain Management; 14 to 18 courses, 1.5 years full time; 2.5 years part time; MS in Human Resources; 14 courses, 1.5 years full time; 2.5 years part time; MS in Finance; 14 to 18 courses, 1.5 years full time; 2.5 years part time; MBA for Executives; 30 courses (48 credit hours), 1.5 years part time; International study at Loyola's Rome Center Campus or at the Beijing Center in China.

Student Services

  • Campus Wide Network
  • Centers Of Research:

    Center for Social Enterprise and Responsibility, Center for International Business, Center for Financial & Policy Studies, Center for Risk Management, and Supply and Value Chain Center

  • International Student Support Groups:

    Quinlan supports the Quinlan Graduate International Club (Quinlan GIC) and holds an additional orientation for this student group. This organization fosters international education, be it studying in the USA as an international student or studying outside of the USA for a short duration. Quinlan GIC also aims to help international students from different countries in their transition into the American culture by providing support in any way possible. Through the club's academic and networking events, as well as its cultural and social activities, Quinlan students have an opportunity to interact with international colleagues who have successfully integrated into the United States. Included in this are community service projects which provide a greater exposure to the Chicago community, the American workplace, and American culture.

    Another available resource is the university's Office of International Programs:

    http://www.luc.edu/oip/

  • Research Facilities:

    Center for Social Enterprise and Responsibility, Center for International Business, Center for Financial & Policy Studies, Center for Risk Management, and Supply and Value Chain Center

  • Study Abroad:

    Vietnam, Cambodia, Thailand, Chile, Italy, England, Germany

  • Women Support Groups:

    Women in Business (WIB) -- This organization focuses on providing Quinlan students and alumni with an opportunity to develop personally and professionally through addressing issues that women face in the workplace, as well as fostering relationships among current students, alumni, faculty, and business leaders. The organization focuses on three key components: networking, workshops and speaker series.

Famous Alumni

Well known alumni of Loyola University Chicago Graduate School of Business include:

Thomas Hund - CFO & Executive Vice President for Burlington Northern Santa Fe Corporation.

Mary Tolan - Founder, President & CEO, Accretive Health, Inc.

Brenda Barnes - Sara Lee, CEO - Retired

Robert Parkinson - Chairman & CEO, Baxter International

Michael Quinlan - Chairman Emeritus, Chairman & CEO, McDonald's - Retired

School Outcomes

Top Employers Of Graduates From This School Include: Aon, Baxter Healthcare Corporation, Nokia, Deloitte, PepsiCo

Industry Percent Employed Median Starting Salary
Marketing / Sales 27% $70,000
Finance / Accounting 20% $70,000
Consulting 18% $90,000
Other 17% $50,000
Other 16% $50,000
General Management 12% $60,000
Financial Services 10% $60,000
Manufacturing 9% $70,000
Operations / Logistics 8% $70,000
Consulting 7% $90,000
Information Technology 6% $90,000
Human Resources 4% $60,000
Non Profit 4% $50,000
Government 1% $70,000

School Employment Information

Graduation Employment 90%
Three Month Employment 6%
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