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Spectroscopy

Spectroscopy is the study of the interaction between matter and electromagnetic radiation. Molecules respond to different types of radiation in different ways, depending on the frequency (?) or wavelength (?) of the radiation. In General Chemistry, we studied spectroscopy as a tool for explaining the quantum mechanical model of the atom. In that course, we learned that light is an electromagnetic radiation of a wavelength that is visible to the human eye. We also learned that light, which exi...

Topics: Chemistry
Cost: Free

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Spectroscopy is the study of the interaction between matter and electromagnetic radiation. Molecules respond to different types of radiation in different ways, depending on the frequency (?) or wavelength (?) of the radiation. In General Chemistry, we studied spectroscopy as a tool for explaining the quantum mechanical model of the atom. In that course, we learned that light is an electromagnetic radiation of a wavelength that is visible to the human eye. We also learned that light, which exists in tiny “packets” called photons, exhibits properties of both waves and particles, a characteristic referred to as the wave-particle duality. The quantized relationship is defined as E = hv, where E is energy, h is Plank’s constant, and v is frequency.Spectroscopy and spectrometry are often used in chemistry for the identification of substances through the spectrum from which they are emitted or by which they are absorbed. The type of spectroscopic technique is defined by the type of radiative energy used, the nature of the response, or the nature of the material being studied. In Organic Chemistry, we used spectroscopy for structure elucidation of organic molecules.Spectrometry is the spectroscopic technique used to assess the concentration or amount of a given chemical species. In Analytical Chemistry, we studied spectroscopy primarily for measuring analyte concentrations. The instrument used for these types of measurements is called a spectrometer, spectrophotometer, or spectrograph.This one-semester course is designed to provide you with a more thorough description of the theory behind each spectroscopic technique as well as its applications. The course is meant to build upon itself, and each unit requires a working knowledge of the material from preceding units. The first unit covers mass spectrometry (MS). It is followed by a unit on ultraviolet and visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis) and its application to structural information in addition to analytical techniques. The third unit deals with infrared spectroscopy (IR), where you will practice using the combination of the first three spectroscopic methods to obtain structural information of organic molecules. The final unit comprises nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. In this unit you will be required to combine concepts from all spectroscopic techniques discussed.

Details

  • Days of the Week: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday
  • Level of Difficulty: All Levels
  • Size: One-on-One
  • Cost: Free
  • Institution: Saylor
  • Topics: Chemistry

Provider Overview

About Saylor: The mission of the Saylor Foundation is to make education freely available to all. Guided by the belief that technology has the potential to circumvent barriers that prevent many individuals from participating in traditional schooling models, the Foundation is committed to developing and advancing inventive and effective ways of harnessing technology in order to drive the cost of education down to zero

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