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Mechanics II - Dynamics

Dynamics is a sub-branch of the general field of study known as Mechanics. It is very closely related to—and often combined with—the study of Statics, which you encountered inME102: Mechanics I.In both Statics and Dynamics, we use Newton’s 2ndLaw: F = ma. In Statics, the sum of the applied forces is always zero, thus making the acceleration zero. This was very important to the structures studied in Statics. Catastrophe generally results when structures (like bridges and buildings) accelerate....

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Dynamics is a sub-branch of the general field of study known as Mechanics. It is very closely related to—and often combined with—the study of Statics, which you encountered inME102: Mechanics I.In both Statics and Dynamics, we use Newton’s 2ndLaw: F = ma. In Statics, the sum of the applied forces is always zero, thus making the acceleration zero. This was very important to the structures studied in Statics. Catastrophe generally results when structures (like bridges and buildings) accelerate. Very likely you are quite pleased—even if you do not realize it every time—when you cross a bridge that does not accelerate while you are on it, and we have Newton’s First Law to thank for it. Newton’s First Law states that objects will continue to do what they are doing unless unbalanced forces make them do otherwise. This law includes the law equilibrium condition that the moments will also sum to zero, and that there will thus be no rotational acceleration. In Dynamics, the sum of the forces will not necessarily be zero (if it is zero, then the sum of the moments is not). We will thus study accelerated motion.As withPHYS101: Introduction to Mechanics, we will begin this course by studying the accelerated motion of particles (also known as the Kinematics of Particles). We will only look at what an object is doing (the position, velocity, acceleration)—not why it might be doing that.In Unit 2, we will take a look at the Kinetics of Particles, or the study of thewhyof Kinematics. We will want to know how to change the velocity of a particle in order to learn what causes accelerations.We will then take a step towards the more realistic by considering the size, shape, and orientation of objects as they accelerate. We term this type of motion “Rigid Body Motion.” We begin, in Unit 3, with the Kinematics of Rigid Bodies, looking first at the rotational motion of objects. We will then introduce the possibility that objects can move (and accelerate) translationallyandrotationally at the same time. In Unit 4, we will look at sample problems that will help you understand the concepts learned in Unit 1, Unit 2, and Unit 3. Next, in Unit 5, we study the Kinematics of such motion.In Unit 6, we will look at many of the principles we learned in the first few units-this time, in three-dimensions. We will begin with the three-dimensional Kinematics of a Rigid Body and then finish with three-dimensional Kinetics.We will complete our study of Dynamics with Unit 7, a look at Vibrational Motion, or what happens when objects oscillate about a neutral state. In Unit 4, we will look at sample problems that will help you understand the concepts learned in Unit 5, Unit 6, and Unit 7.

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  • Days of the Week: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday
  • Level of Difficulty: Intermediate
  • Size: One-on-One
  • Cost: Free
  • Institution: Saylor

Provider Overview

About Saylor: The mission of the Saylor Foundation is to make education freely available to all. Guided by the belief that technology has the potential to circumvent barriers that prevent many individuals from participating in traditional schooling models, the Foundation is committed to developing and advancing inventive and effective ways of harnessing technology in order to drive the cost of education down to zero

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