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Introduction to Mechanics

Physics 101 is the first course in the Introduction to Physics sequence. In general, the quest of physics is to develop descriptions of the natural world that correspond closely to actual observations. Given this definition, the story behind everything in the universe is one of physics. In practice, the field of physics is more often limited to the discovery and refinement of the basic laws that underlie the behavior of matter and energy. While biology is founded upon physics, in practice, th...

Topics: General Engineering, Algebra, Calculus, General Mathematics, Geometry, Trigonometry, Biology, Chemistry, Physics
Cost: Free

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Description

Physics 101 is the first course in the Introduction to Physics sequence. In general, the quest of physics is to develop descriptions of the natural world that correspond closely to actual observations. Given this definition, the story behind everything in the universe is one of physics. In practice, the field of physics is more often limited to the discovery and refinement of the basic laws that underlie the behavior of matter and energy. While biology is founded upon physics, in practice, the study of biology generally assumes that the present understanding of physical laws is accurate. Chemistry is more closely dependent on physics and assumes that physical laws provide accurate predictions. Engineering, for the most part, is applied physics. In this course, we will study physics from the ground up, learning the basic principles of physical laws, their application to the behavior of objects, and the use of the scientific method in driving advances in this knowledge. This first course of the three-course series (the subsequent courses in the series are Introduction to Electromagnetism and Introduction to Modern Physics) will cover the area of physics known as classical mechanics. Classical mechanics is the study of motion based on the physics of Galileo Galilei and Isaac Newton.While mathematics is the language of physics, you will only need to be familiar with high school level algebra, geometry, and trigonometry. The small amount of additional math and calculus that we need will be developed during the course.

Details

  • Days of the Week: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday
  • Level of Difficulty: All Levels
  • Size: One-on-One
  • Cost: Free
  • Institution: Saylor
  • Topics: General Engineering, Algebra, Calculus, General Mathematics, Geometry, Trigonometry, Biology, Chemistry, Physics

Provider Overview

About Saylor: The mission of the Saylor Foundation is to make education freely available to all. Guided by the belief that technology has the potential to circumvent barriers that prevent many individuals from participating in traditional schooling models, the Foundation is committed to developing and advancing inventive and effective ways of harnessing technology in order to drive the cost of education down to zero

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