Main Profile

At A Glance

Human Physiology

Human physiology is the study of the body’s processes, also known as functions. You already have experience with this subject, because you are a human and perform numerous functions each day to maintain your body’s balance or homeostasis. For example, gas exchange in your lungs provides the body’s cells with adequate oxygen supply needed to survive and carry out metabolic processes. Digestion of food components in your mouth, stomach, and small intestines breaks larger substances into molecul...

Topics: Chemistry
Cost: Free

Contact

Human Physiology's Full Profile

Overview

Description

Human physiology is the study of the body’s processes, also known as functions. You already have experience with this subject, because you are a human and perform numerous functions each day to maintain your body’s balance or homeostasis. For example, gas exchange in your lungs provides the body’s cells with adequate oxygen supply needed to survive and carry out metabolic processes. Digestion of food components in your mouth, stomach, and small intestines breaks larger substances into molecules that can be absorbed in the small intestines and used for energy. White blood cells attack foreign bodies, such as bacteria and cells containing viruses to keep you free from infection.As you might expect, an understanding of physiology is paramount if you wish to pursue studies in health care, development, or even behavior. A doctor needs to understand how to relate a urine sample to kidney function. A nurse needs to know the importance of electrocardiogram results and heart activity. A medical laboratory scientist needs to relate blood enzymes to disease states, such as anemia or diabetes mellitus. No matter what your role is in medicine, you must know how the body works and what happens when it does not function appropriately.In this course, we will look at each organ system in detail and then discuss the ways in which these systems interact in order to maintain overall body functioning. Metabolism and homeostasis – or the maintenance of the body at a set, optimal level – will be important themes found throughout the units. We will accordingly discuss metabolic processes at length from the cellular to the organismal level. Although this course will focus on the function (physiology) of the human body, it is necessary to have a good grasp of anatomy in order to fully understand function. We will briefly review the anatomy of each organ system before studying the systems themselves. If you would like to get more information or review the anatomy of each system, please refer toBIO302: Human Anatomy.As we work through this course, the importance of the structure-function relationship between anatomy and physiology will become apparent. Keep thinking about how anatomy (structure) is important to physiology (function). Why are the valves of the heart only one way? Why are muscle cells long rather than round? These kinds of questions should be asked and answered as you move through this course.This is an advanced course and therefore mastery of lower level pre-requisites is imperative. You should have a good understanding of material covered inBIO101A: Introduction to Cellular and Molecular BiologyorBIO101B: Introduction to Cellular and Molecular BiologyandBIO302: Human Anatomyas this course builds on what you have already learned in those courses. It is also recommended thatCHEM101: General Chemistry Iis taken prior to this course as an understanding of molecules is important in physiology. Finally, in order to practice what you learn in this course in a more hands on manner, theBIO304L: Human Physiology Labis a co-requisite and must be taken at the same time as this course.

Details

  • Days of the Week: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday
  • Level of Difficulty: All Levels
  • Size: One-on-One
  • Cost: Free
  • Institution: Saylor
  • Topics: Chemistry

Provider Overview

About Saylor: The mission of the Saylor Foundation is to make education freely available to all. Guided by the belief that technology has the potential to circumvent barriers that prevent many individuals from participating in traditional schooling models, the Foundation is committed to developing and advancing inventive and effective ways of harnessing technology in order to drive the cost of education down to zero

Latest Tweet

Saylor Offers Courses In: Science

Questions about Human Physiology

Want more info about Human Physiology? Get free advice from education experts and Noodle community members.

  • Answer